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crazyskater52
05-02-2006, 01:00 AM
Hi, by any chance does anyone know what type of meat this is just by looking at it? Idk, my mom bought it at grociery store lol, but buys alot and doesnt have label and guy takes off fat, next time I'll ask but until then i'd like to kno what type this is cuz we have quite a bit lol, thanks in advance!

wheels
05-02-2006, 01:30 AM
beef ? i mean the pictures are a little blurry and covered in gravy . it may also be some form of venison (game meat)

Saggas
05-02-2006, 02:00 AM
looks very much like venison to me.

Will.S
05-02-2006, 04:03 AM
Beef, IMHO

crazyskater52
05-02-2006, 07:19 AM
does anyone know wat type of beef it is? Because theres so many on nutritiondata lol idk

ClubberLang
05-02-2006, 07:40 AM
looks like beef: flank steak.

LifeSize
05-02-2006, 11:55 AM
beef flank steak..

eso es para hacer bistec frito, cuban style.. that steak is crap for anything other than frying and stuffing between cuban bread and some condiments...

crazyskater52
05-02-2006, 12:03 PM
YES! THATS EXACTLY RIGHT LIFESIZE! lol...sigh, so what type shoudl I buy?

LifeSize
05-02-2006, 12:22 PM
That beef is fine (I was being sarcastic), but its a little fatty and also very thin. My suggestion is to weigh it out and compensate for the fat content - IF YOU CARE ABOUT MINOR DETAILS. To me a steak is a steak and when my mom fries one up I never deny it. Pan con bistec anyone?

Try to buy other red meat, maybe cube steak, sirloin, top round, ground beef (lower fat), etc.. Less fat and thicker cuts of meat.. I tend to have red meat how ever it is someone else prepared it. I use chicken and tuna as my staples..

Are you in the 305?

Edit: just realized your ****s set to miami.. heh.. good **** dude.. i'm a resident as well.

ClubberLang
05-02-2006, 04:25 PM
flank steak is great when you cut it into strips and make it with stir fry.

crazyskater52
05-02-2006, 10:41 PM
They remove all the fat at the supermarket for us, so would this mean it has no fat right? or no? and also where in nutritiondata.com can I find this? thanks for the help

crazyskater52
05-02-2006, 11:00 PM
also if anyone knows what picadillo is? A cuban dish as well lol, how can I find out the facts about this? Or do I have to do each item seperate correct?

crazyskater52
05-03-2006, 07:38 AM
Are you in the 305?

Edit: just realized your ****s set to miami.. heh.. good **** dude.. i'm a resident as well.

Yeah I am lol, what part in miami r u? I'm in dade, go to miami dade collage kendall

crazyskater52
05-04-2006, 12:08 AM
Okay I believe its skirt steak...do you guys think it could be this? My dad said thats what it was, and he buys it but no one here mentioned it. And on nutritiondata.com it said inside and outside skirt steak, how do I know which one is which and whats the diff?

gunman
05-05-2006, 05:58 AM
looks like that new type of tube steak to me?

Ricochet_kid
05-05-2006, 06:40 AM
I think skirt steak and flank steak are pretty similar. I'm not sure from the picture if yours is flank steak though because the fibres don't seem distinct enough. Usually with flank steak you can see the grain of the meat very clearly.

Incidentally flank steak is excellent when cooked medium rare and cut accross the grain. :thumbup:

All this aside though. I don't think it really matters too much when looking up nutrition data on the internet. Those numbers are just an estimate anyway. It's like having an equation with three numbers where you round two of them to the nearest ten and then worry about the decimal point in the third number. You are not increasing or improving the precision of the result in a useful way.

The whole exercise of tracking calories cannot really be a precise one anyway, you have to use consistency, averages and guesses alot, and then hope that it balances off in the end.

The problem with worrying too much about precision is that it makes the calorie tracking process too laborious and time consuming and therefore makes people less likely to do it for a long enough time to produce useful data for themselves.

Sorry if I went off on a bit of a tangent there...

crazyskater52
05-05-2006, 08:39 AM
Yeah, its alot of work, but I believe once I understand how my body works and what my maintaining callories are and what foods have what callories and what I need to do itll be simple and quick. And I'm getting there lol just take me some time, tracking encourages me if I don't idk really what to shoot for and I'll end up eating w/e.

Does anyone know the difference of inside and outside skirt?

Ricochet_kid
05-05-2006, 11:16 AM
check out this picture:
http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/resource-room/meats/cutsofbeef/b&wcutsofbeef.jpg
Many diagrams don't even list the location of the 'skirt' cut. This one does though. It's right ahead of the flank on the underside of the cow.

I also found an interesting write up on this page:
http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/Season7/Steak2/Steak2.htm

"
In the days before World War II, plate-based cuts like the flank and skirt steak were called "butcher's cuts." That's because butchers had such a hard time selling them during the week that they usually took them home on Saturday night and enjoyed them on the cheap. But following World War II, a flank-based application called 'London broil' became all the rage in America, but only in America. In London, they never heard of it. I never have quite figured that out. Anyway, the price of flank steak has been going up ever since. But that's okay with me, because I have always preferred skirt steak.
Now if you have ever eaten at a Tex-Mex place, you've probably had fajitas, and therefore skirt steak. But, I'm betting that was outside skirt steak, and outside skirt's kind of a scrawny piece of meat, kind of tough and greasy, and it's really only good for, well, fajitas.

But inside skirt, that's a whole other animal. Take a look at this. What's unique is this grain structure. It's very, very pronounced, and it runs crosswise, rather than up and down, the way it does in, say, a strip steak. This grain provides us with some challenges, and with some real advantages.
"

There's also a bit of info here:
http://jennieoturkeystore.com/knowledge.asp?id=340&catitemid=22
You can see in the picture on this page that the front-most part of the cut is waay fattier than the rear-most part. Based on the description in the first quote above, we could probably determine which part was which.