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View Full Version : Automatic football walkon at any college...



Meat_Head
04-18-2006, 09:48 AM
So there's this fat guy lifting in the gym a few days ago. He's not in shape at all, I'm sure he'd have trouble running a quarter mile, and he's not especially strong either. Anyway I was doing squats, and I noticed him come in and immediately load the decline bench barbell with 225lbs. I expected him to either hurt himself, look like an idiot, or both... he proceeds to do 21 reps, bringing the bar down to the top of his gut and bouncing it off the bottom of his ribcage/upper abs and of course loudly grunting after every rep. The range of motion was no more than 8 inches as far as I could tell. He then gets up and struts over to one of his buddies and says "I could be a walkon at any college in America. If you can bench press 225lbs for 20 reps like me, you could to!" I wanted to laugh as it is utterly ridiculous to think that the only physical requirements you need to be a walkon for college football is 225x20 bench press... and since he would fail miserably at a full ROM 225x20 bench press attempt. But anyway, has anyone else heard anything like this? Do colleges really value bench press strength that much?

ddegroff
04-18-2006, 10:12 AM
on scouting reports, you see ht, wt, forty times, and bp reps. The NFL scouts look at how good of a workout each player has pre-draft.

CrazyK
04-18-2006, 09:41 PM
In the end the anwser to your question is no. When walking on they look at your physical abilities, they'll time your 40m dash, 20m shuttle, bench max, bench reps of 225, and vertical leap. Maybe a few other tests depending on the University. The question they're asking through these tests are "Is this kid strong ENOUGH?, Is this kid fast ENOUGH?." That will get you on the roster for the fall and spring. After that it is all about if you can play. If you can play, they'll keep you on and you can work your way up the depth chart, if you can't then you'll be cut.

I play college ball right now and I'd say most of the walk on's either get cut, quit, or transfer.

Meat_Head
04-18-2006, 09:48 PM
Thanks a ton for the info... what would I need to know as far as playing? I know the basic positions and functions, I've watched alot of games, played alot of football video games, and practiced routes and throwing alot. Aside from that I have nothin!

MixmasterNash
04-18-2006, 09:57 PM
The hard part is getting hit, not lifting weights.

Meat_Head
04-18-2006, 10:02 PM
That's the part I'm most envious of... it would be awesome to be a middle linebacker. That's not really feasible at my height, but I think safety is or runningback or reciever. Do you have to take alot of hits trying out as a walkon, or do you mean as part of practicing a play or something?

CrazyK
04-18-2006, 10:14 PM
That's the part I'm most envious of... it would be awesome to be a middle linebacker. That's not really feasible at my height, but I think safety is or runningback or reciever. Do you have to take alot of hits trying out as a walkon, or do you mean as part of practicing a play or something?
He means practicing, but at the college level you'll perform 99% of your routes with out getting hit. It's when you do that it sucks.

On another note, what I just mentioned above will only happen in a game. If a safety or a backer lays out some reciever in practice, they'll be kicked out of practice for the day, be made to run extra conditioning, and be given 1 strike for the year. (3 strikes and you're off the team) So just worry about getting faster, and working on your skill sets.

Meat_Head
04-18-2006, 10:18 PM
Cool I can do that. Any advice on training as far as skill sets go? Any normal, heavy weight training is about all I can do to help prepare my body for hits right?

CrazyK
04-18-2006, 10:19 PM
Cool I can do that. Any advice on training as far as skill sets go?
Where do you live

EDIT: How old are you also?

Meat_Head
04-18-2006, 10:19 PM
Fort Worth, Texas

ddegroff
04-18-2006, 10:20 PM
That's the part I'm most envious of... it would be awesome to be a middle linebacker. That's not really feasible at my height, but I think safety is or runningback or reciever. Do you have to take alot of hits trying out as a walkon, or do you mean as part of practicing a play or something?

are you looking to walkon? if so i would say look into junior colleges, play there then move to a bigger U.

MixmasterNash
04-18-2006, 10:25 PM
Any normal, heavy weight training is about all I can do to help prepare my body for hits right?

Find a tackling dummy. Find a willing partner. Find a rugby club. Use a big old sandbag and tackle it. Roll around on the ground. Take up grappling.

Weight training alone is NOT good practice for playing a contact sport. It builds a good strength base.

Meat_Head
04-18-2006, 10:26 PM
I'd like to... it might amount to nothing, but its worth a try. I've heard trying smaller colleges than moving up is a good route, but I've been planning to transfer to UT sometime in the near future for a while so I dunno if that's possible.

Meat_Head
04-18-2006, 10:28 PM
Find a tackling dummy. Find a willing partner. Find a rugby club. Use a big old sandbag and tackle it. Roll around on the ground. Take up grappling.


I meant weight training as helping prevent injury as it strengthens muscles, tendons, and bones. I happen to have a big old sandbag... do you really think tackling it would be beneficial?

CrazyK
04-18-2006, 10:30 PM
Fort Worth, Texas
http://gofrogs.cstv.com/camps/tcu-camps.html
http://www.footballcamps.com/default.asp?page=20&camp=2&psub=15

^These are a few camps right in your back yard. Besides that you can call around, etc...

If you're past the highschool age, I'd suggest going to a JC first and getting some good skill sets before moving on to 4 year schools.

CrazyK
04-18-2006, 10:31 PM
I meant weight training as helping prevent injury as it strengthens muscles, tendons, and bones. I happen to have a big old sandbag... do you really think tackling it would be beneficial?
Not with out the eye of a coach. In my experience, it's not wise to do any SPP training with out the presence of a coach, it just doesn't provide enough benefits. On your own, stick to weight training and running.

Meat_Head
04-18-2006, 10:38 PM
Unfortunately none of those camps are for anyone over 18 and they're pretty expensive! What's the likelihood of transferring up from a junior college to play ball at a big school? How quickly could that be done realistically?

CrazyK
04-18-2006, 10:48 PM
Unfortunately none of those camps are for anyone over 18 and they're pretty expensive! What's the likelihood of transferring up from a junior college to play ball at a big school? How quickly could that be done realistically?2 years is all you can stay at a JC for most people, and then you weigh out your options. Honestly, if you played ball in highschool, and were a starter I'd say you're good to go to a JC and work at it. But if this is your first time playing, I'd suggest looking for a recreation league, or trying out a new sport.

Meat_Head
04-18-2006, 10:53 PM
Cool, I figured it was a long shot. Thanks for the advice anyway!

CrazyK
04-18-2006, 11:01 PM
Cool, I figured it was a long shot. Thanks for the advice anyway!
Yeah no problem, football, basketball and baseball are just the three sports that if you don't start early in highschool, you will probably not do very well in it. There are a few exceptions, but mostly the athletes just get too athletic at the college level, and they have superb skill sets to back themselves up.

Hazerboy
04-19-2006, 08:27 PM
That seems silly; I can understand a college's value of a fourty time and shuttle, but why so much emphasis on the bench press? Hell, you do the movement on your BACK! You play on your feet!

Sure its beneficial to the game, but what about squat and power cleans? ugh.

monotone
04-19-2006, 08:50 PM
Yeah no problem, football, basketball and baseball are just the three sports that if you don't start early in highschool, you will probably not do very well in it. There are a few exceptions, but mostly the athletes just get too athletic at the college level, and they have superb skill sets to back themselves up.


in terms of competing at the NCAA level, im willing to say every sport is similar in this aspect... and its probably even safe to change "highschool" with middle school

CrazyK
04-20-2006, 02:12 AM
in terms of competing at the NCAA level, im willing to say every sport is similar in this aspect... and its probably even safe to change "highschool" with middle schoolNope.

monotone
04-20-2006, 02:30 PM
how can you say nope... how many NCAA tennis players started at 18, or ice hockey, or lacrosse, or golf, or water polo, or soccer, or skiing, or gymnasts, or wrestlers. Id love to see you go out there and try and compete with any of those atheletes and just have them make you look ridiculous. Most people who excel at a sport enough to compete at the Div. 1 level have been playing 10 plus years.... are there exceptions??? im sure there are, but not many and of all the sports listed on your list and mine, football probally has more exceptions than the majority of the others.

235orbust
04-20-2006, 05:35 PM
while were on the subject of college football, has anyone seen Vernon Davis of Maryland, absolutely amazing body, 6'3' 252 at about 5% body fat, has a 41 inch vertical and ran a 4.38 40. Hes broken every single record at Maryland as far as strenth.

To the dude that was asking about how he could walk on, Just focus on Getting HUGE. yes it doesnt translate nessisarily to sucesss in football, but if have good size, have decent grades, and have a good attitude and 6ft+ a D1 or D2 SOMEWHERE will take you, im not saying you will walk on to USC but HS prospects are all about potential. If you have the body and attidude to play college ball, they realize that they can train you.

Bob
04-20-2006, 06:13 PM
For BP tests... declines are not allowed.. and no bouncing either... at least not at the NFL tests. They are almost strict...

Bam
04-22-2006, 02:46 PM
D1 schools are hard to get into and if your not breaking records in highschool/going far in state playoffs dont plan on going to a d1 school(it sucks but its the truth) my school has made playoffs once and that was 2 seasons ago and we've had 3 winning seasons and thats been the last 3 seasons in a row i know im not going to make a d1 school.

CrazyK
04-22-2006, 03:20 PM
D1 schools are hard to get into and if your not breaking records in highschool/going far in state playoffs dont plan on going to a d1 school(it sucks but its the truth) my school has made playoffs once and that was 2 seasons ago and we've had 3 winning seasons and thats been the last 3 seasons in a row i know im not going to make a d1 school.Not true. When I look at the recruiting boards, my school looks at every school in the state, and every school in its neighboring states. The reason why less kids go to D-1a schools from losing programs is because there is less talent in losing programs. If your team is bad, then you probably don't have some superhuman on your team that is going to get a scholarship. BUT, if you are good enough to play D-1a ball, they'll find you no matter how your team does.

235orbust
04-22-2006, 03:28 PM
^^also Ive known a lot of people that had a chance to play d1 but choose to get a better education and full ride at a d2 or d3. Unless you are thinking you have the ability to play professionally, I wouldnt focus too much on D1

Ozz
04-22-2006, 06:46 PM
To me, I want to play at a D1 school for the level of competition. I will have to go the junior college route to a D1 school but in my eyes it is more than worth it. I had a late start on lifting and will need the 2 years of training to be able to compete at D1. I put up good numbers as it is in high school but I don't yet have the physical ability to play in D1.


Crazyk...what school do you play at?

CrazyK
04-22-2006, 08:40 PM
Crazyk...what school do you play at?Confedential :hide:

Magik
04-22-2006, 09:24 PM
how can you say nope... how many NCAA tennis players started at 18, or ice hockey, or lacrosse, or golf, or water polo, or soccer, or skiing, or gymnasts, or wrestlers. Id love to see you go out there and try and compete with any of those atheletes and just have them make you look ridiculous. Most people who excel at a sport enough to compete at the Div. 1 level have been playing 10 plus years.... are there exceptions??? im sure there are, but not many and of all the sports listed on your list and mine, football probally has more exceptions than the majority of the others.
10 years is an exaggeration definately highschool but not middleschool.

monotone
04-22-2006, 09:42 PM
10 years is an exaggeration definately highschool but not middleschool.


id say it really varies on the sport. But i was basing it more on the typical D1 player. Alot of those guys (again depends on which sport) start at a very young age. In the case of some sports, such as ice hockey, if you wish to compete at a high level you are going to be competing against players that began skating at the age of 5 or 6, possibly earlier. But then other sports such as football... yeah highschool is probably a good rule of thumb as too when the typical players start, atleast in a real competitive sense.

235orbust
04-23-2006, 01:21 PM
it really does not matter how long youve played, you should have played 4 years just for the sheer fact of getting your name out there, but understand, what recruiters are looking for in prospects is potential. At my high school,we had a running back about 5'8'' 200 varsity starter for 3 years and has been all leauge 2 years straight. We also have a tight end that has played football for 2 years, is 6'7 230 and had about 6 catches this year and dropped just as many, but is a smart kid with a great attitude and extrememly athletic. The running back signed to a small d2 school while the tight end is headed to cincinatti. Yes the running back is a better player NOW, but in 4 years of college training and individual work who do you think will be better?

Bam
04-23-2006, 02:00 PM
well maybe its diffrent state to state i live in iowa(i know 1 kid who went to a d1 school) hes playing for Iowa state the only kid out of my town to make it to a d1 school. Only reason he got looked at cause of track and they told the football team about his speed and he was recruited.

monotone
04-23-2006, 02:22 PM
it really does not matter how long youve played

again i was using the time argument for sports other than football. Not every sport is recruited like football. Really, my argument i was making has nothing to do with the OP's question, just a statement CrazyK made in the thread. Football is really one of the only sports that CAN be recruited in such a manner. No offense to the sport, i played it a little in high school, but as long as you are athletic any dumb **** can be taught to catch a football... or run with a football, so they can base their recruiting on potential. For most other sports this is not the case, and the basics of the game are complicated compared to football. So any of my statements earlier can be disregarded in the case of football. Because i earlier also said football was the exception to my argument of time and experience being basically essential.

cphafner
04-23-2006, 03:09 PM
^^also Ive known a lot of people that had a chance to play d1 but choose to get a better education and full ride at a d2 or d3. Unless you are thinking you have the ability to play professionally, I wouldnt focus too much on D1

D3 can't give out athletic scholarships.

Bam
04-23-2006, 03:22 PM
Football you can play 2 years and get into a d1/d2/d3 school.

Wrestling you cant wrestle for 2 years and expect to go to college for it in less you sleep and eat wrestling.

Football is more natural abilitys(such as running,lifting)

wrestling is a lot about technique and movements and experience and knowing what moves to try at the right time(you know this from wrestling so much).

gator
04-23-2006, 03:36 PM
On another note, what I just mentioned above will only happen in a game. If a safety or a backer lays out some reciever in practice, they'll be kicked out of practice for the day, be made to run extra conditioning, and be given 1 strike for the year. (3 strikes and you're off the team)

I'm not sure what college you go to , but I know here at the University of Florida our Linebackers are allowed to go balls to the walls in practice. As long as they dont cheep shot someone coaches dont care too much from what I've seen. I've seen a receiver get sandwiched between a CB and SS. I've seen LB's lay some nice hits on our WR's. Hits where eveyone gets up and goes crazy, our coaches love it and congradulate them.

monotone
04-23-2006, 04:41 PM
Football you can play 2 years and get into a d1/d2/d3 school.

Wrestling you cant wrestle for 2 years and expect to go to college for it in less you sleep and eat wrestling.

Football is more natural abilitys(such as running,lifting)

wrestling is a lot about technique and movements and experience and knowing what moves to try at the right time(you know this from wrestling so much).

exactly

CrazyK
04-23-2006, 05:38 PM
I'm not sure what college you go to , but I know here at the University of Florida our Linebackers are allowed to go balls to the walls in practice. As long as they dont cheep shot someone coaches dont care too much from what I've seen. I've seen a receiver get sandwiched between a CB and SS. I've seen LB's lay some nice hits on our WR's. Hits where eveyone gets up and goes crazy, our coaches love it and congradulate them.Only can do that in maybe 3 times a year in our program. The spring scrimmage, the spring game, and the training camp final scrimmage lol. Otherwise its called "full speed thud", basically full speed but don't throw yourself in to a hit.

BigRic
04-23-2006, 08:10 PM
From personal experience the scout team which is usually first year red shirts and walks on can get there asses hit. personal experienece i got laid out on a number of occasions last year on the offensive scout team as a WR, now this year I will do it to the offense as I'm a SS. But come spring unless it's full go scrimmage it's mostly full speed thud like the poster above said.

d'Anconia
04-26-2006, 09:08 PM
Our team only has full-contact 1st team Defense vs. 1st team Offense a few times a year.

Honestly man, keep squating and start working on punting... that's what I'm gonna do.:strong:
Walk-ons at my school are in February so I've got quite a while to work on kicking technique.

My roommate walked-on and made the team (D1), without any scholarships or financial aid so basically doing it for fun, and I don't think he's anything special.

I'm gonna guesstimate his stats:
5'9"
185lbs
40 yard dash: 4.5
BP Max: 335lbs*
Squat: 405lbs*
Deadlift: 395lbs

So basically he isn't that impressive. He plays SS but then again he didn't get any scholarships...

DGabe24
04-27-2006, 04:01 PM
I would actually consider those stats to be pretty elite. A 4.5 forty is definitely insane, considering Vince Young only runs a 4.3 and no one could catch him in his championship bowl game vs USC. So I wouldnt put your friend down too much :p

Ozz
04-27-2006, 08:40 PM
Yeah, D1 40 time of 4.5 is definitely solid. There are safeties in the NFL that run 4.6 but have the ball skills and can hit. I think John Lynch (even in his prime) only ran around a 4.6/4.7....that shows you that speed isn't everything.

CrazyK
04-27-2006, 11:00 PM
Yeah, D1 40 time of 4.5 is definitely solid. There are safeties in the NFL that run 4.6 but have the ball skills and can hit. I think John Lynch (even in his prime) only ran around a 4.6/4.7....that shows you that speed isn't everything.Actually a 4.8. But hey, as long as you can PLAY, that is what matters. Kids need to stop obsessing over stats and just get good at their game.

235orbust
04-30-2006, 10:48 AM
there is a difference between speed and sport specific speed. The linebacker from osu aj hawk ran a 4.55 40 but Ill be damned if you see a faster lineback on a football field. very rarely are you going to get a chance to run a 40 yard straight line in football, unhindered.

and to the person that said d3 doesnt give out athletic scholarships, they are hidden as grants most of the time. i have an offer from a d2 and d3 school for basketball and it would acually be a lot cheaper for me to go to the d3 school because of all the grants i would get.

Magik
04-30-2006, 11:50 AM
Football you can play 2 years and get into a d1/d2/d3 school.

Wrestling you cant wrestle for 2 years and expect to go to college for it in less you sleep and eat wrestling.

Football is more natural abilitys(such as running,lifting)

wrestling is a lot about technique and movements and experience and knowing what moves to try at the right time(you know this from wrestling so much).
Not necessarily a friend of mine has been wrestling for about 5 years now and he decided to ask one of our other friends to join the team as a freshman he wrestled JV because he was learning and as a sophmore he surpassed his friend of, 6 years exp. by this time, and went on to CIF for his weightclass, so although I cannot say how good either of them are because i dont know anything about wrestling I know that his 1 year exp. was good enough to beat out 6 years exp.Another two buddies of mine are both CIF champs (one weighs 250 i hear thats huge for wrestling in highschool) and one has 7 years exp. the other started wrestling as a freshman but they ar both equal because the heavier one gave up football (Varsity) for wrestling and spent 90% of his off season time wrestling and going to wrestling camps across the nation and all that devotion, money, and time put into it helped to put him up to par with his friend of 7 years exp. so in short what i shouldve just said is that if u want something bad enough you can always make up for lost time.

d'Anconia
04-30-2006, 04:31 PM
I would actually consider those stats to be pretty elite. A 4.5 forty is definitely insane, considering Vince Young only runs a 4.3 and no one could catch him in his championship bowl game vs USC. So I wouldnt put your friend down too much :p

It should be noted that I go to USC and my roommate is on the USC football team. So I wasn't talking about walking on at like SDSU or something.

dahviet
04-30-2006, 07:38 PM
for a running back what shud his 40's be?

CrazyK
04-30-2006, 08:07 PM
for a running back what shud his 40's be?Whatever it takes for him to be a good football player.

Ozz
04-30-2006, 10:12 PM
As fast as he can possibly get. Takes more than speed to be a good RB.

Saggas
04-30-2006, 11:17 PM
haha, and I guess u need to know how to play as well???
i might be able to do alright in the running part and lifting. But being an aussie (I even lived in the california for a year) I don't know **** about the sport...!!

monotone
05-01-2006, 11:08 AM
the basics of the game are very easily taught Saggas

Meat_Head
05-01-2006, 04:09 PM
That's very dependent on the position you play. It takes ALOT of work and learning to become a good QB, Cornerback, Linebacker, etc.

CrazyK
05-01-2006, 04:29 PM
It takes the most work to become a good offensive lineman. It is the most unnatural position for a human being to be in. When you're young you will play catch, throw the ball around, run, jump, etc... How often do you get in a three point stance?

d'Anconia
05-02-2006, 01:50 AM
Yeah I'd actually say football is a pretty complex game. I remember back in high school when they were seeing if I could play on both sides of the ball... I just had no real concept of how our defense worked at all. It doesn't help that most high school coaches are just PE class teachers, etc.

CrazyK
05-02-2006, 12:42 PM
Yeah I'd actually say football is a pretty complex game. I remember back in high school when they were seeing if I could play on both sides of the ball... I just had no real concept of how our defense worked at all. It doesn't help that most high school coaches are just PE class teachers, etc.It's true that there is a lot of poor coaching in highschool football, but there is also a lot of great coaching. John Madden said that the best coaching in America happens on the highschool level, and from my experience with my highschool coach this was true.