PDA

View Full Version : How much protein can the body digest



weightliftguy
03-28-2006, 02:20 PM
I was just wondering. In my biology class at college i remember the professor saying that anything more than 20 grams was to much because of the amount of enzymes present for the substraite, or something to that regards. So does anyone know if thats true and if so why you see weight gainers with 54 grams of protein present?

getfit
03-28-2006, 02:33 PM
i was just reading through this this morning

http://tuberose.com/Digestion.html

weightliftguy
03-28-2006, 02:40 PM
I must say you look like your doing great with your training. Very impressive. Thanks again.

Davidelmo
03-28-2006, 04:01 PM
i was just reading through this this morning

http://tuberose.com/Digestion.html

I can't see anywhere that answers the question :confused:

ShockBoxer
03-28-2006, 05:00 PM
What I get from the article is that asking 'how much protein can the body digest' is like asking how much fat can the body digest and how much carbohydrates can the body digest.

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-28-2006, 05:44 PM
It's different for each person so there's no generalized number to work with.

Built
03-28-2006, 05:50 PM
Weird question, but I'll ask it:

Couldn't one measure what is going in, and analyze what's going out, to see how much actually gets digested?

Davidelmo
03-28-2006, 05:55 PM
I do "hear" from time to time (i.e. people spouting on message boards (so take this with a HUGE grain of salt)) various figures of ~40-60g protein being the most your body can 'put to use' at any one time.

No idea if it's true or not, but I prefer to spread my daily 200g protein out over the day and get it with every meal. I can't think of any time when I'd take in >60g in one go - not even after a workout.

I've always believed that whatever goes in and doesn't come out in your faeces has been digested, absorbed and put to use somehow. Whether or not that protein is put towards muscle is another matter altogether.

betastas
03-28-2006, 06:25 PM
It seems like it may depend on your size. A 5' tall 95 lb person probably doesn't have the digestive tract large enough to handle a lot of protein. Someone who is 6' and 200+ lbs may be able to handle more due to having a larger system. I guess it really comes down to how much you can eat :D

Eating too much at one time probably leads to the body just chucking the extra out.

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-28-2006, 06:41 PM
It seems like it may depend on your size. A 5' tall 95 lb person probably doesn't have the digestive tract large enough to handle a lot of protein. Someone who is 6' and 200+ lbs may be able to handle more due to having a larger system. I guess it really comes down to how much you can eatI don't see how you can base that on how much one can eat.

betastas
03-28-2006, 06:49 PM
Well, what I meant is that you will reach your maximum if you eat more than your body can absorb. It is a surefire way to reach it, but I meant it more as a nonsensical statement.

ShockBoxer
03-28-2006, 07:35 PM
If your body could only 'digest' x amount of protein at one time then drinking 6000 calories a day worth of protein shakes would never have you gain weight. Hell, drink 12,000.... 15.... 45,000! Your body will take what it needs and the rest will be 'undigested' which means that after a saturation point calories from protein in a meal don't count.

If only that were true...

kad
03-28-2006, 07:40 PM
I've *heard* that anything above 50g at a time brings diminishing returns, as in your body uses less the higher you go, with 80g at one sitting being the upper limit. Like Davidelmo said though, take that with a grain of salt, because I don't have any supporting evidence to back it up. Just my two cents.

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-28-2006, 07:44 PM
drinking 6000 calories a day worth of protein shakes would never have you gain weight.Of course you'll gain weight. What are you talking about? :scratch:

Slim Schaedle
03-28-2006, 07:52 PM
I am just waiting for smalls to post a nice, respectful comment concerning all this.

ShockBoxer
03-28-2006, 07:52 PM
Of course you'll gain weight. What are you talking about? :scratch:

I was using a hyperbolic example to illustrate my position that there's no limit to the amount of protein a body can digest at one time... because if there was then you couldn't gain weight eating pure protein. Your body would saturate at one of these hypothetical limits (like that 20 per meal, meaning if you drank 1000 grams of protein for 4000 cals only 80 would be used by the body and the rest would be crapped out.) so you'd never gain weight.

I'm of the opinion, largely uninformed, that your body will digest anything it can. How could it do otherwise? Now, that's not saying there's not a limit on how much protein is used for a given biological process that I'm not aware of but my contension is with the hypothesis that after a certain level protein goes 'undigested'.

Built
03-28-2006, 07:54 PM
I am just waiting for smalls to post a nice, respectful comment concerning all this.

Bwahahahahahahahaha!

<blows kisses at smalls, whose reputation preceeds him>

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-28-2006, 08:06 PM
meaning if you drank 1000 grams of protein for 4000 cals only 80 would be used by the body and the rest would be crapped out.) so you'd never gain weight.It's either used for muscles, converted to glucose, stored as fat, or released by the body as waste.



but my contension is with the hypothesis that after a certain level protein goes 'undigested'.Contension isn't a word.

Built
03-28-2006, 08:08 PM
I think he means contention

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=contention

silentdragonx
03-28-2006, 08:12 PM
wow I did not know there was a limit...(shows how informed I am)

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-28-2006, 08:13 PM
@ Built: That makes more sense. But it's not a debate. The body will use as much protein as it needs for various purposes and excess will either be converted in the body or excreted as waste. Protein is the only one out of the three (protein, carbs, fat) that doesn't have it's own place for storage. Fat has an unlimited storage and carbs has multiple places for storage [liver and muscles], but has a limit that is varied upon the individual.

Slim Schaedle
03-28-2006, 08:22 PM
It's either used for muscles, converted to glucose, stored as fat, or released by the body as waste.
Well.....and transport proteins, immunoproteins, enzymes, structural proteins, nonstructural tissue proteins and nitrogen containing compounds, plasma proteins, peptide hormones, and protein secretions that form digestive enzymes and endogenous proteins for use in digestion. :windup:

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-28-2006, 08:30 PM
^^

And all the other ten million functions that protein serves in the body. I know this so no stick-poking needed. ;) I didn't feel like getting into the immense biologicial aspect of protein usage in the body.

Slim Schaedle
03-28-2006, 08:36 PM
^^

And all the other ten million functions that protein serves in the body. I know this so no stick-poking needed. ;) I didn't feel like getting into the immense biologicial aspect of protein usage in the body.
I know, just giving you some hell. :clown:

Slim Schaedle
03-28-2006, 08:39 PM
PS: I am getting a small intestine transplant/addition so I can digest more protein.

Or, I will get some of this ... http://www.wannabebigforums.com/showthread.php?t=76641

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-28-2006, 08:41 PM
PS: I am getting a small intestine transplant/addition so I can digest more protein. Was that a joke or are you serious? LOL. Sometimes I can't cut through your sarcasm.

ShockBoxer
03-28-2006, 09:09 PM
I think he means contention

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=contention

If that's the only spelling error I made in that post I'm impressed.

Slim Schaedle
03-28-2006, 10:13 PM
Was that a joke or are you serious? LOL. Sometimes I can't cut through your sarcasm.
haha, sorry...a joke. Someone mentioned larger people having greater digestion abilty because of longer (I guess) intestines.

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-28-2006, 10:17 PM
I don't think the length of the intestines varies much between individuals. :/