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jarrett1
03-16-2006, 05:25 PM
how much water should i drink if im going to be lifting tommorw.. im 189 lbs :bash:

getfit
03-16-2006, 05:55 PM
don't you drink water even when you're not lifting?

jarrett1
03-16-2006, 06:36 PM
don't you drink water even when you're not lifting?
yea but i herd u should drink like 3 bottle before lifting

ShadyRensch
03-16-2006, 07:58 PM
1-2 gallons per day

ArchAngel777
03-16-2006, 07:59 PM
1-2 gallons per day

Wow, I never drink more than a gallon!!! Kudos for getting up to two... Gosh, I'd be bloated as heck.

drew
03-16-2006, 08:13 PM
Yeah, I try to aim for 1.5 gals a day. If I get 2, good for me.

Sidior
03-16-2006, 08:26 PM
till your piss is clear

Roddy
03-16-2006, 10:23 PM
3 bottles before lifting? WTF. who told you that? just consume water consistantly throughout the day. every hour or more that your awake. 64oz is decent.

dont drink like 6 gallons tho on the other hand, or you might knock your electrolyte balance off.

Kiaran
03-16-2006, 10:45 PM
I'll pull in between 80-128oz of clean clear water everyday. I don't count anything that is not plain water.

Joe Black
03-16-2006, 10:50 PM
Don't sweat it too much... Theres not a amount for your weight or because its a training day thats going to make a huge amount of difference.

What will make a difference is if you don't consume very much, period.

Typically I tend to consume about 4-5 litres.

I drink a litre in the morning, a litre in the afternoon, a couple of litres during training and probably one in the evening.

ddegroff
03-16-2006, 10:59 PM
all i drink is water... I get about 100ozs a day about, its personal, whatever you can get down.

Clifford Gillmore
03-16-2006, 11:14 PM
I'll get in 4-5 litres a day if I'm at work, off work its alot harder to carry a gallon container around.

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-17-2006, 01:29 AM
The minimum requirement for the average joe is 13 cups (104 ounces) of water. Weightlifters require even more than this. You should probably shoot for a gallon or more (a gallon is 128 ounces).

Jordanbcool
03-17-2006, 09:02 AM
I didnt even read the other posts but heres how much water you should drink.

AS MUCH AS YOU WANT.

Water is water is water. It doesent have carbs, fat, or protein in it. Hence is has no calories. This stuff can only help you.

Drink up my friend.

-jordan

ShadyRensch
03-17-2006, 09:10 AM
Yea I guess the 1-2 gallons isn't for everybody, but like the person above said, just keep drinking it until your pee is clear, then just drink whatever u want after that.

ArchAngel777
03-17-2006, 09:26 AM
The minimum requirement for the average joe is 13 cups (104 ounces) of water. Weightlifters require even more than this. You should probably shoot for a gallon or more (a gallon is 128 ounces).

I don't agree with this. Water consumption, while healthy, has been blown way out of proportion.

If 13 cups of liquid was minimum, i'd be dead and that is a fact. Some people quote 64 ounces, some say 128 ounces, some say that is far to much. Whatever the case, people can and will survive and entire life time on less than 48 ounces of liquid per day. I know for 6 years I didn't drink any water and the most liquids I had were a few cans of soda each day. So, 12 X 3 = 36 ounces and then a small amount of liquid from foods. Yet, i am still alive.

That doesn't mean I think people should walk around with low water intakes though. The best advice I have ever read on the issue is drink enough water for two clear, or near clear urinations a day. After that, drink as little or much as you want. You will stay healthy if you follow that advice.

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-17-2006, 12:39 PM
don't agree with this. Water consumption, while healthy, has been blown way out of proportion.I don't care what you agree with, that's the minimum. I didn't say that's the minimum you need to survive. But the body rids itself of a LOT of H20 throughout the day and that needs to be replenished. Most people I know don't consume that much water.



If 13 cups of liquid was minimum, i'd be dead and that is a fact. Some people quote 64 ounces, some say 128 ounces, some say that is far to much13 cups for males and around 9 cups for females. Yes, there is water from food, juice, etc...so it's hard to actually know just exactly how much water you're getting.

If you're an active weighlifter you are expending more than the average sedentary person.

ArchAngel777
03-17-2006, 12:51 PM
I don't care what you agree with, that's the minimum. I didn't say that's the minimum you need to survive. But the body rids itself of a LOT of H20 throughout the day and that needs to be replenished. Most people I know don't consume that much water.


13 cups for males and around 9 cups for females. Yes, there is water from food, juice, etc...so it's hard to actually know just exactly how much water you're getting.

If you're an active weighlifter you are expending more than the average sedentary person.

Do a search on google, you will find hundreds of articles on water intake. Half of them spewing out the 8 - 8oz glass a day theory with the other half saying, that is ridiculous and isn't that cut and dry.

Instead of caring whether or not I argee with it, maybe I should state that several articles don't agree with your assessment.

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-17-2006, 12:59 PM
Google is full of BS. This is what I've learned from my Nutrition class (our book is from 2006). This is from the latest scientific research. We've even talked about bodybuilders and their need for a higher water intake. Every single cell in your entire body needs water to function. Your muscles will benefit from and increased water intake because they composed of mostly water.



Instead of caring whether or not I argee with it, maybe I should state that several articles don't agree with your assessment.This is not my assessment, this is the latest scientific data. Your water intake differs depending on your activity level. 64 ounces would probably suffice if you're inactive. That's only like 3 bottles of water. Increased water intake can also help to burn fat.

ArchAngel777
03-17-2006, 01:03 PM
Take from here (http://www.scienceagogo.com/news/20020711213420data_trunc_sys.shtml)



Recommended Water Intake A Myth

It has become accepted wisdom: "Drink at least eight glasses of water a day!" Not necessarily, says a DMS physician Heinz Valtin, MD. The universal advice that has made guzzling water a national pastime is more urban myth than medical dogma and appears to lack scientific proof, he found. In an invited review published online by the American Journal of Physiology August 8, Valtin, professor emeritus of physiology at Dartmouth Medical School, reports no supporting evidence to back this popular counsel, commonly known as "8 x 8" (for eight, eight-ounce glasses). The review will also appear in a later issue of the journal.

Valtin, a kidney specialist and author of two widely used textbooks on the kidney and water balance, sought to find the origin of this dictum and to examine the scientific evidence, if any, that might support it. He observes that we see the exhortation everywhere: from health writers, nutritionists, even physicians. Valtin doubts its validity. Indeed, he finds it, "difficult to believe that evolution left us with a chronic water deficit that needs to be compensated by forcing a high fluid intake."

The 8 x 8 rule is slavishly followed. Everywhere, people carry bottles of water, constantly sipping from them; it is acceptable to drink water anywhere, anytime. A pamphlet distributed at one southern California university even counsels its students to "carry a water bottle with you. Drink often while sitting in class..."

How did the obsession start? Is there any scientific evidence that supports the recommendation? Does the habit promote good health? Might it be harmful?

Valtin thinks the notion may have started when the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Research Council recommended approximately "1 milliliter of water for each calorie of food," which would amount to roughly two to two-and-a-half quarts per day (64 to 80 ounces). Although in its next sentence, the Board stated "most of this quantity is contained in prepared foods," that last sentence may have been missed, so that the recommendation was erroneously interpreted as how much water one should drink each day.

He found no scientific studies in support of 8 x 8. Rather, surveys of fluid intake on healthy adults of both genders, published as peer-reviewed documents, strongly suggest that such large amounts are not needed. His conclusion is supported by published studies showing that caffeinated drinks, such as most coffee, tea and soft drinks, may indeed be counted toward the daily total. He also points to the quantity of published experiments that attest to the capability of the human body for maintaining proper water balance.

Valtin emphasizes that his conclusion is limited to healthy adults in a temperate climate leading a largely sedentary existence -- precisely, he points out, the population and conditions that the "at least" in 8 x 8 refers to. At the same time, he stresses that large intakes of fluid, equal to and greater than 8 x 8, are advisable for the treatment or prevention of some diseases, such as kidney stones, as well as under special circumstances, such as strenuous physical activity, long airplane flights or hot weather. But barring those exceptions, he concludes that we are currently drinking enough and possibly even more than enough.

Despite the dearth of compelling evidence, then, What's the harm? "The fact is that, potentially, there is harm even in water," explains Valtin. Even modest increases in fluid intake can result in "water intoxication" if one's kidneys are unable to excrete enough water (urine). Such instances are not unheard of, and they have led to mental confusion and even death in athletes, in teenagers after ingesting the recreational drug Ecstasy, and in ordinary patients.

And he lists other disadvantages of a high water intake: (a) possible exposure to pollutants, especially if sustained over many years; (b) frequent urination, which can be both inconvenient and embarrassing; (c) expense, for those who satisfy the 8 x 8 requirements with bottled water; and (d) feelings of guilt for not achieving 8 x 8.

Other claims discredited by scientific evidence that Valtin discusses include:


Thirst Is Too Late. It is often stated that by the time people are thirsty, they are already dehydrated. On the contrary, thirst begins when the concentration of blood (an accurate indicator of our state of hydration) has risen by less than two percent, whereas most experts would define dehydration as beginning when that concentration has risen by at least five percent.

Dark Urine Means Dehydration. At normal urinary volume and color, the concentration of the blood is within the normal range and nowhere near the values that are seen in meaningful dehydration. Therefore, the warning that dark urine reflects dehydration is alarmist and false in most instances.
Is there scientific documentation that we do not need to drink "8 x 8"? There is highly suggestive evidence, says Valtin. First is the voluminous scientific literature on the efficacy of the osmoregulatory system that maintains water balance through the antidiuretic hormone and thirst. Second, published surveys document that the mean daily fluid intake of thousands of presumably healthy humans is less than the roughly two quarts prescribed by 8 x 8. Valtin argues that, in view of this evidence, the burden of proof that everyone needs 8 x 8 should fall on those who persist in advocating the high fluid intake without, apparently, citing any scientific support.

Finally, strong evidence now indicates that not all of the prescribed fluid need be in the form of water. Careful peer-reviewed experiments have shown that caffeinated drinks should indeed count toward the daily fluid intake in the vast majority of persons. To a lesser extent, the same probably can be said for dilute alcoholic beverages, such as beer, if taken in moderation.

"Thus, I have found no scientific proof that absolutely every person must 'drink at least eight glasses of water a day'," says Valtin. While there is some evidence that the risk of certain diseases can be lowered by high water intake, the quantities needed for this beneficial effect may be less than 8 x 8, and the recommendation can be limited to those particularly susceptible to the diseases in question.

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-17-2006, 01:08 PM
You need to replace whatever water you lose during the day. That varies from person to person depending on just the individual or their level of activity. It's really not that complicated. Don't hurt yourself.

I will, however, agree with your clear urination test. That is a fairly good thing to go by.

ArchAngel777
03-17-2006, 01:09 PM
You need to replace whatever water you lose during the day. That varies from person to person depending on just the individual or their level of activity. It's really not that complicated. Don't hurt yourself.

LOL, sounds like you are taking this pretty personally. You shouldn't as this is a discussion.

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-17-2006, 01:10 PM
I'm not taking anything personally. It's a basic concept.

ArchAngel777
03-17-2006, 01:11 PM
Here is another, from another source.

http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/womenshealth/features/watermyth.htm

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-17-2006, 01:20 PM
According to Dr Barnard, the body's daily water loss, on average, amounts to 1-1.5 litres. If someone is undertaking a lot of activity, and therefore breathing and sweating more, then the individual would lose moreThat is pretty much what I already said. Your body needs whatever it expends. You don't need a million articles to grasp that concept.

ArchAngel777
03-17-2006, 01:24 PM
That is pretty much what I already said. Your body needs whatever it expends. You don't need a million articles to grasp that concept.

Actually, no... You said the following


The minimum requirement for the average joe is 13 cups (104 ounces) of water. Weightlifters require even more than this. You should probably shoot for a gallon or more (a gallon is 128 ounces).

104 ounces is quite a bit more than 1 - 1.5 litres.

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-17-2006, 01:36 PM
That 1-1.5 liters is actually quite wrong and I don't know where that number came from.



Water needs vary greatly depending on the foods a person eats, the environmental temperature and humidity, the altitude, the person's activity level, and other factors. Because individual needs vary, adequate hydration can be maintained over a wide range of fluid intakes. As a general guideline, the DRI committee recommends that, given a normal diet and moderate environmental conditions, men need about 13 cups of fluid from beverages and drinking water, and women need about 9 cups. This amount of fluid provides 80 percent of the day's need for water. Most of the rest is provided by the water consumed in foods. Nearly all foods contain some water: water constitutes up to 95 percent of the volume of most fruits and vegetables, and at least 50 percent of many meats and cheeses. A small percentage of the day's fluid is generated in the tissues as energy-yielding nutrients in foods release water as a product of chemical breakdown.

Sweating increases water needs. Especially when performing physical work outdoors in hot weather, people can lose two to four gallons of fluid in a day. An athlete training in the heat can sweat out more than half a gallon of fluid each hour. The importance of maintaining hydration for athletes exercising in the heat cannot be overemphasized.

ArchAngel777
03-17-2006, 01:46 PM
If you quote something, you need to give a source. Please post the source.

Quote from http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/womenshealth/features/watermyth.htm


So how much should you drink?

The minimum figures for the body's daily water loss are 500ml through urine and 700ml through breathing and sweating. Doctors advise that to be on the safe side we should drink at least 1.2 litres, which is 2.5 pints, of liquid. So, remember, although water is essential, you don't need to become obsessed about drinking eight glasses a day!

2.5 pints = 40 oz of liquid, not water even. So if you are eating jello, for instance two bowls of it will be enough for the day and you wouldn't even need to drink anything. Of course, presuming you didn't exercise or live in an ungodly hot climate.

The quote you have saying some people can loose 4 gallons of water? If I ever heard an exaggeration, that has to be it.

4 X 8.33 = 33.32 lbs... So, basically people would go from 200 lbs. to 166.6 lbs. in one day? That might be possible, but extremely unlikely.

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-17-2006, 01:51 PM
The source is the textbook I used in my Nutrition class in college for my major. This is derived from many different scientific studies. The book is from 2006. Your body uses considerably more than 1-1.5 liters. I've learned this from multiple biology classes as well. I think the myth here is the 1-1.5 liters that the body expends during the day.

ArchAngel777
03-17-2006, 01:54 PM
The source is the textbook I used in my Nutrition class in college for my major. This is derived from many different scientific studies. The book is from 2006. Your body uses considerably more than 1-1.5 liters. I've learned this from multiple biology classes as well. I think the myth here is the 1-1.5 liters that the body expends during the day.

What studies was it derived from? What is the name of the book?

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-17-2006, 01:58 PM
Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies

ArchAngel777
03-17-2006, 02:22 PM
So, let me get this straight. According to you, 104 ounces for average joe is correct because your science book which was revised in 2006 says so? But, you are discounting Dr. Valtin's claim that "No scientific evidence to support the 8 X 8oz glasses of water theory"?

At this point, I'd have to ask where the studies are in this book of yours and what references they cited. If they are giving a daily water intake, then they should have sound evidence for the recomendation. That would then put this issue to rest.

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-17-2006, 02:27 PM
His claims are wrong. And what I said wasn't the 8x8 theory.

And it's a scientific textbook. There's almost 200 references to this chapter on water intake alone. And most of them are from scientific journals.

ArchAngel777
03-17-2006, 02:32 PM
His claims are wrong. And what I said wasn't the 8x8 theory.

And it's a scientific textbook. There's almost 200 references to this chapter on water intake alone. And most of them are from scientific journals.

Have you checked out the references? When I get to the library or book store, I will check out those references. I want to see for myself on this issue. Since I have done a search on google and cannot FIND anything supporting water intake that large. Maybe I havn't searched hard enough... But if proper research has been done, then this issue would be all over the web as far as the "truth" is concerned.

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-17-2006, 02:36 PM
That's why the web isn't always the best source for information. There are so many references in the back of this book it makes my eyes bleed. I'll PM you with the references later when I have more time to look over them (I have to pull out ones specific to water intake). =)

ArchAngel777
03-17-2006, 02:39 PM
That would be awesome.

Thanks,

Gabriel

Jordanbcool
03-17-2006, 02:40 PM
What a huge waste of time.

DRINK AS MUCH WATER AS YOU WANT.

Christ, are the specifics that hard to come up with?

Next you guys will start arguing about how much oxygen we need to take in each day to live healthy lives.

It would be more helpful if everyone stopped trying to prove everyone else wrong.

-jordan

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-17-2006, 02:40 PM
Your post provided nothing constructive. Thanks. Try NOT tainting every thread you post in. We're having a discussion. You're just being bitter for no reason.

ArchAngel777
03-17-2006, 02:46 PM
What a huge waste of time.

DRINK AS MUCH WATER AS YOU WANT.

Christ, are the specifics that hard to come up with?

Next you guys will start arguing about how much oxygen we need to take in each day to live healthy lives.

It would be more helpful if everyone stopped trying to prove everyone else wrong.

-jordan

Jordan, actually, the reason I bring up things like this, or rather, debate them is because I typically learn many things and then can correct them. That way, for instance, once I am done researching this issue, whatever conclusion I come too, I can then update it in my personal advice category.

Basically, I think me and Scarz already agree on the practical application the issue. It is more into the details... As far as oxygen? Well, that is something that is determined by your brain stem. Thus, I don't see how the relates to voluntary water intake.

At first, I used to think Slim Shaede was a bit hard on you, but I may understand why now.

Jordanbcool
03-17-2006, 02:48 PM
Your post provided nothing constructive. Thanks. Try NOT tainting every thread you post in. We're having a discussion. You're just being bitter for no reason.

No need to be dramatic. Im just saying that you shouldnt worry about the specifics of water consumption. Its water.

Everyones made their point. Lets all just go relax somewhere and take a break from the comps.

-jordan

P.S. Im going to take a nice long shower :D

Jordanbcool
03-17-2006, 02:49 PM
Jordan, actually, the reason I bring up things like this, or rather, debate them is because I typically learn many things and then can correct them. That way, for instance, once I am done researching this issue, whatever conclusion I come too, I can then update it in my personal advice category.

Basically, I think me and Scarz already agree on the practical application the issue. It is more into the details... As far as oxygen? Well, that is something that is determined by your brain stem. Thus, I don't see how the relates to voluntary water intake.

At first, I used to think Slim Shaede was a bit hard on you, but I may understand why now.

Everyones always hard on me lol.

:cry:

Its fine though, most people have good intentions. Plus its hard to be pissed off at your monitor for very long, if you know what i mean.

-jordan

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-17-2006, 02:50 PM
No need to be dramatic.Your previous post was dramatic. Next time I'll just ignore random negative comments from you that don't add to the discussion.

ArchAngel777
03-17-2006, 02:51 PM
No need to be dramatic. Im just saying that you shouldnt worry about the specifics of water consumption. Its water.

Everyones made their point. Lets all just go relax somewhere and take a break from the comps.

-jordan

P.S. Im going to take a nice long shower :D

You are misssing the point (again). Debating isn't the same thing as argueing. A debate is a calm discussion and bringing view points to the table. Most people who will debate, rather than argue are typically open minded and can indeed be convinved. I guess that is what goes on here.

I personally do not have anything against you, not at all. But you do seem to, uhm... crap on threads quite a bit.

But, there is no need for anyone in this thread to cool down, because as far as I know, no one is pissed off over this besides you, possibly.

Jordanbcool
03-17-2006, 02:53 PM
Your previous post was dramatic. Next time I'll just ignore random negative comments from you that don't add to the discussion.

You do that.

-jordan

P.S. Like i said. Step away from the comp for an hour or so. It will do us all good.

Jorge Sanchez
03-17-2006, 02:55 PM
Again... I see a bit of a pattern emerging.

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-17-2006, 02:55 PM
Like i said. Step away from the comp for an hour or so. It will do us all good.I don't need to step away from the comp. I'm perfectly fine right now.

Moving on...

@ ArchAngel777: I'll get those references to you when I have time. I'll probably end up diving more deeply into this as well.

Jordanbcool
03-17-2006, 02:55 PM
You are misssing the point (again). Debating isn't the same thing as argueing. A debate is a calm discussion and bringing view points to the table. Most people who will debate, rather than argue are typically open minded and can indeed be convinved. I guess that is what goes on here.

I personally do not have anything against you, not at all. But you do seem to, uhm... crap on threads quite a bit.

But, there is no need for anyone in this thread to cool down, because as far as I know, no one is pissed off over this besides you, possibly.

Heck i didnt even look at the posts you guys made. I just assumed you were arguing. If you werent then its fine. Usually when people are rude to me is the only time im rude back. In this case it was a random outburst of anger. Sorry.

-jordan

Jordanbcool
03-17-2006, 02:57 PM
Again... I see a bit of a pattern emerging.

My buddy jorge. How have you been.

Long time eh?

Like two days lol.

-jordan

P.S. ok ok ok im done. Guys im just messing around with you. Im actually having a great day right now. I've set up a date with a cute girl next week on spring break :). Continue your discussion.

-jordan

ArchAngel777
03-17-2006, 02:58 PM
Heck i didnt even look at the posts you guys made. I just assumed you were arguing. If you werent then its fine. Usually when people are rude to me is the only time im rude back. In this case it was a random outburst of anger. Sorry.

-jordan

Dude.... Well, thanks for saying sorry. But seriously, look at what you wrote! The first sentance says it all to me.

Jordanbcool
03-17-2006, 03:01 PM
Dude.... Well, thanks for saying sorry. But seriously, look at what you wrote! The first sentance says it all to me.

I was just annoyed at how much time was spent being discussed on drinking water. Like i said it was random and i apoligize for it.

-jordan

ArchAngel777
03-17-2006, 03:05 PM
One thing I really like about you, your willingness to apologize. That actually does say a lot about a person. Most people (myself) included have a hard time fessing up when we have dome something wrong at times. Kudos for stepping up to the plate, I do respect that... Now, lets just work on your random thread crapping and we should get along pretty great, as well as other people in the forum as well.

Here is a present for you... Baking you some bread :fart:

Intensity&Focus
03-17-2006, 03:12 PM
What a huge waste of time.

DRINK AS MUCH WATER AS YOU WANT.

Christ, are the specifics that hard to come up with?

Next you guys will start arguing about how much oxygen we need to take in each day to live healthy lives.

It would be more helpful if everyone stopped trying to prove everyone else wrong.

-jordan


I also take a nutrition course and as far as drinking as much water as you want isnt something you should follow. Best way to do it from my knowledge, is to carry around with you a big bottle of water and just sip it through out the day. Knowing how much protein I intake in a day, I consume roughly a galon (4 litres). But you can consume too much water. Some ppl go over board and there is such a thing called water intoxication. You do have to drink a **** load of it though in order to have that. But basically, water is obviously essential in life but especially with bodybuilders, who intake large amounts of protein a day, need to flush out their kidneys and keep them clean which is a good reason why the demand of water consumption is higher for bodybuilders of all types.