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ArchAngel777
03-22-2006, 08:11 AM
Anyone ever heard of Salba? I guess it is a "super-grain" touted to be extremely nutritious. I guess it is a mixture of several grains or what not...

Well, the only reason I am asking is because 1) I know very little of this product 2) A friend of mine asked me about it and I wasn't too sure of it.

I suspect hype... Even if their claims are not hype, I don't see how it will change the way foods are made. I called BS on the product, personally.

Let me know if I am wrong...

TheGimp
03-22-2006, 10:18 AM
Never heard of it but I was interested so I googled and wikipediaed it.

It's the ground seeds of a plant in the mint family. It's high in protein, fibre and omega-3 fatty acids.

http://www.salba.info/salba.php

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chia

Holto
03-22-2006, 11:04 AM
That sounds pretty interesting. Our ancestors ate alot more seeds than grains.

ArchAngel777
03-22-2006, 11:17 AM
Yeah, I knew that much about the product (I googled it too). My thinking though, is why not just use flax seed oil with a burger? You know? I guess what I am really thinking is that, we already have the health benifits of this through different food sources already... So I see little importance of this super expensive grain. Thoughts? Comments? Etc...?

TheGimp
03-22-2006, 03:05 PM
Because flax oil is extremely delicate, should be stored in a fridge once opened and should under no circumstances be heated?

ArchAngel777
03-22-2006, 03:18 PM
Because flax oil is extremely delicate, should be stored in a fridge once opened and should under no circumstances be heated?

I am not sure, can it be heated? ;)

You don't need to take in much flax oil in the first place... Just a little in your shake and you are good to go! Many other methods to get your omegas too...

TheGimp
03-22-2006, 03:33 PM
Sure it's possible to heat it, one really shouldn't though ;)

Sounds like you've already made up your mind regarding this one!

ddegroff
03-22-2006, 04:30 PM
I believe flax seed oil is omega 6's. We get a lot of omega 6's through diet, to balance out the 6/3 ratio we take fish oil to get the om 3's (of course if you eat a lot of fish you can get them through diet). So this Salba stuff would be like a supplement of om 3's without the fish oil.

i don't see why you couldnt heat flax, its just oil isnt it.

ArchAngel777
03-22-2006, 04:39 PM
Sure it's possible to heat it, one really shouldn't though ;)

Sounds like you've already made up your mind regarding this one!

Nope, not really. Just curious. I know I could go to the store, purchase a bottle of omega 3 and 6 fatties and pop it. I just think it would be cheaper and easier in the end, personally. Plus, I do eat plenty of fish, salmon especially...

Mr. D
03-22-2006, 08:30 PM
Flax oil is omega 3, the only plant source of it (and well walnuts). Flax oil CANNOT be heated.

TheGimp
03-23-2006, 01:42 AM
I believe flax seed oil is omega 6's.

Approximately 66% of the fat in flax seed oil is polyunsaturated. 53% of the total fat is omega-3s, while the remaining 13% is omega-6.


i don't see why you couldnt heat flax, its just oil isnt it.

You can heat it if you want to destroy it.

Might want to avoid speculation in the future.


Don't use flax oil for cooking. Oils high in essential fatty acids are not good for cooking. In fact, heat can turn these healthy fats into harmful ones. Add flax oil to foods after cooking and just before serving.


Flax oil should not be exposed to direct heat, as in frying or sautéing, as this will damage the oil.


FLAX (LINSEED) OIL is readily denatured by oxygen, heat, and light. That's why it is used in paint.


Can I cook with flax oil?

No! This is because flax oil contains omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids which are highly unstable at high temperatures. Cooking with flax oil will cause the oil to turn rancid, and produce potentially harmful trans fatty acids. Flax oil can be added to the diet in many different ways including salad dressings, blender drinks, yogurt and cooked cereal.


Flax seed oil is not suitable as a cooking oil because it oxidizes at normal cooking temperatures.


Fresh flax oil has a nice nutty taste. If it tastes bad or rancid then this proof enough that it is not fresh. You can use it with cereals or as a salad oil - but not as a cooking oil. Because you do not want to destroy the EFAs.


EFAs are very unstable and will break down into very unhealthy compounds when exposed to light, oxygen, and heat. For example, flax oil provides us with both EFAs: linoleic acid (omega 6) and alpha-linoleic (omega 3). Cooking with flax oil is NOT RECOMMENDED because these EFAs will break down very rapidly into various toxic compounds including "free radicals", thus turning a good oil BAD!

A small sample of what you can find while searching for "flax oil cooking" on Google.

manowar669
03-23-2006, 06:45 AM
I am not sure, can it be heated? ;)

You don't need to take in much flax oil in the first place... Just a little in your shake and you are good to go! Many other methods to get your omegas too...

Flax oil does not contain the required essential omega-3 fats (EPA/DHA), but a precursor to it (ALA). The conversion is inefficient at around 11%. Flaxseed oil isn't 100% ALA (I forget the percentage, but I did the math once), but to get a required dose of Omega-3 fats, you would need to get around 7 tablespoons of Flaxseed oil (980 calories). Fish oil is better. 90 cals, or 9 gel caps will do ya. Unless of course you're vegan, or allergic to fish.

TheGimp
03-23-2006, 07:32 AM
Flaxseed oil isn't 100% ALA (I forget the percentage, but I did the math once)


Approximately 66% of the fat in flax seed oil is polyunsaturated. 53% of the total fat is omega-3s, while the remaining 13% is omega-6.


Unless of course you're vegan, or allergic to fish.

Or a vegetarian.

manowar669
03-23-2006, 07:37 AM
Thanks, but when it says 53% is omega-3, it really is 53% ALA, so only around 5% of that can be converted to EPA/DHA which is the essential fatty acid. Where's Built when I need her?

TheGimp
03-23-2006, 07:45 AM
Thanks, but when it says 53% is omega-3, it really is 53% ALA, so only around 5% of that can be converted to EPA/DHA which is the essential fatty acid. Where's Built when I need her?

Absolutely. 53% ALA, 13% LA.

manowar669
03-23-2006, 10:21 AM
Anyway, 53% of the total fat is ALA. You need 3+ grams of EPA/DHA per day. ALA must be converted to EPA/DHA, but only around 11% of the ALA will make the conversion.

1 tbsp Flax oil contains approx 7g ALA. After conversion, you get about 0.7g EPA/DHA. 3g+/0.7g=over 4 Tbsp Flax oil to meet your EPA/DHA requirements. Over 560 calories of fat. No problem, unless you are on a tight calorie budget (cutting). Or you could take 9g of fish oil, at only 90 cals.

Bruise Brubaker
03-23-2006, 10:41 AM
11% is a number that really mean nothing.

The enzyme responsible for converting ALA to DHA/EPA, is the same that convert LA to the animal omega 6's. So if you eat too much omega 6, you'll suck at converting ALA. I know that trans fats also inhibit that enzymes. There are probably many other factors too.
It is strongly believed that our ancestors ate a high ratio of omega 3 to 6. Nowadays, people eat a lot of grains and their oil, some legums like peanut too, have very low ratio of omega 3 to 6. Game meat or meat and milk from grass-fed bovine animals and fishes is high in omega 3, while the way most beef and cow are raised today make it lower. Also, we usually only eat muscle meat, and lack a lot of good stuff from organs. We need omega 3 for our brain: brain is a rich source of omega 3.

There is also the possibility that there are people who don't even have the genes to make that converting enzyme.

manowar669
03-23-2006, 12:05 PM
11% is a number that really mean nothing.

The enzyme responsible for converting ALA to DHA/EPA, is the same that convert LA to the animal omega 6's. So if you eat too much omega 6, you'll suck at converting ALA. I know that trans fats also inhibit that enzymes. There are probably many other factors too.
It is strongly believed that our ancestors ate a high ratio of omega 3 to 6. Nowadays, people eat a lot of grains and their oil, some legums like peanut too, have very low ratio of omega 3 to 6. Game meat or meat and milk from grass-fed bovine animals and fishes is high in omega 3, while the way most beef and cow are raised today make it lower. Also, we usually only eat muscle meat, and lack a lot of good stuff from organs. We need omega 3 for our brain: brain is a rich source of omega 3.

There is also the possibility that there are people who don't even have the genes to make that converting enzyme.

True, that's just an average, many people may need to consume more ALA/LA to get the required omega-3 than stated above. Once again, the cheaper, more calorie-efficient way to get enough Omega-3 fats is fish oil (or just eat salmon, mackerel, sardines, etc.) as opposed to flax oil, unless restricted by belief (vegan/vegetarian) or health requirements (allergies, etc.). Of course extra calories may be beneficial (bulking, hard gainer, etc.).

ddegroff
03-23-2006, 02:03 PM
Approximately 66% of the fat in flax seed oil is polyunsaturated. 53% of the total fat is omega-3s, while the remaining 13% is omega-6.



You can heat it if you want to destroy it.

Might want to avoid speculation in the future.


Thats what I was told by the cute girl at GNC. i asked the difference btw flax and fish and thats what she told me. Thank you for clearing that up.

as far as heating it goes, stupid comment on my part. I was thinking along the lines of denaturing protein helps with digestion etc. Thanks for clearing that up also.

Built
03-23-2006, 02:09 PM
Flax oil does not contain the required essential omega-3 fats (EPA/DHA), but a precursor to it (ALA). The conversion is inefficient at around 11%. Flaxseed oil isn't 100% ALA (I forget the percentage, but I did the math once), but to get a required dose of Omega-3 fats, you would need to get around 7 tablespoons of Flaxseed oil (980 calories). Fish oil is better. 90 cals, or 9 gel caps will do ya. Unless of course you're vegan, or allergic to fish.


Yep. That's why I take my 10g of fish oil instead of taking flax oil. More bang for my calorie-buck.