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Turnip
03-29-2006, 01:25 AM
Why do people drink this stuff, I hear of people taking shots of it or something alot on this forum. And is there a certain kind you should drink or is it any ordinary olive oil?

Built
03-29-2006, 01:29 AM
They drink it for the cals.

Extra virgin is healthiest.

Turnip
03-29-2006, 01:38 AM
ah sorry about sticking it in a stupid place dont know what I was thinking, thanks for the help.

Built
03-29-2006, 01:39 AM
NP - it was a reasonable question.

getfit
03-29-2006, 01:39 AM
i moved the thread to diet/nutrition

MJS
03-29-2006, 03:57 AM
I add olive oil to everything ... I like the texture it provides and the slick fatty feel without the trans or sats.

TheLittleGuy
03-29-2006, 04:21 AM
Extra virgin is healthiest.

Virgin olive oil is one of the few oils that can be eaten without chemical processing. (Nearly every other vegetable oil has not been detoxified and refined with steam and solvents). Fresh pressed olive oil can be eaten immediately and retains the natural flavors, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and other healthy products of the ripe olive fruit.

Extra virgin may have the best flavor, but I wasn't aware that it possessed any extra health benefits. The "virgin" part just talks about whether it comes from the first or second pressings of the same olives:


Extra-virgin: derived from the first pressing of the olives (has the most delicate flavor).
Fine virgin: created from the second pressing of the olives.
Refined oil: unlike extra-virgin and fine virgin olive oils, which only use mechanical means to press the oil, refined oil is created by using chemicals to extract the oil from the olives.
Pure oil: a bit of a misnomer, it indicates oil that is a blend of refined and virgin olive oils.


It's the last two you've got to look out for (although they're not widely sold in the US, as the market demands virgin olive oil).

Holto
03-29-2006, 09:00 AM
I add olive oil to everything ... I like the texture it provides and the slick fatty feel without the trans or sats.

What's wrong with sat fat?

TheLittleGuy
03-29-2006, 11:16 AM
What's wrong with sat fat?

Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saturated_fat) is your friend. It briefly presents both the "health risk" and the "flawed studies" argument:

Health issues
Diets high in saturated fat correlate in some studies with an increased incidence of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Some studies suggest replacing saturated fats in the diet with unsaturated fats will increase one's ratio of HDL to LDL serum cholesterol.

Controversy
It has been alleged that the many studies of saturated fat in the diet do not distinguish between saturated fat and trans fat. Some claim that saturated fat (in the absence of trans fat) is healthful; for example, foods such as peanuts and pure peanut butter (peanut butter having no added partially hydrogenated vegetable oil) contain saturated fat but no trans fat. Such foods may be beneficial or may be a health hazard; no research specific to this question has as yet been done.

Also, it has been pointed out that meat and dairy foods contain some naturally-occurring trans fatty acids. It is unknown whether or not they cause heart disease. Some researchers [1] claim that there are "good" trans fatty acids, such as conjugated linoleic acid.

Holto
03-29-2006, 11:24 AM
Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saturated_fat) is your friend. It briefly presents both the "health risk" and the "flawed studies" argument:

Health issues
Diets high in saturated fat correlate in some studies with an increased incidence of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Some studies suggest replacing saturated fats in the diet with unsaturated fats will increase one's ratio of HDL to LDL serum cholesterol.

Controversy
It has been alleged that the many studies of saturated fat in the diet do not distinguish between saturated fat and trans fat. Some claim that saturated fat (in the absence of trans fat) is healthful; for example, foods such as peanuts and pure peanut butter (peanut butter having no added partially hydrogenated vegetable oil) contain saturated fat but no trans fat. Such foods may be beneficial or may be a health hazard; no research specific to this question has as yet been done.

Also, it has been pointed out that meat and dairy foods contain some naturally-occurring trans fatty acids. It is unknown whether or not they cause heart disease. Some researchers [1] claim that there are "good" trans fatty acids, such as conjugated linoleic acid.


Thanks, but I've been studying nutrition for 15yrs. I wanted to know what he thought was wrong with it.

235orbust
03-29-2006, 05:21 PM
lol i love the irony. The musclebuilding website probably has some of the smartest people on the web

TheLittleGuy
03-30-2006, 10:38 AM
Thanks, but I've been studying nutrition for 15yrs. I wanted to know what he thought was wrong with it.

I suspect it had something to do with the issues raised above. ;)

Answering questions on boards like this are a mine-field. You can never tell whether someone is a clueless newbie or a 15-year nutrition specialist. So I went with the middle-of-the-road answer, and hopefully didn't upset either. :)

If anyone needs me, I'll be in the corner with my DUNCE hat on.

TheLittleGuy
03-30-2006, 10:39 AM
lol i love the irony. The musclebuilding website probably has some of the smartest people on the web

You should see the idiots over on the MENSA board.

Holto
03-30-2006, 11:57 AM
I suspect it had something to do with the issues raised above. ;)

Answering questions on boards like this are a mine-field. You can never tell whether someone is a clueless newbie or a 15-year nutrition specialist. So I went with the middle-of-the-road answer, and hopefully didn't upset either. :)


Good point.