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View Full Version : Sugary sweets as a good snack?



Nickthebassist
04-26-2006, 06:17 AM
I'm currently being told that sugary sweets (namely Nestle Fruit Pastilles) are a good snack, by a badminton player and sprinter. Is this true? I've always been taught sugary thing before exercise only, so the quick release energy is used, and not stored? They're saying otherwise. They say they know best because they've been talking to professional nutritionalists.

Mr_Muscle
04-26-2006, 06:57 AM
I have been with numerus nutritionalists about my sporting career as I am a body builder and i have been told that snacks such as fruit pastilles are a good snack in a considerable amount because the have nil fat and plentiful amount of carbs in all what you have been informed is correct. if you need anymore information then dont hesitate to get back in touch with me.

bumbells
04-26-2006, 07:08 AM
[QUOTE=Nickthebassist]Is this true? I've always been taught sugary thing before exercise only, so the quick release energy is used, and not stored? QUOTE]
Even if it is stored as glycogen and not fat so it will get converted back to glucose when you next exercise. The glucose is then used up by the muscles in respiration.

Nickthebassist
04-26-2006, 07:40 AM
I have been with numerus nutritionalists about my sporting career as I am a body builder and i have been told that snacks such as fruit pastilles are a good snack in a considerable amount because the have nil fat and plentiful amount of carbs in all what you have been informed is correct. if you need anymore information then dont hesitate to get back in touch with me.
Sounds familiar....get off the forum Nez.

BCC
04-26-2006, 07:58 AM
Sugary sweets are never a good snack.

Clifford Gillmore
04-26-2006, 08:47 AM
Agreed. Have a protein shake.

Unreal
04-26-2006, 08:50 AM
Sugary sweets are never a good snack.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

What the HYOOOOGE guy said. I think Chase knows a thing or two about how the game is played, so I would listen to him.

TheGimp
04-26-2006, 09:35 AM
Empty calories. Non-essential macronutrient. No micronutrients.

Nickthebassist
04-26-2006, 11:37 AM
Thanks guys, some lads from my school found the forum and found this amusing. They also think people on this forum don't know ****, because of coruse they've had this super duper professional nurtitionalist tell them ****. tuttut

Jordanbcool
04-27-2006, 09:12 AM
Junk food is GREAT pre-workout. It really is. I looked at all the energy drinks (red-bull, AMP, etc.) as well as most bodybuilding pre-workout shakes and they all have the same things in them. SUGAR. Yea you have caffeine, taurine etc. in them but sugar gives you great pumps. I usually down a a red bull before every workout and havent had a problem since.

Pro bodybuilders down tons of sugar before shows. Why? Gets the blood flowing making their veins show better. Any other time though sugar is a terrible thing to eat.

Actually i've also looked at it and theres not much difference between soda and most energy drinks. Makes you wonder about mountain dew and AMP.

-jordan

BTW. I also ALWAYS eat some good healthy complex carbs 3 hours before my workouts. The red bulls just give a good spike right when I need it. As built said "If your going to eat bad food atleast let it work for you".

Optimum08
04-27-2006, 08:19 PM
Junk food is GREAT pre-workout. It really is. I looked at all the energy drinks (red-bull, AMP, etc.) as well as most bodybuilding pre-workout shakes and they all have the same things in them. SUGAR. Yea you have caffeine, taurine etc. in them but sugar gives you great pumps. I usually down a a red bull before every workout and havent had a problem since.

Pro bodybuilders down tons of sugar before shows. Why? Gets the blood flowing making their veins show better. Any other time though sugar is a terrible thing to eat.

Actually i've also looked at it and theres not much difference between soda and most energy drinks. Makes you wonder about mountain dew and AMP.

-jordan

BTW. I also ALWAYS eat some good healthy complex carbs 3 hours before my workouts. The red bulls just give a good spike right when I need it. As built said "If your going to eat bad food atleast let it work for you".

uhh, can i get a citation from a credible source?

Optimum08
04-27-2006, 08:21 PM
also, all the sugars in energy drinks are usually fructose. if you want something to give you energy whip up a shake with some dextrose/maltodextrin in it for an energy boost. and caffeine is always nice as well.

Jordanbcool
04-27-2006, 08:23 PM
also, all the sugars in energy drinks are usually fructose, the worst of the sugars. if you want something to give you energy whip up a shake with some dextrose/maltodextrin in it for an energy boost. and caffeine is always nice as well.

No, AMP has maltodextrin in their energy drinks. Also im pretty sure the majority of energy drinks do NOT have fructose type sugars in them. I have a can of red bull in my hand and I drank an AMP earlier both of which had atleast one of the type of sugars you mentioned. As for the bodybuilders link i have a video of it if you want to watch it. Not a credible source but i mean its not exactly something you can do a study on.

-jordan

Optimum08
04-27-2006, 08:31 PM
if amp has maltodextrin, then it is not near the same as soda as you said in your post.

Optimum08
04-27-2006, 08:32 PM
all regular sodas are pumped full of high fructose corn syrup, so i don't see how you are making the claim that because they list the same amount of sugar they are the same thing? even u said that energy drinks don't have fructose in them so how can they even be compared to soda?

Jordanbcool
04-27-2006, 08:33 PM
if amp has maltodextrin, then it is not near the same as soda as you said in your post.

Yea so. I didnt say it was exactly like soda but they do have alot of similarities like the caffeine for one, carbonation and without even talking about the KINDS of sugar they both do have alot of it.

Sooo yeeea...

-jordan

Optimum08
04-27-2006, 08:36 PM
all sugars are not equal, so amounts of sugars don't really mean anything. and in reality there isn't enough caffeine in either sodas or energy drinks to do a significant amount to energy levels unless you are really sensitive to stimulants.

Jordanbcool
04-27-2006, 08:38 PM
all sugars are not equal, so amounts of sugars don't really mean anything. and in reality there isn't enough caffeine in either sodas or energy drinks to do a significant amount to energy levels unless you are really sensitive to stimulants.

Not really, it dosent take much caffeine to get you "pumped" atleast it dosent for me and i'd consider myself a pretty big guy. Usually I drink two red bulls though.

-jordan

Optimum08
04-27-2006, 08:47 PM
good for you. but back to the OP, sugary sweets like pastrys are not good for preworkout. if you want something for energy get some high GI carbs like dextrose or maltodextrin and take some down.

Jordanbcool
04-27-2006, 08:49 PM
good for you. but back to the OP, sugary sweets like pastrys are not good for preworkout. if you want something for energy get some high GI carbs like dextrose or maltodextrin and take some down.

I didnt mean any offense by it im just saying caffeines a pretty strong stimulant. But yea anyways we'll just get back on topic.

OP listen to opitmum.

I looove red bull.

-jordan

Optimum08
04-27-2006, 09:03 PM
haha, i didn't mean to sound like an asshat, im sorry if it seemed that way, i was just tryin to gauge where you got your info etc., i actually do enjoy red bull also, although i like the sugar free stuff a lot better.

brickt.
04-27-2006, 09:30 PM
Junk food is GREAT pre-workout.

No, it ain't.


Pro bodybuilders down tons of sugar before shows. Why? Gets the blood flowing making their veins show better. Any other time though sugar is a terrible thing to eat.

There's a teeny-weeny difference between a pro bb ****loading to get full and dry for a show, and a normal guy trying to hit a new pr that day on bench.


Actually i've also looked at it and theres not much difference between soda and most energy drinks. Makes you wonder about mountain dew and AMP.

This I agree on.

Clifford Gillmore
04-28-2006, 06:55 AM
Garbage loading is not an extremely common practice I might add.

Slim Schaedle
04-28-2006, 09:08 AM
[QUOTE=Nickthebassist]Is this true? I've always been taught sugary thing before exercise only, so the quick release energy is used, and not stored? QUOTE]
Even if it is stored as glycogen and not fat so it will get converted back to glucose when you next exercise. The glucose is then used up by the muscles in respiration.
For a first post, this is a good one.

A job well done.

Nickthebassist
04-28-2006, 09:50 AM
[QUOTE=bumbells]
For a first post, this is a good one.

A job well done.
Explain why people who eat excess sugar get fat then....

Slim Schaedle
04-28-2006, 10:06 AM
Explain why people who eat excess sugar get fat then....

Because their energy charge is greater than energy expenditure over a period of time.


Sugar gets this whole "you need to burn it right after you eat it" reputation. When people understand what really happens to macronutrient molecules after consumption, they start to realize the errors in certain common beliefs.

Slim Schaedle
04-28-2006, 10:18 AM
I've always been taught sugary thing before exercise only, so the quick release energy is used, and not stored? They're saying otherwise. They say they know best because they've been talking to professional nutritionalists.

In my opninion, it is slightly incorrect to think of sugar as a quick-releasing energy source. Identifying sugar as that tends to make people believe that it is magically used for energy (or converted to fat) immediately after consumption.

ATP is your energy source and is produced through various proceses in the body.

One way is the breakdown of glycogen to form glucose. That glucose enters glycolysis to prouduce lactate (in anaerobic conditions) or pyruvate in aerobic conditions. Pyruvate can enter the Krebs cycle to produce more ATP.

In regards to sugar (and I mean glucose...I am excluding frutose in this discussion), it is simply absorbed faster than a complex carohydrate and enters glycogenesis to form glycogen when the conditions are needed.

Consumption of sucrose (which is what people commonly think of when they hear "sugar") is a slightly different story becuase then you have to consider fructose. For information on that, search the forums becuase I have gone into detail about it previously.

Slim Schaedle
04-28-2006, 10:22 AM
Also, professional nutritionists sometimes know jack crap.

I know plenty of future ones in my classes and I would never go to them for help after they graduate.

Sometimes the game is all about self-study and exploration. Not following the cookie-cutter protocol of what we are "taught." Or...maybe I should say not taught, but should be.

Jordanbcool
04-28-2006, 11:07 AM
No, it ain't.



There's a teeny-weeny difference between a pro bb ****loading to get full and dry for a show, and a normal guy trying to hit a new pr that day on bench.



This I agree on.

Yea but brickt everything is in moderation. The point I was trying to make is that if your going to eat junk food its best to eat it pre-workout then any other time. If your going to eat bad food you should atleast make it work or atleast be used.

To your second statement. I dunno if you were being sarcastic but theres a HUGE difference. I dunno I was just saying though...

And yes. We seem to agree on the soda thing. Good discussions though.

-jordan

Jordanbcool
04-28-2006, 11:09 AM
In my opninion, it is slightly incorrect to think of sugar as a quick-releasing energy source. Identifying sugar as that tends to make people believe that it is magically used for energy (or converted to fat) immediately after consumption.

ATP is your energy source and is produced through various proceses in the body.

One way is the breakdown of glycogen to form glucose. That glucose enters glycolysis to prouduce lactate (in anaerobic conditions) or pyruvate in aerobic conditions. Pyruvate can enter the Krebs cycle to produce more ATP.

In regards to sugar (and I mean glucose...I am excluding frutose in this discussion), it is simply absorbed faster than a complex carohydrate and enters glycogenesis to form glycogen when the conditions are needed.

Consumption of sucrose (which is what people commonly think of when they hear "sugar") is a slightly different story becuase then you have to consider fructose. For information on that, search the forums becuase I have gone into detail about it previously.


This brings the whole high GI scale or low GI scale debate. But im starting to see now that alot of nutritionists dont know as much as they should. I mean who the heck is certifying these people?.... seriously.

-jordan

Slim Schaedle
04-28-2006, 11:13 AM
This brings the whole high GI scale or low GI scale debate. But im starting to see now that alot of nutritionists dont know as much as they should. I mean who the heck is certifying these people?.... seriously.

-jordan
The government.



There's the problem right there :angel:



However, bodybuilders have to take into consideration that academic programs aren't geared towards the above-average people that we know we are.

Jordanbcool
04-28-2006, 11:23 AM
The government.



There's the problem right there :angel:



However, bodybuilders have to take into consideration that academic programs aren't geared towards the above-average people that we know we are.

True. I think there are just certain myths that arent harmful to the average person so they usually go un-corrected. Such as eating the 6v3 meals and it affecting your metabolism.

We bodybuilders just like to know everything or close to it so we can make the decision on whats best for US and not what someone else says.

-jordan

Nickthebassist
04-28-2006, 12:13 PM
In my opninion, it is slightly incorrect to think of sugar as a quick-releasing energy source. Identifying sugar as that tends to make people believe that it is magically used for energy (or converted to fat) immediately after consumption.

ATP is your energy source and is produced through various proceses in the body.

One way is the breakdown of glycogen to form glucose. That glucose enters glycolysis to prouduce lactate (in anaerobic conditions) or pyruvate in aerobic conditions. Pyruvate can enter the Krebs cycle to produce more ATP.

In regards to sugar (and I mean glucose...I am excluding frutose in this discussion), it is simply absorbed faster than a complex carohydrate and enters glycogenesis to form glycogen when the conditions are needed.

Consumption of sucrose (which is what people commonly think of when they hear "sugar") is a slightly different story becuase then you have to consider fructose. For information on that, search the forums becuase I have gone into detail about it previously.
I'm tlakin white sugar here, the stuff you find sweets coated in. Not good sugars like those found in fruit. What type of sugars are the ones found in sugar on sweets?

Nickthebassist
04-28-2006, 12:16 PM
Because their energy charge is greater than energy expenditure over a period of time.


Sugar gets this whole "you need to burn it right after you eat it" reputation. When people understand what really happens to macronutrient molecules after consumption, they start to realize the errors in certain common beliefs.
So the basic rule is you have to use the energy you get in sugar or you will get fat?(I suppose that's true for every food, but sugar being so packed full of energy, you'll get fatter sooner, right?)

Slim Schaedle
04-28-2006, 12:28 PM
So the basic rule is you have to use the energy you get in sugar or you will get fat?(I suppose that's true for every food, but sugar being so packed full of energy, you'll get fatter sooner, right?)
The rule is utilizing any macronutrient to prevent fat formation.

Once glucose is converted to glycogen, it is no different than any other complex carbohydrate that has been converted to glycogen.

Technically all carbohydrate is sugar. Society just has a different underdstanding of what "sugar" is.

Slim Schaedle
04-28-2006, 12:32 PM
Also for those who don't know, "high energy charge" would refer to having adequate ATP.

So, low energy charge would mean __________.


A problem I am seeing is that people think of macronutrients as logs that are simply placed on a fire and burned. It's more like that log undergoing a bunch of other stuff, and then possibly being used to fuel that fire...also being dependant on a bunch of other issues.

But, it's not people's fault that they don't know the details.

TheGimp
04-28-2006, 01:04 PM
I'm tlakin white sugar here, the stuff you find sweets coated in. Not good sugars like those found in fruit. What type of sugars are the ones found in sugar on sweets?

The sugar in fruit, fructose, for our purposes, is not good sugar. Fructose preferentially refills liver glycogen (and then, if I'm not mistaken, spills over into fat stores?). Hepatic glycogen levels are an important factor in the body being in an anabolic state; post workout however, we want to be refilling muscle glycogen instead. Glucose (in the form of dextrose) and maltodextrin are the two sources commonly recommended.

Table sugar (the thing listed as "sugar" in ingredients lists) is a disacharride composed of 50% fructose and 50% sucrose, so it's not great due to its fructose content for the reasons given above. Similarly lactose, the sugar found in milk, is 50% glucose 50% galactose, and galactose acts like fructose to preferentially refill liver glycogen.

Slim Schaedle
04-28-2006, 03:54 PM
I'm tlakin white sugar here, the stuff you find sweets coated in. Not good sugars like those found in fruit. What type of sugars are the ones found in sugar on sweets?
Well, dextrose is white also. (Sorry, had to get that in.)

Sweets have different sugars. Some, such as smarties and pixy sticks have dextrose or maltodextrin. I have used them ocassionally when I have run out of dex.

I would hardly classify fructose as good. Frankly, it blows. There is a recent thread on here discussing fruit and you find find more ansers there. Fruit is good, for a variety of reasons. But, fruit and fructose are two different things.

Jordanbcool
04-28-2006, 03:58 PM
Well, dextrose is white also. (Sorry, had to get that in.)

Sweets have different sugars. Some, such as smarties and pixy sticks have dextrose or maltodextrin. I have used them ocassionally when I have run out of dex.

I would hardly classify fructose as good. Frankly, it blows. There is a recent thread on here discussing fruit and you find find more ansers there. Fruit is good, for a variety of reasons. But, fruit and fructose are two different things.

Im a right in saying that fructose is just plain old corn syrup?

Slim Schaedle
04-28-2006, 04:07 PM
Im a right in saying that fructose is just plain old corn syrup?
No

Nickthebassist
04-28-2006, 04:32 PM
OK, so are sugary sweets a good snack then? Cuz I'm totally confused.

Unreal
04-28-2006, 05:03 PM
Define good? Good for insulin spiking? Good for fatloss? Good because they taste good? Good because they fill a craving for sweets?

Depends on what your goals are.

Slim Schaedle
04-28-2006, 05:16 PM
OK, so are sugary sweets a good snack then? Cuz I'm totally confused.
Like I said earlier, it's going to depend on the ingredients and other factors.

Jordanbcool
04-29-2006, 10:29 AM
OK, so are sugary sweets a good snack then? Cuz I'm totally confused.

As a whole. No. But for pre-workout certain "sugary" sweets can be benificial for you. It all has to do with what type of sugar it has in it.

-jordan

JaredG
04-30-2006, 12:56 PM
So, how does milk play into all of this? (Oh, I know you guys love this question)

I am eating my second meal right now. It's a family pack of tuna and a half gallon of skim milk. After consuming this I will have taken in 96g of "sugar".

Jordanbcool
04-30-2006, 03:36 PM
So, how does milk play into all of this? (Oh, I know you guys love this question)

I am eating my second meal right now. It's a family pack of tuna and a half gallon of skim milk. After consuming this I will have taken in 96g of "sugar".

Milk and tuna are some of the best things you could ever eat for a bodybuilder. Your just eating alot of it at once. Dont worry about the sugar in that worry about the sugar in soda and cakes. Those are the processed stuff thats horrible for your body.

-jordan

gator
05-01-2006, 12:59 PM
From personal experience, food with a high sugar content tends to give me sugar crashes, something I dont like.

xelr8withus
05-11-2006, 11:19 AM
There is a new very highly endorsed EDS System (Eat, Drink, & Snack System) on the market. In fact 350+ of some of the biggest names in sports pay retail for these products. Steve Dingman, Pro Body Builder, Cadillac Williams NFL Running Back, Mike Shanahan 3 X Superbowl Champion Head Coach, Blake Sloan NHL , Marty Turco NHL, Randy Johnson MLB, and Curt Schilling MLB, are just a few of the 350+ athletes that endorse and pay retail for these products.

I have been taking the products for over 4 months now and have really fellt good on the products. One of the products I like best in the EDS system is a healthy energy drink with No Sugar and only a tiny bit of caffeine. The caffeine is the equivalent to a cup of decaf. It's also loaded with a ton of antioxidants (6000 ORAC Value). The energy drink is the equivalent to 15-20 servings of fruits and vegetables with lots of vitamins A, C, & E.

I'm not a body builder, but I do allot of running and have noticed that the energy drink keeps me going for the whole day after a hard run. The meal replacement shake and healthy snacks are also very good.

The products were exclusively made and marketed towards world class "A-List" athletes. Now they are available to the general public through independent distributors.

Jeff

Built
05-11-2006, 11:37 AM
There is a new very highly endorsed EDS System (Eat, Drink, & Snack System) on the market. In fact 350+ of some of the biggest names in sports pay retail for these products. Steve Dingman, Pro Body Builder, Cadillac Williams NFL Running Back, Mike Shanahan 3 X Superbowl Champion Head Coach, Blake Sloan NHL , Marty Turco NHL, Randy Johnson MLB, and Curt Schilling MLB, are just a few of the 350+ athletes that endorse and pay retail for these products.

I have been taking the products for over 4 months now and have really fellt good on the products. One of the products I like best in the EDS system is a healthy energy drink with No Sugar and only a tiny bit of caffeine. The caffeine is the equivalent to a cup of decaf. It's also loaded with a ton of antioxidants (6000 ORAC Value). The energy drink is the equivalent to 15-20 servings of fruits and vegetables with lots of vitamins A, C, & E.

I'm not a body builder, but I do allot of running and have noticed that the energy drink keeps me going for the whole day after a hard run. The meal replacement shake and healthy snacks are also very good.

The products were exclusively made and marketed towards world class "A-List" athletes. Now they are available to the general public through independent distributors.

Jeff

You were here flogging this crap a few days ago.

I looked it up:
"Snack" is full of fart-o-licious sugar alcohols
"Eat" has soy (a goitrogen) and fructose (!)
NOTHING is equivalent to actually eating fruit and vegetables. It just doesn't work that way.

I don't know what the deal is with you guys, but your products lick.

Jordanbcool
05-11-2006, 12:11 PM
Dont post here if your trying to shove products down peoples throats. Atlarge has us covered. And they do their job well.

-jordan