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View Full Version : Cooking eggs + preserving their wonderful protein?



IHaveToCrushYou
05-01-2006, 07:33 AM
Ive heard that scrambling eggs denatures a lot of the protein in them and I'm tired of slamming my eggs back raw (actually it doesnt really taste all that bad, but I just want to switch things up a bit). How do you eat your eggs?

getfit
05-01-2006, 07:49 AM
boil them

Clifford Gillmore
05-01-2006, 07:49 AM
Sunny side up, boiled, scrambled. I don't think that you can remove protein from food while cooking, as a general statement.

Eszekial
05-01-2006, 09:53 AM
salmonila poisoning is going to do a lot more damage to your endeavors than a little protein loss will.

TheGimp
05-01-2006, 11:51 AM
You're supposed to denature the avidin in eggs by cooking them. This makes the protein more bioavailable.

DoUgL@S
05-01-2006, 12:02 PM
Ive heard that scrambling eggs denatures a lot of the protein in them and I'm tired of slamming my eggs back raw (actually it doesnt really taste all that bad, but I just want to switch things up a bit). How do you eat your eggs?

Denaturing is not the same a degrading them. When you denature a protein it no longer has a 3-D structure but it is still in tact as "string" of amino acids. It is the denaturing of the the protein in the egg white that turns the whites of the eggs white. Boiling would also denature the protein. Either way the protein will be there regardless of how you cook it.

whiteman90909
05-02-2006, 02:04 PM
So did it turn out that my little gatoraide- egg whites cocktail is a good idea?
(pasturized, in-the-carton whites)

TheGimp
05-02-2006, 02:56 PM
The pasteurization process involves heating the eggs to approximately 120C, enough to denature the avidin, so yeah that works out fine.

getfit
05-02-2006, 03:00 PM
So did it turn out that my little gatoraide- egg whites cocktail is a good idea?
(pasturized, in-the-carton whites)
sorry, that really sounds gross

Slim Schaedle
05-02-2006, 07:09 PM
Denaturing is not the same a degrading them. When you denature a protein it no longer has a 3-D structure but it is still in tact as "string" of amino acids. It is the denaturing of the the protein in the egg white that turns the whites of the eggs white. Boiling would also denature the protein. Either way the protein will be there regardless of how you cook it.
This is correct, and a good answer.


Proteins have primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary strucures. To, the original poster, you are not going to be denaturing the primary structure (as douglasmolina metioned) by standard cooking or heating.