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ClubberLang
03-13-2006, 06:00 PM
Is the carb content of 2% milk to high to make it a staple of my keto diet?

brickt.
03-13-2006, 06:28 PM
I'd say yes, as those 8carbs or so would be MUCH MUCH better off going towards vegies.

lifter4life
03-13-2006, 06:57 PM
drink soymilk and also vegetables and fruits contain lots of fiber so you could actually subtract the fiber from the carbohydrates to get the true amount of caloric carbs so you can eat more :).

ddegroff
03-13-2006, 08:35 PM
last time i checked 1g CHO = 4kcal. Eating fiber doesn't subtract out the calories that you've eatin. Thats sounds like some kind of Atkins theory.

Built
03-13-2006, 08:38 PM
fiber is a carb, but doesn't quite work out to 4 cals per gram, though.

Isn't soymilk full of carbs?

Bohizzle
03-13-2006, 08:43 PM
from my understanding, the carbs that come from fibres don't in caloric terms because the fiber isn't digested and just passes through and thus no calories are absorbed. can someone with better understanding of this clarify it for me?

Andrew

ClubberLang
03-13-2006, 10:04 PM
i'm not liking this this nutritional profile in soy milk in contrast to 2%..

http://www.calorie-count.com/calories/item/16120.html

brickt.
03-13-2006, 10:39 PM
Fibre contains 1.5-2 cals per gram.

ddegroff
03-13-2006, 11:25 PM
^^^is that insoluble or soluble or both? because if the body doesn't break down insoluble it still needs the energy to move it through the body, right?

brickt.
03-13-2006, 11:54 PM
Dunno, man. I just ripped it from one of lyle's books.

baja_stx
03-14-2006, 06:30 AM
I don't know how true it is, but I also remember reading that you subtract the amount of fibre from the amount of total carbs to get "net carbs".

I have some whole wheat pita wraps in my frig right now that say it on the package. Also, the Weight Watchers diet follows this rule, they fit it into their points system, but you can only subtract upto 4g of fibre per food.
(I'm not stating that those are reliable sources, but there may be some truth to this.)

TheGimp
03-14-2006, 06:47 AM
Isn't soymilk full of carbs?

Unsweetened soy milk contains virtually no carbs making it ideal for low carb diets.

TheGimp
03-14-2006, 06:52 AM
i'm not liking this this nutritional profile in soy milk in contrast to 2%..

http://www.calorie-count.com/calories/item/16120.html

Try a unsweetened variety:

http://www.westsoy.biz/products/product/1118.php

TheGimp
03-14-2006, 06:56 AM
from my understanding, the carbs that come from fibres don't in caloric terms because the fiber isn't digested and just passes through and thus no calories are absorbed. can someone with better understanding of this clarify it for me?

Andrew

There are quite a few types of fiber. The insoluble varities are largely indigestible. The soluble ones can be broken down into short chain fatty acids by the bacteria in your gut thus making a small calorie contribution (as stated ~2 cals per gram)

baja_stx
03-14-2006, 06:58 AM
i'm not liking this this nutritional profile in soy milk in contrast to 2%..

http://www.calorie-count.com/calories/item/16120.html

I don't know what kind of Soy milk that is, but I drink Silk brand and it doesn't match that label. Here's a comparison.

Light Silk
Total Fat - 2g
Sat - 0g
Poly - 1g
Mono - .5g
Cholesterol - 0g
Sodium - 95g
Potassium - 300mg
Total Carbs - 10g
Fiber - 1g
Sugar - 7g
Protein - 6g

Regular 2% Milk
Total Fat - 5g
Sat - 3.5g
Poly - ?
Mono - ?
Cholesterol - 20mg
Sodium - 110g
Total Carbs - 11g
Fiber - 0g
Sugar - 11g
Protein - 8g

So the Silk has less total fat, no saturated fat, no cholesterol, slightly less sodium, less sugar, and more fibre. The only place I see it loose is in the protein category w/ 2g less, but that's fine by me because I only use it to mix my protein shakes so there's plenty of protein there.

TheGimp
03-14-2006, 07:02 AM
Drinking reduced fat soy milk seems a little crazy to me. One of soy milk's advantages, in particular in comparison with cow juice, is its excellent lipid profile.

baja_stx
03-14-2006, 07:15 AM
Drinking reduced fat soy milk seems a little crazy to me. One of soy milk's advantages, in particular in comparison with cow juice, is its excellent lipid profile.

You are right about that. I did actually switch to regular Soy, but I don't have it entered into FitDay yet so I don't know for sure what the nutritional infomation is. I do know that all the ingredients are the same except the regular has more poly and mono unsaturated fats than light.

Good call!