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FighterInSnatch
11-16-2005, 05:29 AM
I thought it would be a great idea for an official thread for YOUR top 5 essentials to cutting fat. I think this could narrow it down to the 5 most important. Thanx everyone.


Ryan aka Fighter In Snatch

1. Exercise.
2. No Processed Foods.
3. EFA's.
4. No refined carbs. Complex carbs only.
5. Burning more calories then taking in.

HILL
11-16-2005, 05:49 AM
1. calorie deficit
2. heavy weight training
3. high protein
4. correct amount of healthy fats(0.5g/lbm)
5. dedication

g00dnick
11-16-2005, 09:32 AM
damn...summed it up perfectly :withstupi

squat it all!
11-16-2005, 09:34 AM
these are all good. if i would add one more, it would be to drink lots of water.

bigsethmeister
11-16-2005, 09:41 AM
1. calorie deficit (duh)
2. heavy lifting
3. at least 6 meals per day (eat every 2.5 hours)
4. fewer carbs
5. higher fat intake

ShockBoxer
11-17-2005, 07:32 AM
Hm. I don't know about the whole carb thing.

I've lost 17 lbs over 17 weeks and pound back a lot of fast food or restaurant chow over the run of a typical week. A lot.

My personal 5 look like Hill's.

galileo
11-17-2005, 08:59 AM
Hill's is the best so far.


I'll go ahead and say :

1. Caloric Deficit
2. Weight Training
3. EFAs
4. Sleep
5. Consistency

getfit
11-17-2005, 09:05 AM
yep, with hill's post

i'm not one to diet, but so far so good :D

Y0yo
11-17-2005, 10:01 AM
Lift heavy
Eat properly
Sleep enough
Monitor all of the above to make the right adjustments when needed
Keep at it

Shao-LiN
11-17-2005, 06:08 PM
I thought it would be a great idea for an official thread for YOUR top 5 essentials to cutting fat. I think this could narrow it down to the 5 most important. Thanx everyone.


Ryan aka Fighter In Snatch

1. Exercise.
2. No Processed Foods.
3. EFA's.
4. No refined carbs. Complex carbs only.
5. Burning more calories then taking in.

Can shed fat on processed foods and refined carbs...it isn't the healthiest thing in the world, but those aren't "essentials".

Built
11-17-2005, 06:11 PM
1. Sufficient (but not excessive) caloric deficit
2. Heavy lifting to protect LBM
3. Sufficient protein
4. Sufficient fat/EFAs
5. Planning/control of appetite

accuFLEX
11-17-2005, 06:37 PM
how to do it if your a student
1.workout
2.get laid
3.eat
4.sleep
5.study

shootermcgavin7
11-18-2005, 10:39 PM
I'd like to point out that the 5 keys might vary based on experience level. I pissed away my first couple of years trying to "cut" when I didn't have the muscle mass to really support it. As a result, I had to cut calories too much to lose weight, and basically ended up where I started.

I know a lot of people worry about "putting on fat" during a bulk, especially when they are new.....but if you are skinny already, cutting isn't going to make you look ripped.

Anyway, I only have one true 'essential', and that is to make sure you've had a good bulk before you shoot for one.

It's a lot easier to get to 8% bf when you're 225 lb with 3-4 years of lifting than 155 lb starting from scratch.


I realize my post is probably a little bit off topic, but I've noticed that a lot of people newer are falling into the same trap that I did when I started lifting; wanting to cut and cut, afraid of bulking.

Pup
11-20-2005, 08:39 AM
Not getting ridiculous on refeeds/cheats. Very few are gifted enough genetically that they can eat 6k+ worth of junk once a week and have no ill effects to their diet.

Balance is the other key...if you train hard and eat clean and VARIED diet (people that eat brown rice and plain chicken for 12 weeks at a time will fall off the wagon hard) many of the body composition issues will take care of themselves, there is always time to implement little tricks (fat loading, short-term fasting, etc.) but to maintain a healthy body over the long haul it's about balance.

shootermcgavin7
11-20-2005, 07:19 PM
Very few are gifted enough genetically that they can eat 6k+ worth of junk once a week and have no ill effects to their diet.
If "sanity" is important to a diet over a long run, I will have to respectfully disagree with you, even as some one would be lucky to be considered as "gentically average" physically.

the doc
11-21-2005, 04:52 AM
1. Sufficient (but not excessive) caloric deficit
2. Heavy lifting to protect LBM
3. Sufficient protein
4. Sufficient fat/EFAs
5. Planning/control of appetite
i like this list but i would mention that 4 & 5 are intimately related. Increasing the proportion of fat in my meals relates directly to the satiety of that meal and decreases my appetite.

Pup
11-21-2005, 05:11 AM
If "sanity" is important to a diet over a long run, I will have to respectfully disagree with you, even as some one would be lucky to be considered as "gentically average" physically.

We always seem to have respectful disagreements on something...I'm glad this time it doesn't involve politics...*watches worm on hook...bites*

Ok...you've given me the opportunity to discuss one of my favorite topics...refeeds...and their subsequent essentialness to a diet. My training partner in fact would put refeeds (his version is ice cream, pizza, mcdonald's and beer) in his top 5 of diet essentials. His success is impressive as well, he cheats once a week all the way up to a bodybuilding contest.

The reason i think that the issue of sanity comes up is because of the nature of most people's diet. When you say diet to most bodybuilder's or fitness enthusiasts, they envision weeks of plain chicken, tuna, brown rice and water at like 70% of their maintenance calories (no one seems to start a diet a little below maintenance)...if you ate that boring for 6 days in a row, then i agree that you would be on the verge of a psychotic episode and require a day of caloric therapy. My point is that for those who use a more moderate approach to dieting (say 500kcal deficit per day, with minimal deficit added from cardio) then the need physiologically or psychologically for an all out cheat is lessened significantly. It's one thing to have a planned cheat meal for a social gathering, beer and pizza with the guys or a nice dinner with the significant other once a week...but a whole day? I'd have to disagree that a day of eating complete crap is required to keep anyone from going mental (unless they are using some type of cyclical diet like UD2). The other reason reason, aside from calorie intake, that people claim to need a massive cheat-fest is the blandness of food...learn how to freaking cook people...anyone that's made one of Berardi's cheesecakes can tell you that you don't have to have a day of garbage eating to eat something that is both nutritious and still satifsfying to the palate.

To end my long winded diatribe...there are many who can use the cheat day concept with very good results, but more often than not those people are not endomorphs (the ones who generally have the most trouble losing fat and the worst "off-season" eating habits). The average person starting threads on boards like this who wants to get some help with his diet is an endomorph (I don't recall seeing many ectos wanting help on losing weight or bodyfat), with that being said, I think for those types of people working on a diet with more balance and less intense cheating would be more essential to dieting success.

Pup
11-21-2005, 05:16 AM
i like this list but i would mention that 4 & 5 are intimately related. Increasing the proportion of fat in my meals relates directly to the satiety of that meal and decreases my appetite.

I hear this preached constantly...and for me it flat out freaking doesn't work...dammit! If i could quantify on a scale of 1-10 how hungry i was after a protein/fat, protein/high gi, and protein/low gi carb meal...it'd be like 7, 9, and 5 respectively (i'm never not hungry, just varying amounts of less hungry). How the hell is that possible!

bigsethmeister
11-21-2005, 11:54 AM
weeks of plain chicken, tuna, brown rice and water ...learn how to freaking cook people...

Notwithstanding your lack of a comma, which had me momentarily considering cannibalism, I wholeheartedly agree. A lot can be done with spices and flavorings and there is no need to eat plain chicken and tuna out of the can.

I also agree with the "cheat meal" principle.

Since my body always grabs on and holds tight to fat and never misses a chance to gain it I find I can't do the "cheat day" stuff some of you guys do. It just sets me back way to farn and my cutting diet takes forever. An occasional "cheat meal" is an acceptable alternative for me.

shootermcgavin7
11-21-2005, 01:19 PM
To end my long winded diatribe...there are many who can use the cheat day concept with very good results, but more often than not those people are not endomorphs (the ones who generally have the most trouble losing fat and the worst "off-season" eating habits).

I had never thought about it in terms of bodytype before- I have very good success with a cheat day when cutting; but when I started lifting years ago I was 6'2", ~150 lbs; I don't fit the body type you're trying to structure your reply to.

the doc
11-21-2005, 01:19 PM
I hear this preached constantly...and for me it flat out freaking doesn't work...dammit! If i could quantify on a scale of 1-10 how hungry i was after a protein/fat, protein/high gi, and protein/low gi carb meal...it'd be like 7, 9, and 5 respectively (i'm never not hungry, just varying amounts of less hungry). How the hell is that possible!
you are a strange one eh? lol!

seriously though i am similar in that i am always hungry, but the thought of eating more tuna and peanut butter is just not the most appealing idea.

Built
11-21-2005, 01:22 PM
I just spread peanut butter on poached chicken breast, and it was awesome.

<= sad, I know.

I'm always game for more food. It's like I don't have an "off" switch.

Built
11-21-2005, 01:23 PM
i like this list but i would mention that 4 & 5 are intimately related. Increasing the proportion of fat in my meals relates directly to the satiety of that meal and decreases my appetite.

Absolutely. But the other thing is figuring out WHEN you're hungry - for me, it's at night. So I save extra calories for the evening by undereating slightly during the daytime.

I like to go to sleep feeling FED.

muscleup
11-21-2005, 01:57 PM
I just spread peanut butter on poached chicken breast, and it was awesome.

This made me throw up in my mouth a little.

It's one thing to choke down chicken breast after chicken breast and eat spoons of PB...but putting them together is going too far...

getfit
11-21-2005, 02:00 PM
^ i think it sounds pretty yummy, besides i don't eat chicken, it reminds me of some thai dish :D

ClubberLang
11-21-2005, 02:05 PM
sorry for what is perhaps a newb question.. but including/increasing healthy fat intake is important in order to help you feel full? it kinda goes against conventional wisdom. anyone care to explain more?

galileo
11-21-2005, 02:42 PM
Conventional wisdom is a cute way of saying propagated myths.

Fat doesn't make you fat, excess calories make you fat. Lowering fat is one trick to lowering total calories, which is where the idea of low-fat diets came into play. People just assume that eating fat means the fat will be stored, but it is a bit more complicated than this. If your body has excess calories, it will figure out how to store them. If it has a deficit, it will figure out how to use stored energy to make up the difference.

Maki Riddington
11-21-2005, 05:09 PM
The top 5 are dependant on the individual. It varies.

I touched on this in my first newsletter.

http://www.ptsuccesscoach.com/clients/maki/mrtrainingwebsite/september05newsletter.html

ClubberLang
11-25-2005, 04:06 AM
Conventional wisdom is a cute way of saying propagated myths.

Fat doesn't make you fat, excess calories make you fat. Lowering fat is one trick to lowering total calories, which is where the idea of low-fat diets came into play. People just assume that eating fat means the fat will be stored, but it is a bit more complicated than this. If your body has excess calories, it will figure out how to store them. If it has a deficit, it will figure out how to use stored energy to make up the difference.


I understand all of this. But what I want to know is why use part of your "caloric budget" for Fats? They are dense in calories.. so why not reduce fats in your diet... allowing you to eat in greater quantities while still staying at a deficit?

Anthony
11-25-2005, 05:12 AM
I understand all of this. But what I want to know is why use part of your "caloric budget" for Fats? They are dense in calories.. so why not reduce fats in your diet... allowing you to eat in greater quantities while still staying at a deficit?

There are certain fats (essential fatty acids or EFAs) that our body needs for optimal health that we cannot produce. This means we need to obtain them from an external source - food.

Why do we need them? Proper development and use of the brain/nervous system, lower LDL, raise HDL, regulate blood pressure, help immune functions, hormone production, etc, etc.

Not to mention that fat is more satiating than carbs or protein. So if you're in a deficit you will be less likely to get hungry/cravings if your diet has a good amount of healthy fats.