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View Full Version : What are the primary muscles invloved in a baseball swing?



Patz
04-05-2006, 11:23 AM
I might be playing softball, and while I know I'm i better shape than I ever was when I played Babe Ruth league 10 years ago, I'd still like to prepare my body for it. I do intend to do some batting cage work and all, but what are the primary muscles in the swing?

It seems like lats/obliques and leg drive, along with a snap from the forearms and triceps.

dubdoob
04-05-2006, 11:31 AM
Hips(Cleans, Squats, Snatch). Besides that getting overall stronger, and most importantly Neural Efficiency for the movement. I never played baseball, but I was a ton stronger than everykid on our highschool baseball team. Yet everyone of those kids could hit the ball about 40 yards more than I could, why? Neural Efficiency.

Bohizzle
04-05-2006, 12:01 PM
at the gym, grab a cable and do some swings with a weight that's comfortable, i'm sure that'd help ur power in ur swing, or maybe swing around a heavier bat fro a while..

dubdoob
04-05-2006, 01:09 PM
at the gym, grab a cable and do some swings with a weight that's comfortable, i'm sure that'd help ur power in ur swing, or maybe swing around a heavier bat fro a while..This is actually a myth. Adding anything weighted that is directly related to the movement actually hampers the biomechanics behind the move, resulting in sabotage of your form.

dw06wu
04-05-2006, 02:36 PM
Like a lot of things, technique definitely beats strength in a baseball swing.

Bohizzle
04-05-2006, 03:24 PM
This is actually a myth. Adding anything weighted that is directly related to the movement actually hampers the biomechanics behind the move, resulting in sabotage of your form.
my bad.. i was unaware of this, i just took a guess.

dubdoob
04-05-2006, 04:06 PM
my bad.. i was unaware of this, i just took a guess.It's cool, I used to think the same thing.

Maki Riddington
04-05-2006, 04:55 PM
I might be playing softball, and while I know I'm i better shape than I ever was when I played Babe Ruth league 10 years ago, I'd still like to prepare my body for it. I do intend to do some batting cage work and all, but what are the primary muscles in the swing?

It seems like lats/obliques and leg drive, along with a snap from the forearms and triceps.

One suggestion to increase your swinging power even though you didn't ask is to do a variety of diagnol chopping motions and pure rotational movements.

You can use med balls, bands, a power sling or a tornado ball which is a kick ass piece of equipment to train the obliques and increase your explosive rotational power.

MixmasterNash
04-05-2006, 05:45 PM
This is actually a myth. Adding anything weighted that is directly related to the movement actually hampers the biomechanics behind the move, resulting in sabotage of your form.
This isn't quite true. Adding a small amount of weight and performing a given movement at full speed can help. Also, using heavy weight and performing slower (or partial) versions of the movements can be beneficial without compromising form. It also takes a fair amount of time to "sabotage" your form by performing the movement with added weights.

Moreover, I wouldn't worry about it unless you're a professional athlete.

Patz
04-06-2006, 02:08 PM
One suggestion to increase your swinging power even though you didn't ask is to do a variety of diagnol chopping motions and pure rotational movements.

You can use med balls, bands, a power sling or a tornado ball which is a kick ass piece of equipment to train the obliques and increase your explosive rotational power.

Is that a weighted ball on a rope or length of something, with a handle, and you just spin?

Maki Riddington
04-06-2006, 02:11 PM
Yes, however you don't spin it. You slam it while rotating the torso.

Patz
04-06-2006, 04:45 PM
Hmmm...

I'm quite sure we don't have anything like that..lol

Hazerboy
04-06-2006, 07:29 PM
This is actually a myth. Adding anything weighted that is directly related to the movement actually hampers the biomechanics behind the move, resulting in sabotage of your form.

ah yes, I have heard this many times before, but it is still hard to disprove the "gym room" logic of many of my fellow wrestling lifters who want to train shots with a weighted vest or something. Was is the scientific reason behind this, or something simple that simple that one could give to the kid throwing around a 10lb medicine ball in the weightroom trying to "get a better throw."

Sensei
04-08-2006, 01:39 AM
I think everything's been covered, but if you are looking to strengthen your swing, I would be doing a lot of squats (or Bulgarian split squats and lunges), rotational work (like Russian twists, chopping exercises), obliques (side bends, saxon side bends), and wrist work (wrist roller, leverage bar) in addition to regular training.

Meat_Head
04-08-2006, 02:23 PM
I would guess that you already have more than enough strength to hit a baseball far. People consider strength a big factor in hitting in baseball... but its not. If you really want to improve your hitting, your hitting skill is the only thing you need to worry about(considering that you're already lifting regularly). If you learn to coordinate your strength correctly, the ball will fly.

Look at Babe Ruth... he wasn't exceptionally strong or in shape at all, yet he slammed balls out of the park all the time. Today guys pump themselves full of anabolics, wear braces on their joints, wear contact lenses to help them see the ball better, and all kinds of ridiculous stuff. Anyone who takes roids for baseball is a dip**** in my opinion, if you have trouble hitting the only thing that's really going to make you better is practicing that skill.

BCC
04-08-2006, 05:34 PM
I would guess that you already have more than enough strength to hit a baseball far. People consider strength a big factor in hitting in baseball... but its not. If you really want to improve your hitting, your hitting skill is the only thing you need to worry about(considering that you're already lifting regularly). If you learn to coordinate your strength correctly, the ball will fly.

Look at Babe Ruth... he wasn't exceptionally strong or in shape at all, yet he slammed balls out of the park all the time. Today guys pump themselves full of anabolics, wear braces on their joints, wear contact lenses to help them see the ball better, and all kinds of ridiculous stuff. Anyone who takes roids for baseball is a dip**** in my opinion, if you have trouble hitting the only thing that's really going to make you better is practicing that skill.

Yeah, all these dumbasses in the MLB, what are they thinking taking steroids, they're not even helping them.

f=ma
04-08-2006, 05:51 PM
lol

Meat_Head
04-08-2006, 06:16 PM
Yeah, all these dumbasses in the MLB, what are they thinking taking steroids, they're not even helping them.

You're missing the point. Those dumbasses could be doing it without the anabolics. People have been doing it for ages without roids, what do you have to say about fatass out of shape Babe Ruth? Steroids make sense for a sport that actually requires a significant amount of strength and speed... that sport is not baseball.

Hitting a baseball far is 90% coordination, 10% strength. That strength can easily be attained in the weight room naturally.

Patz
04-08-2006, 06:31 PM
Babe Ruth nailed the ball because he was a fatass that displaced his weight amazingly well.

It's no coinidence that the best long-ball hitters in history were all in excess of 200lbs. Ruth, McGwire, Mantle, Galaragga een put a few at the 600ft mark. Plenty of other guys, like Maris, Hank Aaron, Griffey (skinny Griffey), and skinny Bonds were homerun hitters, but never with the consistent distance of the big guys.



I can already crush a ball--that's not the real issue here. I just don't want to start playing, and get ridiculously sore, or pull a muscle when I could have prepped myself a little bit. I wanted to strengthen the primary muscles involved in the swing so they'd be ready for the explosive movement.

Chesticles
04-08-2006, 08:47 PM
A baseball swing all starts with the legs, you load with your back leg and step with your front leg. Then to your hips and core where you coil and uncoil for the lack of a better word. Followed by a follow through with your arms. Forearms arms are under looked alot, you need strong forearms because this is where your bat speed comes from and also is what you use to power through the ball on contact, followed by strong wrists so your hands don't roll over on contact, but they will roll over on your follow through. Baseball/Softball is alot of stop and go with very quick movements, at the first of the season it can take a while to get your body used to quick movements and throwing hard, etc.... I suggest some drills with sprints and quick takeoffs, and warm up your arm so your shoulder don't be hurting later after you throw.

Sensei
04-09-2006, 12:19 AM
I would guess that you already have more than enough strength to hit a baseball far. People consider strength a big factor in hitting in baseball... but its not. If you really want to improve your hitting, your hitting skill is the only thing you need to worry about(considering that you're already lifting regularly). If you learn to coordinate your strength correctly, the ball will fly.
Having prerequisite skills is a given. Being strong and fast is certainly not going to hurt anyone's swing.

Steroids make sense for a sport that actually requires a significant amount of strength and speed... that sport is not baseball.
Baseball doesn't require strength and speed???? I understand what you mean, but you are greatly oversimplifying things.

Meat_Head
04-09-2006, 12:42 AM
Having prerequisite skills is a given. Being strong and fast is certainly not going to hurt anyone's swing.


I never suggested that it would. I said its a skill game, and that the level of strength and conditioning required to be successful is low in comparison to almost all sports.



Baseball doesn't require strength and speed???? I understand what you mean, but you are greatly oversimplifying things.

No, you are oversimplifying what I said:

"Steroids make sense for a sport that actually requires a significant amount of strength and speed... that sport is not baseball."



Babe Ruth nailed the ball because he was a fatass that displaced his weight amazingly well.


There's a bit more to it than that, as you know. I know lots of fat guys that displace their weight well, yet couldn't hit a well pitched baseball for ****.



It's no coinidence that the best long-ball hitters in history were all in excess of 200lbs. Ruth, McGwire, Mantle, Galaragga een put a few at the 600ft mark. Plenty of other guys, like Maris, Hank Aaron, Griffey (skinny Griffey), and skinny Bonds were homerun hitters, but never with the consistent distance of the big guys.


I don't find the weight of an athlete being in excess of 200lbs as suprising. Its really not hard to get there at all for most guys, given a year or 2 of good training/diet. Some guys naturally weigh that or more, but they aren't all great home run hitters...



I can already crush a ball--that's not the real issue here. I just don't want to start playing, and get ridiculously sore, or pull a muscle when I could have prepped myself a little bit. I wanted to strengthen the primary muscles involved in the swing so they'd be ready for the explosive movement.


Word, you have everything you need then. One arm snatches would be optimal in my opinion, as they train lower body, back, shoulders, core(including rotational muscles to some degree), and numerous strength qualities.

Sensei
04-09-2006, 12:53 AM
I never suggested that it would. I said its a skill game, and that the level of strength and conditioning required to be successful is low in comparison to almost all sports.

No, you are oversimplifying what I said:

"Steroids make sense for a sport that actually requires a significant amount of strength and speed... that sport is not baseball."
Oh gawd, here we go again. What do you mean then? That being strong and fast is not an advantage in baseball? That to be good at baseball all you need is hand-eye coordination and technique?

I am not oversimplifying your statement. You're statement is as oversimplified as it can be! Of course mechanics is all-important. No one has said otherwise, but to dismiss power from the equation is ludicrous.

Patz
04-10-2006, 12:53 PM
I don't find the weight of an athlete being in excess of 200lbs as suprising. Its really not hard to get there at all for most guys, given a year or 2 of good training/diet. Some guys naturally weigh that or more, but they aren't all great home run hitters...

I understand your point here, but I think you missed mine. I was referring to the LONG BALL homerun hitters. Guys like pre-muscles Bonds and Griffey were putting it over the fence using a great eye and perfect mechanics, but the BIG guys who had those same skills and gifts were the ones hitting in excess of 550ft on a regular basis. now that Bonds and Griffey are jacked, they're doing it too. I remember McGwire putting 3 balls over the Green Monser in one game during his record-breaking season (if I remember correctly). It was incredible. That guy was hitting MOON SHOTS in his prime.


It's also no coincidence that guys like John Daly can hit the ball farther than most glofers. The golfers consistently hitting the long drive are the ones that either workout (like Tiger and Duvall), or are fat (Daly, and the Queen of the female shots..Laura Davies). All beasts..all great mechanics and coordination on top of it.

Meat_Head
04-10-2006, 01:05 PM
I see what you're saying mrel, to hit the ball THAT far you gotta be a beast.


Oh gawd, here we go again. What do you mean then? That being strong and fast is not an advantage in baseball? That to be good at baseball all you need is hand-eye coordination and technique?


Is it an advantage? Rarely, but ya.

And yes, all you need to be good at baseball are hand-eye coordination and technique. Now obviously a 500lb fat dude or a concentration camp victim are not going to be able to hit a home run regardless of technique and coordination, but any average person could be great at baseball if they master coordination and technique.



I am not oversimplifying your statement. You're statement is as oversimplified as it can be! Of course mechanics is all-important. No one has said otherwise, but to dismiss power from the equation is ludicrous.

I never said power isn't helpful, I said excessive power isn't NECISSARY at all for baseball. It hardly plays a role in comparison to the importance of skills training. Honestly, I could get a baseball player with no lifting experience where he needs to be as far as strength and conditioning in under 3 or 4 months.

Sensei
04-10-2006, 02:33 PM
Is it an advantage? Rarely, but ya.
And yes, all you need to be good at baseball are hand-eye coordination and technique. Now obviously a 500lb fat dude or a concentration camp victim are not going to be able to hit a home run regardless of technique and coordination, but any average person could be great at baseball if they master coordination and technique.You could look at it as simply semantics, but the generation of strength (and power) is a skill. If your technique sucks, you will not be able to generate power, period. BUT, if you don't have a modicum of strength and speed, you will not be able to compete with high level athletes. The Babe Ruth argument might work for athletes 50 years ago, or company-league softball players, but not for modern athletes.

I never said power isn't helpful, I said excessive power isn't NECISSARY at all for baseball. It hardly plays a role in comparison to the importance of skills training. Again, no one said anything about skill not being essential. I don't know what you mean by "excessive power".

Honestly, I could get a baseball player with no lifting experience where he needs to be as far as strength and conditioning in under 3 or 4 months.Really? How many have you trained?

Maki Riddington
04-10-2006, 05:48 PM
Honestly, I could get a baseball player with no lifting experience where he needs to be as far as strength and conditioning in under 3 or 4 months.

That's a pretty big statement to be throwing around even on the Internet.

dw06wu
04-10-2006, 06:02 PM
Not to mention that increasing the distance of your swing is not the only reason to juice it while you're a professional baseball player. This isn't wiffle ball.

Meat_Head
04-10-2006, 10:12 PM
You could look at it as simply semantics, but the generation of strength (and power) is a skill. If your technique sucks, you will not be able to generate power, period.


I'm not talking about it as a skill, I'm talking about it as an element of fitness.



BUT, if you don't have a modicum of strength and speed, you will not be able to compete with high level athletes.


Again, baseball does not compare to many other sports in terms of demands on the body and the necessity of strength and speed. Today, athletes in general are miles from athletes of the past, and it is necissary for those athletes to continue to push physical boundaries to stay competitive. I do not believe it is a necessity to baseball, with the exception of a few physical SKILLS.



The Babe Ruth argument might work for athletes 50 years ago, or company-league softball players, but not for modern athletes.


I agree, pitching is on a whole different level. But physical strength and speed is hardly the reason baseball players from that era couldn't compete with baseball players from today. The gap in physical development (especially the physical development required to be competitive) is not large.



Again, no one said anything about skill not being essential. I don't know what you mean by "excessive power".


Take any major sport - soccer, football, wrestling, even tennis... they all require what I would call excessive power (in comparison to the average person). Baseball does not!



Really? How many have you trained?

I didn't say I trained any.

Let say you start with a pretty poor base:

Say the guy is 150lbs, bench presses 115lbs and squats 135lbs, has terrible speed and endurance. In 3 months, with a good comprehensive fitness and lifting program as well as diet, that could be turned into at least a 170lb athlete with a 200lb bench press and a 300lb squat without too much trouble. The major lifts - deadlifts, squats, overhead press, bench press, rows, pullups, etc. could all be significantly improved. Progression with olympic lifts and plyometrics to increase power output would be included. Short sprint intervals would be a part of training to take care of base running. All major muscle groups with an emphasis on the posterior chain and core muscles would be strengthened. Assuming that athlete already has the baseball skills needed (again I'm only talking about training physical speed/strength), that would be more than enough development to be a very good baseball player.



Not to mention that increasing the distance of your swing is not the only reason to juice it while you're a professional baseball player. This isn't wiffle ball.


I agree... there's that whole pitching thing. Of course that is a skill developed by practice, and I don't think steroids would have a significant effect at all... not to mention that most of the team DOESN'T pitch. You could also make the argument that anabolics could help with base running. This is I think where they would have the most potential benefit, but the potential still seems very low to me. You still gotta get a good hit to run, and there are very few close calls where being a few 10ths of a second faster on your 40 yard dash would make a difference.

Bohizzle
04-10-2006, 10:16 PM
u'd be able to improve a 135lb squat to a 300lb squat in 3 months? that's pretty impressive! maybe i should hire u as my personal trainer!

Andrew

CrazyK
04-10-2006, 10:32 PM
I'm not talking about it as a skill, I'm talking about it as an element of fitness.



Again, baseball does not compare to many other sports in terms of demands on the body and the necessity of strength and speed. Today, athletes in general are miles from athletes of the past, and it is necissary for those athletes to continue to push physical boundaries to stay competitive. I do not believe it is a necessity to baseball, with the exception of a few physical SKILLS.



I agree, pitching is on a whole different level. But physical strength and speed is hardly the reason baseball players from that era couldn't compete with baseball players from today. The gap in physical development (especially the physical development required to be competitive) is not large.



Take any major sport - soccer, football, wrestling, even tennis... they all require what I would call excessive power (in comparison to the average person). Baseball does not!



I didn't say I trained any.

Let say you start with a pretty poor base:

Say the guy is 150lbs, bench presses 115lbs and squats 135lbs, has terrible speed and endurance. In 3 months, with a good comprehensive fitness and lifting program as well as diet, that could be turned into at least a 170lb athlete with a 200lb bench press and a 300lb squat without too much trouble. The major lifts - deadlifts, squats, overhead press, bench press, rows, pullups, etc. could all be significantly improved. Progression with olympic lifts and plyometrics to increase power output would be included. Short sprint intervals would be a part of training to take care of base running. All major muscle groups with an emphasis on the posterior chain and core muscles would be strengthened. Assuming that athlete already has the baseball skills needed (again I'm only talking about training physical speed/strength), that would be more than enough development to be a very good baseball player.



I agree... there's that whole pitching thing. Of course that is a skill developed by practice, and I don't think steroids would have a significant effect at all... not to mention that most of the team DOESN'T pitch. You could also make the argument that anabolics could help with base running. This is I think where they would have the most potential benefit, but the potential still seems very low to me. You still gotta get a good hit to run, and there are very few close calls where being a few 10ths of a second faster on your 40 yard dash would make a difference.Everything being equal the stronger/faster athlete wins. End of discussion.

Meat_Head
04-10-2006, 10:34 PM
An athlete who on his very first trip to the weight room hits 135lbs could definately add that much weight to his max after learning proper technique, training the nervous system hard, improving power, and the obvious core and posterior chain strength that can be quickly improved with frequent heavy squats.

Think about it, a newbie lifter on a bulk doing 5x5 squats at least twice a week... he's going to gain ALOT. But 300lbs isn't the point, that's just a number I was throwing out there. I'd consider a good squat of 225-250lbs more than enough for BASEBALL.

Meat_Head
04-10-2006, 10:36 PM
Everything being equal the stronger/faster athlete wins. End of discussion.

True, but the problem is the everything else is NEVER equal. Since skill is by far the most significant factor in how well you do as a baseball player, the stronger/faster athlete is not necissarily better in this situation.

Magik
04-11-2006, 12:36 AM
OK it seems like strength is arguable but definately not speed, you need to have strong lower body muscle to and speed to be able to sprint especially for the guys who arent homerun hitters and have to sprint to 1st i mean there are plenty of positions in baseball where speed is essential, maybe its not necessary ot be a good homerun hitter but it is definately essential to baseball in general

CrazyK
04-11-2006, 03:04 AM
True, but the problem is the everything else is NEVER equal. Since skill is by far the most significant factor in how well you do as a baseball player, the stronger/faster athlete is not necissarily better in this situation.You're emphasizing technique too much. It only gets so good over time, in which case the way to up your game becomes to get bigger and stronger, i.e. Barry Bonds, Mark Mcguire, etc... You're thinking freshman in highschool terms and everyone else is thinking much higher.

Meat_Head
04-11-2006, 12:57 PM
You're emphasizing technique too much. It only gets so good over time, in which case the way to up your game becomes to get bigger and stronger, i.e. Barry Bonds, Mark Mcguire, etc... You're thinking freshman in highschool terms and everyone else is thinking much higher.

I never said extra speed and strength wouldn't help... I said it isn't necissary. Why does it matter wether you hit a 400 foot home run or a 550 foot one?

LC
04-11-2006, 01:41 PM
I never said extra speed and strength wouldn't help... I said it isn't necissary. Why does it matter wether you hit a 400 foot home run or a 550 foot one?


It doesnt matter in that case, but what about a 399 foot pop fly compared to a 400 foot home run.

Patz
04-11-2006, 03:26 PM
Ha! Touche..

My bowling game has improved dramatically since I got strong.

Sensei
04-11-2006, 03:31 PM
Ha! Touche..

My bowling game has improved dramatically since I got strong.That's because you need power to be a bowler... but not to be a baseball player. LOL!

CrazyK
04-11-2006, 04:14 PM
That's because you need power to be a bowler... but not to be a baseball player. LOL!lol

Patz
04-11-2006, 04:34 PM
I'm glad someone is getting my jokes..

Although that's true. I bowl much better now. Imagine trying to grip house balls with hands this small. Hand strength, and lack of fatique has made a big difference.

Meat_Head
04-11-2006, 05:40 PM
You guys forgot strength training for golf, ping pong, and basket weaving...

djreef
04-12-2006, 11:37 AM
meat -

you've got it right, and you've got it wrong. Having been a slowpitch tournament player off and on for the past 20 years, and having captained an 'A league' outfield for a number of years, I can tell you emphatically that steroids do make a difference where softball/baseball is concerned. I've personally witnessed guys go from average hitters to being able to hit the ball 350 feet, quite literally within the span of 2 seasons (each season is normally 8-9 weeks), after 'unaturally' bulking up. Where softball is concerned increased power and leverage is necessary to turn an 'out on the warning track' into a shot that goes into the woods. Gear with an adequate training regimen can give you that quickly. Where baseball is concerned, the same goes. The 350 foot pop fly that clears the fence (where the other team has no play on it) would normally be caught on the track. That's where the difference comes in. It's not about hitting the ball an extra 90 feet after the ball has already cleared the fence, it's about clearing the fence, period - even if it's just into the first row of seats. The number of borderline shots that now fall into the seats is where the difference lies. This doesn't even take into account hitting the ball so hard through the field that no-one can make a play on it. To add to it, the season is 162 games long. Gear helps alot of the older guys make it to the end of the season by increasing their ability to recover from game to game, much like they were able to when they were in their 20's. The younger guys get even better because their physical accumen is now even sharper due to enhanced recovery abilities.

Where you got it right was concerning the skill. If you don't have it, it makes absolutely no difference how much dope you're on, you're not going to be a major leaguer. The physical mechanics of the game are something that takes years to develope, even at the level I play at, which isn't even at the level I used to play at, much less at the major league level.

mrelwood- my recommendation to you would be to go with some sort of GPP training program to get you physically conditioned to do alot of fast stopping and starting. Sprints and shuttle runs, as well as jump drills would be ideal. Hitting is only half the game. If you suck in the field, but can knock the crap out of the ball you'll be stuck in an EH situation, and you'll never play the field. Getting to the ball is paramount to being a successful fielder. You're throwing accuracy is also important as is knowing the fundamentals of your position (whichever one it may be). In the weight room I can say without question that heavy deadlifts helped my hitting more that any other movement. In fact from the power side it is my opinion that deadlifts helped more than BP. But then again, BP is more for exercising mechanics and skill than actual power. A reaffirmation of sorts. Remember that hitting is about leverage and explosive timing. Bat speed kills.

DJ

CrazyK
04-12-2006, 12:59 PM
meat -

you've got it right, and you've got it wrong. Having been a slowpitch tournament player off and on for the past 20 years, and having captained an 'A league' outfield for a number of years, I can tell you emphatically that steroids do make a difference where softball/baseball is concerned. I've personally witnessed guys go from average hitters to being able to hit the ball 350 feet, quite literally within the span of 2 seasons (each season is normally 8-9 weeks), after 'unaturally' bulking up. Where softball is concerned increased power and leverage is necessary to turn an 'out on the warning track' into a shot that goes into the woods. Gear with an adequate training regimen can give you that quickly. Where baseball is concerned, the same goes. The 350 foot pop fly that clears the fence (where the other team has no play on it) would normally be caught on the track. That's where the difference comes in. It's not about hitting the ball an extra 90 feet after the ball has already cleared the fence, it's about clearing the fence, period - even if it's just into the first row of seats. The number of borderline shots that now fall into the seats is where the difference lies. This doesn't even take into account hitting the ball so hard through the field that no-one can make a play on it. To add to it, the season is 162 games long. Gear helps alot of the older guys make it to the end of the season by increasing their ability to recover from game to game, much like they were able to when they were in their 20's. The younger guys get even better because their physical accumen is now even sharper due to enhanced recovery abilities.

Where you got it right was concerning the skill. If you don't have it, it makes absolutely no difference how much dope you're on, you're not going to be a major leaguer. The physical mechanics of the game are something that takes years to develope, even at the level I play at, which isn't even at the level I used to play at, much less at the major league level.

mrelwood- my recommendation to you would be to go with some sort of GPP training program to get you physically conditioned to do alot of fast stopping and starting. Sprints and shuttle runs, as well as jump drills would be ideal. Hitting is only half the game. If you suck in the field, but can knock the crap out of the ball you'll be stuck in an EH situation, and you'll never play the field. Getting to the ball is paramount to being a successful fielder. You're throwing accuracy is also important as is knowing the fundamentals of your position (whichever one it may be). In the weight room I can say without question that heavy deadlifts helped my hitting more that any other movement. In fact from the power side it is my opinion that deadlifts helped more than BP. But then again, BP is more for exercising mechanics and skill than actual power. A reaffirmation of sorts. Remember that hitting is about leverage and explosive timing. Bat speed kills.

DJI fully agree with you DJ, but Meat Head will NEVER admit that he's wrong on anything. He is the ultimate e-guru of wbb forums.

Meat_Head
04-12-2006, 01:30 PM
Crazy,

I was wrong.

-Meat Head

Meat_Head
04-12-2006, 01:30 PM
But I am still the ultimate e-guru biatches

djreef
04-13-2006, 12:27 PM
That was never in question.

DJ

MJS
04-15-2006, 04:40 AM
A baseball swing all starts with the legs, you load with your back leg and step with your front leg. Then to your hips and core where you coil and uncoil for the lack of a better word. Followed by a follow through with your arms. Forearms arms are under looked alot, you need strong forearms because this is where your bat speed comes from and also is what you use to power through the ball on contact, followed by strong wrists so your hands don't roll over on contact, but they will roll over on your follow through. Baseball/Softball is alot of stop and go with very quick movements, at the first of the season it can take a while to get your body used to quick movements and throwing hard, etc.... I suggest some drills with sprints and quick takeoffs, and warm up your arm so your shoulder don't be hurting later after you throw.

Finally someone mentioned the importance of forearms; I was starting to get worried.

Patz
04-15-2006, 05:57 AM
This is a co-ed leauge, with 4 women per team so I don't expect it to be anything high-level. I just don't want to play, look like a douche if 25% of the women are decent-looking, or end up increibly sore.

Striking out in slow-pitch would be horrible, no?

Sensei
04-15-2006, 06:06 AM
Finally someone mentioned the importance of forearms; I was starting to get worried.
Umm, I said wrist work on post #14...

Patz
04-15-2006, 05:45 PM
I finally went to the batting cages and took some cuts today. It's the first time in a few years that I've even swung the bat. I was blown away at how much better I hit, how much harder, the speed of my swing, lack of fatigue in any form--all of it. It took one round for me to start making contact in the sweet spot and get accustomed to the slow speed of the pitches, and then WHAM..I was driving everything right back up the middle. I'm almost afraid I'm gonna hurt the pitcher when we take batting practice. I had a feeling I'd have better bat speed and all, but this was night and day. Once again, weight training is paying huge dividends in my life.

Also, a MILF of about 30-33 was blatantly checking me out. I had my 13 year-old sister with me and I guess she thought it was my daughter, which apparently raised my "attractive to MILF's" stock. She was decent-looking though. LOL..again, thanks to weight training! ;)

Patz
06-13-2006, 04:14 PM
I'll bump this for the fact that I think I have some sort of answer, based on experience...

I would say my core and hips have been the biggest asset so far. Forearm and overall grip strength have definitely helped, though. I actually hit a softball a legitimate 380 feet last Friday. It ended up busting an old lady's window...lol But, all the Good Mornings, weighted situps, SLDL, and grippers have probably been the best thing for building the strength involved in the swing. I can snap that damned bat like never before.

Goodwinm
06-13-2006, 04:30 PM
aside from the resistance and getting bigger aspect of it. Just practis hitting a ball. More practise, better you'll get (in theory) lol. hav u got one of those machine ball throwing things near you. Cuz i bet they are pretty handy.
If not grab someone else and get them to pitch against you.

Just nail the form. its just like a punch (i beleive) Most of the power drive comes from the hip swing and twist of your abs. So the best thing to work is those sxercises, (Cleans, Snatches etc) (as well as swinging with a bat to get better form)

djreef
06-14-2006, 10:30 AM
Another trick is to swing a bat that's a couple of ounces heavier during BP. Just be sure to not do that right before gametime, as it will throw your timing off.

DJ

CrazyK
06-14-2006, 06:12 PM
I posted in this earlier, but I'll agree with djreef to an extent. You really have to have your technique down to add in weighted bats or balls to your training. Or you're only going to make yourself better at doing the wrong thing.

djreef
06-15-2006, 09:55 AM
Exactly. As with everything we do here, form takes precedence.

DJ