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KungPow
03-08-2006, 01:13 PM
I have been Squating under resonably heavy weights for some time now (>100 kg), but its only recently that i have been experiencing slight joint pain in my knee and hip when executing this excercise. I was just wondering if any experienced lifters could tell me if this is normal, or should i take a brief rest from squates??

jkirkpatrick
03-08-2006, 02:04 PM
Are you fully warmed up before you hit your working sets. I need to do three sets of 20 reps at 135lbs to loosen up sufficiently. This is excessive for most, but my pre-existing condition forces me to go this route.

The consequence is that I might not be as strong as I would be otherwise, but I am FULLY warmed up and loose.

How much do you stretch? How deep are you going? The deeper you go, the less stress on your knees. Stretch lots.

This is what works for me.

Hazerboy
03-08-2006, 08:25 PM
Really? Going deeper is actually better for your knees? Wow, I've never actually heard that. I would assume the excact opposite; is this your opinion or is it something thats pretty well excepted in the powerlifting community? I always thought that Oly lifters had pretty bad knee problems because then would go so low on squats. Whats the scientific reason behind this? I'm not trying to be jerk, just eager to learn. :)

Optimum08
03-08-2006, 09:19 PM
The deeper you go, the less stress on your knees.

evidence?

Optimum08
03-08-2006, 09:20 PM
but you do need to make sure your sufficiently warmed up, and by warmed up i don't mean a couple reps with the bar, i mean getting a good sweat going either on a bike or jump rope or something to raise the heartrate. And also you might try wearing a pair of sweats when lifting legs/squatting, keeps them nice and warm during your sets.

jkirkpatrick
03-08-2006, 09:21 PM
Not specifically related to powerlifters - related to all lifters of any sort.

It's not an opinion. I don't remember where to point you but try this:

Squat down (no weights). Now squat down as low as you have been going. You will feel it more in your knees doing it your way than going as low as you can. Sheering forces on the knee are reduced once you get down real low and your hamstrings, groin, and other muscle groups get involved.

Hopefully somebody else who knows where the information is will post. But it's true.

BigRic
03-08-2006, 11:26 PM
I think I've also seen studies where this is shown. I'll try searching.

BigRic
03-08-2006, 11:26 PM
Edit: Double Post.

DeusFacticius
03-15-2006, 08:10 PM
i've gotten tendonitis in my knees from squating, very possible its what you've gotten.

instead of stop squating all together, do box squats instead.

drew
03-16-2006, 07:07 AM
Box squats. And start using briefs or a suit when you squat.

Sensei
03-17-2006, 08:34 AM
Mel Siff compilation
http://staff.washington.edu/griffin/squat_research.txt

Probably a search of the Supertraining listserve archives would probably trn up some stuff, but I don't have time right now.

MixmasterNash
03-17-2006, 09:38 AM
evidence?

Torque is maximized at the knees if you only go to parallel. Going below parallel will shift the torque to the hips.

This is why you never, ever want to catch any olympic lift and stay at parallel; you only want to catch in a squat (regular clean or snatch) or well above parallel (power clean...).

ElPietro
03-17-2006, 10:11 AM
Find a local powerlifting club and contact a powerlifter. Find out where they train and almost any powerlifter will not have a problem checking your form and giving tips.

99% of trainees do not squat properly, and it can literally take months to perfect proper squat form.

Most people squat downward first, instead of back and down, this places the load forward which can put more strain on parts of the body that shouldn't be getting that strain.

drew
03-17-2006, 10:38 AM
99% of trainees do not squat properly, and it can literally take months to perfect proper squat form.
Not months, years. Many years.

Chris Rodgers
03-17-2006, 08:55 PM
Find a local powerlifting club and contact a powerlifter. Find out where they train and almost any powerlifter will not have a problem checking your form and giving tips.

99% of trainees do not squat properly, and it can literally take months to perfect proper squat form.

Most people squat downward first, instead of back and down, this places the load forward which can put more strain on parts of the body that shouldn't be getting that strain.


:study:

I like this answer. Since I started training in a commercial gym recently for my raw work, I have seen some very interesting "squat" form. I cringe at the site of most of it, but so far I have bit my tongue. Soon I might have to step in. :)