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View Full Version : Cold environment to burn more calories?



ArchAngel777
03-23-2006, 02:22 PM
This isn't a serious question in the sense that I thought of doing it. But it has been said that our calories are burned off through the heating of the body, at least, that is one major way they are. So, in order to keep our body heated at a certain level (98.6 degrees) one would think being in an environment where you body had to work harder to keep itself warm would increase energy expended.

So the question is, would someone with the same clothing burn more calories in 55 degree weather as they would with 70 degree weather? If not, then why? It would have to work harder to keep itself warmer, which in turn would use energy.

Just some thoughts is all.... I had a hard time deciding what forum this should go in.

silentdragonx
03-23-2006, 03:14 PM
My mom says the same thing, I dont know if its true or not but it makes sense.

russianwol
03-23-2006, 03:43 PM
You know on a side note I noticed that I sleep better if my room is heated up to like 76 or maybe more degrees. I have a space heater and leave it on through the night sometimes. When I wake up and start moving around - the room feels extremely hot but not when I sleep. So maybe the calorie burning idea works here somehow.

betastas
03-23-2006, 04:24 PM
Yes. You will burn more calories appropriate to the temperature. Shivering is an active atempt by the body to warm itself. If you have ever been in the cold for an extended period of time (IE, walking around the city in a jacket that is too thin in the winter for six hours :bash: ) then you will feel very weak and tired due to energy loss. Conservation of energy occurs and you will burn more energy to maintain a constant temperature.

ArchAngel777
03-23-2006, 06:44 PM
Yes. You will burn more calories appropriate to the temperature. Shivering is an active atempt by the body to warm itself. If you have ever been in the cold for an extended period of time (IE, walking around the city in a jacket that is too thin in the winter for six hours :bash: ) then you will feel very weak and tired due to energy loss. Conservation of energy occurs and you will burn more energy to maintain a constant temperature.

Hmm, interesting. I wonder if there have been any articles on something like this... I wouldn't even know where to search for such an odd topic. Then, technically, you can increase your BMR (sort of) through this means. Interestingly though, people in colder climates tend to carry more body fat than those in warmer climates... Possibly due to lacking of movement due to cold weather? Or is it possible at some level that the body is told to store fat if someone lives in a cold climate?

I am always curious to see how things affect someone's energy output levels.

betastas
03-23-2006, 06:54 PM
I think that some of it is cultural and habitual. After all, in a cold climate you will be less likely to spend active time outside. In modern society, it is really the genetics and diet that play the biggest role. Inuit people tend to be more endomorphic, but they aren't necessarily ruled out from a 6-pack. I am not a biologist or a bio-chemist (perhaps our resident biochemist can contribute here), so take what I say with a grain of salt.

I live in a colder climate (Canada). One thing that I have noticed empirically - I am leaner than many people, and I am much warmer too. I think this is due to my higher BMR, which in turn allows for more heat production "waste". Other lean people experience this too. I have also met fat people who are cold. It seems that the most important factors are proper diet and circulation improvements through exercise.

nhlfan
03-23-2006, 09:04 PM
my friend once had to lose 10 pounds overnight for wrestling, and did this by opening all his windows in -10 celcius weather, and sleeping in only boxer shorts, with only a sheet for covering.

obviously not even close to all of this is due to the cold though.