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HelloEvo
05-12-2006, 08:15 AM
Hey, my cousin (kw1k on these forums) recommended me here, he said you guys are knowledgable and helpful, so I decided to give it a try :). Well let me start off by saying that I'm 100% ready to commit to a certain routine or whatever. I've pretty much changed my lifestyle to better suite the routine I'm on right now (Arnold level I training program) and I've been on it for 6 weeks. I'm reserving this summer to be dedicated to going to the gym. Now that that's out of the way, I was hoping to get some advice because I'm going to be changing my routine in 3 weeks. I know I need a lot of work, and they're really bad pics but just bare with me here :redface: I've gone over the WBB #2 workout and it seems good, but until my 8 weeks are up I just wanted to get some input on what I should add to my workout. Just incase you guys don't know exactly what the arnold what routine is, I went ahead and typed it out after the pics.

Supps I'm taking right now are Whey, Creatine Ethyl Ester, Fish Oil, and MultiVitamins.


http://uplode.us/up/picture_0001.jpg
http://uplode.us/up/picture_0001.jpg

http://uplode.us/up/picture_0002.jpg
http://uplode.us/up/picture_0002.jpg

http://uplode.us/up/picture_0004.jpg
http://uplode.us/up/picture_0004.jpg

http://uplode.us/up/picture_0006.jpg
http://uplode.us/up/picture_0006.jpg

http://uplode.us/up/picture_010.jpg
http://uplode.us/up/picture_010.jpg

http://uplode.us/up/picture_0011.jpg
http://uplode.us/up/picture_0011.jpg


Oh and just to clear a few things up about the back shots, I'm not flexing my arms, I just noticed, and also, those are my back freckles, not backne :redface:

Mondays and Thursdays
Chest
Bench Press
Incline Press
Pullovers
Back
Chinups (how many ever sets it takes to get to a total of 50)
Bent-Over Rows
Power Training
Deadlifts, 3 sets of 10, 6, 4 reps to failure
Abdominals
Crunches, 5 sets of 25 reps w/ 5lbs plate

Tuesdays and Fridays
Shoulders
Barbell Clean and Press
Dumbbell Lateral Raises
Power Training
Heavy Upright Rows, 3 sets of 10, 6, 4 reps to failure
Push Presses, 3 sets of 6, 4, 2 reps to failure
Upper Arms
Standing Barbell Curls
Seated Dumbbell Curls
Close-Grip Press
Standing Tricep Extensions
Forearms
Wrist Curls
Reverse Wrist Curls
Abdominals
Reverse Crunches, 5 sets of 25 reps

Wednesdays and Saturdays
Thighs
Squats
Lunges
Leg curls
Calves
Standing Calf Raises, 5 sets of 15 reps
Lower Back
Power Traning
Straight-leg Deadlifts, 3 sets of 10, 6, 4 reps to failure
Good Mornings, 3 sets of 10, 6, 4 reps to failure
Abdominals
Crunches, 5 sets of 25 reps w/ 5lbs plate

ElPietro
05-12-2006, 08:27 AM
Hey dood, welcome to the forums.

First off, it looks like you have a pretty decent frame to pack on some muscle, so look forward to seeing some pretty good progress.

As for the Arnold routine, I guess it's ok, although, if it were me, I'd probably ditch the pullovers and replace it maybe with DB flyes, or something else.

As long as you are training each bodypart hard, the routine is hardly the most important factor. Consistency really is the key, as long as you can stick to a routine, and keep progressing in weight, you should do well. Also, consistency in diet is probably the number one factor in it all. That's my achilles heel, but when I'm able to stick to a diet for even a few weeks I can notice a dramatic improvement.

My only other suggestion, would be NOT to do 25 reps with your crunches, and perhaps include some variety. I would do sets of 10, with maybe a 45lb plate, or cable crunches, so you can easily change the weight as needed. Then something for your obliques. You can do this with the same exercise by twisting at the top to either side, or you can do something else, like Dumbell Sidebends. You will feel those in the morning for sure. It's easy to do if you haven't seen them, simply hold a dumbell in one hand, and reach down your leg with it to full stretch, and then pull back up past neutral. Rinse and repeat.

Your supplements are the essentials, and that's great. Not really anything else you need.

ElPietro
05-12-2006, 08:30 AM
Oh, another couple things I forgot to suggest, is to vary your rep range once you are used to your routine. I think most of us probably started off doing sets of 10, and trying to go to failure. It's really hard to get much stronger doing this continuously. I found after little progress, that doing some sets in the 2-6 range, totally balls out, that it really allows you to increase the rate next time out with your 10 rep sets.

Also, in my opinion the forearm work isn't something I'd bother with regularly. If you train your lats heavy enough, then you will be getting a good forearm workout regardless. I don't do direct work, and yet my forearms will still often go into spasms all evening after a good lat workout.

Paul Stagg
05-12-2006, 08:32 AM
You've got a lot of potential, naturally muscular - you are going to look jacked after you gain a little muscle and drop a little fat.

I would immediatley change your routine to something far more basic and simple.

MWF do the following:

Squat 2x15
SLDL 3x10
Row 3x8-12
Bench press 3x8-12
Chin 3x asmanyasyoucando
OH press 3x8-12

After the workout, add in some other stuff you want to do - shrugs, abs, curls.. Just don't overdo it - spend 15 minutes or so on this stuff.

Add weight every single workout to the squats, and get the reps. No matter what. If you have to stand there for 10 minutes between reps 14 and 15, do it.

Do that for 4-6 months. Get your diet in order.

WildCard
05-12-2006, 09:30 AM
you have a lot of potential

Eszekial
05-12-2006, 09:43 AM
You've got a lot of potential, naturally muscular - you are going to look jacked after you gain a little muscle and drop a little fat.

I would immediatley change your routine to something far more basic and simple.

MWF do the following:

Squat 2x15
SLDL 3x10
Row 3x8-12
Bench press 3x8-12
Chin 3x asmanyasyoucando
OH press 3x8-12

After the workout, add in some other stuff you want to do - shrugs, abs, curls.. Just don't overdo it - spend 15 minutes or so on this stuff.

Add weight every single workout to the squats, and get the reps. No matter what. If you have to stand there for 10 minutes between reps 14 and 15, do it.

Do that for 4-6 months. Get your diet in order.


Paul,
I've read all of your online stuff and it's all great stuff. Can I ask what this workout is geared towards?

realisitcally, how much weight should you be adding per squat set? If i get to the point where I can only do 1 rep per squat, have i gone too far? This is clearly a bulking workout...

To sum it all up, Where can i read more about this?!

HelloEvo
05-12-2006, 09:54 AM
Wow guys, I didn't expect replies so quickly:thumbup:

El Pietro
Thanks for all that info. I always thought I should be doing something about my obliques. Like you, I think maintaining a consistent diet is pretty difficult, sometimes I think it's even harder than the workout itself. My step brother trains for MMA events and he told me he used to do broom twists (not sure if that's exactly what they're called) for his obliques, I think he said he did somewhere around the neighborhood of 1000 a day. Do you think that's a good idea, surely I'm not going to be doing 1000 any time soon, but you catch my drift. I'll make sure to vary my weight/reps every now and then from now on. I keep a notebook so sometimes I screw myself over by writing all the amount of weight I'm going to do before I actually do it, so I tell myself that I'll just bump it up next time I work on that particular muscle.

Paul Stagg
What you mentioned is great. There are a couple things I'm thinking of doing when I'm done with this routine actually. I'm thinking of either doing the 5x5, and the WBB #2. The one you mentioned to me sounds really good too, so now I'm thinking I should just pick one to do first, and do the next one when my 8 weeks is up again. Do you think this would work?

WildCard
Thanks.:thumbup:

Paul Stagg
05-12-2006, 10:00 AM
It's geared for a beginner, and it's geared toward getting bigger, as well as teaching you how to work hard and push through barriers.

You might add 20 pounds one workout, you might add 5 the next. Generally, people don't use as much weight as they really can.

Lets say the OP starts out at 2x15 @ 135. The next workout, he does 2x15 @ 145. He keeps going like this for 2 weeks (6 workouts). He ends up on the Monday of the third week using 2x15 @ 195. That isn't all that crazy, is it? Some workouts, if he feels really good, he might add 20 pounds instead of 10. If he's feeling not so good, or the prior workout was really brutal, he might only add 5 pounds. When he gets to the point that it gets really, really hard, he's going to learn how to push through it. If that means standing there with the bar on your back until you can do another rep, that's how it goes.

But it will teach him to work hard in the gym, get his high rep squat poundage up, and put some muscle on him. Keep in mind, adding weight to the squats is the main thing - the other stuff can stay the same from week to week if you like, although I would also try to bump it up.

The idea is from John McCallum's Keys to Progress. Everyone who lifts should read that book.

Paul Stagg
05-12-2006, 10:01 AM
Wow guys, I didn't expect replies so quickly:thumbup:


Paul Stagg
What you mentioned is great. There are a couple things I'm thinking of doing when I'm done with this routine actually. I'm thinking of either doing the 5x5, and the WBB #2. The one you mentioned to me sounds really good too, so now I'm thinking I should just pick one to do first, and do the next one when my 8 weeks is up again. Do you think this would work?



I would do what I suggested now. I would not limit it to 8 weeks, I would do it for several months.

Eszekial
05-12-2006, 10:09 AM
Paul!
I just hoped onto your "The Libertarian Lifter" blog spot and I had to forward the address to a few of the right wing wackos over here (without the wacko, and maybe not so right). Your spot on!

I don't want to sound like a suck up but thanks for all you do!

HelloEvo
05-12-2006, 01:59 PM
It's geared for a beginner, and it's geared toward getting bigger, as well as teaching you how to work hard and push through barriers.

You might add 20 pounds one workout, you might add 5 the next. Generally, people don't use as much weight as they really can.

Lets say the OP starts out at 2x15 @ 135. The next workout, he does 2x15 @ 145. He keeps going like this for 2 weeks (6 workouts). He ends up on the Monday of the third week using 2x15 @ 195. That isn't all that crazy, is it? Some workouts, if he feels really good, he might add 20 pounds instead of 10. If he's feeling not so good, or the prior workout was really brutal, he might only add 5 pounds. When he gets to the point that it gets really, really hard, he's going to learn how to push through it. If that means standing there with the bar on your back until you can do another rep, that's how it goes.

But it will teach him to work hard in the gym, get his high rep squat poundage up, and put some muscle on him. Keep in mind, adding weight to the squats is the main thing - the other stuff can stay the same from week to week if you like, although I would also try to bump it up.

The idea is from John McCallum's Keys to Progress. Everyone who lifts should read that book.


That sounds great. So I should add weight on every set while doing squats right? I just wanted to clear that up so I don't do anything wrong.

Paul Stagg
05-12-2006, 02:21 PM
Not every set. Every workout.

On Monday, you do 2 sets of 15 with 135.
Wednesday, you do 2 sets of 15 with 145
Friday, you do 2 sets of 15 with 155.

No matter what, get the reps.

HelloEvo
05-12-2006, 02:51 PM
Not every set. Every workout.

On Monday, you do 2 sets of 15 with 135.
Wednesday, you do 2 sets of 15 with 145
Friday, you do 2 sets of 15 with 155.

No matter what, get the reps.
Thanks a lot. I'm gonna start tonight :)

ElPietro
05-12-2006, 03:04 PM
I would say as you get comfortable with that, if you chose to do it, to mix in a strength focused day every now and then. Maybe once every 3 or 4 workouts.

You can do reverse pyramids, where you get sufficiently warmed up and then go for max triples or something like that.

So for example, on bench it might be something like this:

135x10
135x10
225x8
275x2-3
315 to failure
225x8

So basically you are building up to max at 315 with 2-4 reps. Of course, place in whatever weight values you are currently at, the poundage I used is just an example.

I feel that using a constant rep scheme over a long duration will make progress difficult. Of course, this doesn't apply if you are new to weight training, so as long as you are progressing stick with what is working.

HelloEvo
05-12-2006, 04:08 PM
I would say as you get comfortable with that, if you chose to do it, to mix in a strength focused day every now and then. Maybe once every 3 or 4 workouts.

You can do reverse pyramids, where you get sufficiently warmed up and then go for max triples or something like that.

So for example, on bench it might be something like this:

135x10
135x10
225x8
275x2-3
315 to failure
225x8

So basically you are building up to max at 315 with 2-4 reps. Of course, place in whatever weight values you are currently at, the poundage I used is just an example.

I feel that using a constant rep scheme over a long duration will make progress difficult. Of course, this doesn't apply if you are new to weight training, so as long as you are progressing stick with what is working.

Yeah I completely understand what you're saying. I've actually been lifting for like 2 years, but it was horrible. All I used were machines, with the occasional bench every now and then, I had no diet at all, and as soon as I would see a little progress I would stop for like 2 months. It was quite rediculous, so I don't really count that as weightlifting anymore :)

HelloEvo
05-20-2006, 06:20 AM
Update: Started the routine Paul Stagg mentioned on monday at squats being 135. On friday it was at 165, good enough progress?