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scrumcap
04-17-2006, 08:17 AM
Hey guys! Ok I need some help bad. I was a competitive rugby player 2 1/2 years ago until injuiries and getting drafted into the army put me out of the scene for ages. Haven't touched a weights set or an oval ball since then. In fact, its been so long, I even forgot my old username to these forums.

Ok as it stands, this is a plea for someone to help me find a training routine cuz I've been asked to come back to the national U21 team and I wanna start a proper regime so I don't come back like a washed-out joke. I need to start from the beginning, but I also need to reach an advanced level soon enough. Hopefully muscle memory is all its cut out to be.

I'm looking for a routine that's progressive, gradually reaching a high-intensity, power-orientated workout.

2004 Stats:
6'2" 260lbs 34% BF
Bench: 310lbs
Squat: 280lbs
Deadlift: 280lbs

Current Stats:

6'2" 230lbs 25% BF
Bench: 200lbs
Squat: 200lbs
Deadlift: 150lbs

Need to cut some weight, at least gain my old strength back and develop more powerful legs cuz my legs have become kinda scrawny considering all the long-distance runs in army. I'm not looking for bulk, but a leaner, meaner fighting machine. Please help me out here guys!

MixmasterNash
04-17-2006, 08:42 AM
Find a routine with lots of sprinting work. Handling and moving with heavy sandbags or dragging sleds would probably be good conditioning work for rugby.

Anthony
04-17-2006, 08:45 AM
:withstupi

I'd also do some plyometrics.

scrumcap
04-17-2006, 09:47 AM
I'm just kinda worried that at my weight and conditioning level, plyometrics could lead to injury. Is that justified? Any links to resources would be great

Anthony
04-17-2006, 09:53 AM
Well start at a level that is suitable for you. Jumping is a very basic form of plyometrics.

A quick search on google brings a ton of hits: http://www.google.ca/search?hl=en&q=rugby+plyometrics&meta=

scrumcap
04-18-2006, 04:28 AM
Alright thanks... As for the gym sessions, is WBB1 sufficient? I'm thinkin of doin WBB1 on Mon, Wed, Fri and intervals/plyos on Tues/Thurs/Sat. Eating wise, going under 500 AMR and supplements of protein and glutamine should be enough to accomplish everything right?

Anthony
04-18-2006, 05:47 AM
It's an okay place to start, but there are better training programs for athletes. Think about squats, deadlifts, cleans, rows, overhead presses, chinups, dips, etc. Big compound movements that have you on your feet. Everything else is just fluff. Also keep in mind that if you're creating a calorie deficit you need to pay close attention to your recovery ability. Weight training, HIIT, and plyometrics can be very taxing on your system.

Meat_Head
04-18-2006, 09:15 AM
What kind of rugby player bench presses more than they squat or deadlift? You have alot of work to do! Definately work on getting your legs and posterior chain much bigger and stronger ASAP. That should be your number one priority. Look at the highest level of rugby players, they all have massive legs. Aside from that, bent over rows, pullups, and standing overhead presses should be your main focus for upper body work, with bench presses thrown in now and then. Focus on form and range of motion, once you have both of those down start piling on the weight every workout.

scrumcap
04-18-2006, 09:51 AM
What kind of rugby player bench presses more than they squat or deadlift? You have alot of work to do! Definately work on getting your legs and posterior chain much bigger and stronger ASAP. That should be your number one priority. Look at the highest level of rugby players, they all have massive legs. Aside from that, bent over rows, pullups, and standing overhead presses should be your main focus for upper body work, with bench presses thrown in now and then. Focus on form and range of motion, once you have both of those down start piling on the weight every workout.

The kind that stopped playing after 2 ankle surgeries. Can ya recommend me a good split then?

Meat_Head
04-18-2006, 09:57 AM
I was referring to your 2004 stats, were those after your ankle surgeries? Any basic, frequent, heavy lifting routine with squats and deadlifts will work. 5x5, 3x3, 5x3, singles, etc.

scrumcap
04-18-2006, 10:15 AM
The first one was in the first year of my career. Separated my growth plate, so my legs never really got very strong. Speedwise I've got some decent speed for a big guy, but I just feel that the CG isnt right with my relatively weak legs. 2nd one was 2 years ago.

Anything more specific please? I dont wanna go into this half-assed.

Meat_Head
04-18-2006, 10:19 AM
A heavy squat or deadlift workout 5x5 is anything but half-assing it! Just make sure you bust your ass in the gym, you don't have to have a specific routine to get the job done.

scrumcap
04-18-2006, 10:32 AM
So if I should add squats and deadlifts 5x5s for every session? My coach once told me all we needed to do for a good gym session was 4x6 squats, deadlifts and bench 3 times a week, but I never actually listened to that.

Anthony
04-18-2006, 10:34 AM
My coach once told me all we needed to do for a good gym session was 4x6 squats, deadlifts and bench 3 times a week, but I never actually listened to that.

That works. I might replace bench with something more functional (overhead press or c&j), but you're on the right track. Look into single factor 5x5 ... might be something that interests you.

MixmasterNash
04-18-2006, 10:38 AM
A big bench is probably just as "functional" for rugby as an overhead press. However, there is no reason not to do both.

Anthony
04-18-2006, 10:45 AM
Ehnnn, I dunno if I agree. Pressing something away from your body while standing on your feet is a bit different than doing so while laying flat on your back. I'm not saying a big bench wouldn't help, but I think there are more benefits from the OHP.

Meat_Head
04-18-2006, 10:49 AM
I definately disagree, horizontal pressing is a rare activity in sports. Horizontal pressing with your back supported is non-existant in sports. Overhead or steep incline pressing happens alot in contact sports, think of a lineman pressing an opponent aside or backwards, pressing in a scrum, or even a stiffarm. All are performed with the upper body bent forward, not straight up and down. In addition, the standing overhead press does a ton for core stability and shoulder stability, and utilizes the entire delts far more than bench presses which generally hammer the pecs and anterior delts.

scrumcap
04-19-2006, 05:14 AM
Ok. This is what I've come up with then.

Monday:
Squats 5x5
Hamstring Curls 3x6
SLDLs 3x6
Deadlifts 5x5
Pulldowns 5x5

Wednesday:
DB Bench Press 2x6
Overhead Press 2x6
Dips 2x6
Pullups 3x10
Bent over Rows 3x6

Friday:
Squats 5x5
Hamstring Curls 3x6
SLDLs 3x6
Deadlifts 5x5
French Press 3x6

I'll start with simple plyos on Tuesday and Saturday like tuck jumps and bounding and work up from there. I'll add snatches and cleans in 8 weeks after I've built up a decent base first. Looks alright?

scrumcap
04-19-2006, 05:14 AM
Another thing... is there a difference between military press and overhead press?

scrumcap
04-20-2006, 07:20 AM
*bump*:hump:

Anthony
04-20-2006, 07:26 AM
It might be a bit much to do squats/sldl/deadlift on the same day, twice a week. Especially with all the other stuff in there. I still recommend a single factor 5x5 routine.

A strict military press is feet together, legs straight, press the weight over head. You don't have to be that strict, just get it over your head.

scrumcap
04-21-2006, 01:20 PM
what do ya mean by single factor?

Meat_Head
04-21-2006, 01:24 PM
Its full body 5x5, you pick one upper body pull exercise, one upper body push exercise, and one lower body exercise and do some heavy 5x5 lifting on them.

scrumcap
04-22-2006, 04:52 AM
Alright thanks for all the help guys! Time to kickass and chew bubblegum... and I'm all outta gum.