PDA

View Full Version : Can someone explain fat?



arya202
05-14-2006, 03:58 PM
All I know is that fish and avacodos have good fat and Big Macs have bad fat. And what are the different kinds? Saturated etc etc..

getfit
05-14-2006, 04:00 PM
Saturated Fats Saturated fats raise total blood cholesterol as well as LDL cholesterol (the bad cholesterol). Saturated fats are mainly found in animal products such as meat, dairy, eggs and seafood. Some plant foods are also high in saturated fats such as coconut, palm oil and palm kernel oil.
Trans Fats Trans fats are invented as scientists began to "hydrogenate" liquid oils so that they can withstand better in food production process and provide a better shelf life. As a result of hydrogenation, trans fatty acids are formed. Trans fatty acids are found in many commercially packaged foods, commercially fried food such as French Fries from some fast food chains, other packaged snacks such as microwaved popcorn as well as in vegetable shortening and hard stick margarine.
The Good Fats
Monounsaturated Fats Monounsaturated fats lower total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol (the bad cholesterol) and increase the HDL cholesterol (the good cholesterol). Nut, canola and olive oils are high in monounsaturated fats.
Polyunsaturated Fats Polyunsaturated fats also lower total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol. Seafood like salmon and fish oil, as well as corn, soy, safflower and sunflower oils are high in polyunsaturated fats. Omega 3 fatty acids belong to this group.





avoid using cooking oils that are high in saturated fats and/or trans fats such as coconut oil, palm oil or vegetable shortening. Instead, use oils that are low in saturated fats and high in mono- and polyunsaturated fats such as canola oil, olive oil and flax seed oil.
minimize using commercially packaged foods which are high in trans fats. Always read labels to look for trans-fat free alternatives.
as saturated fats are found in animals products, use lower-fat version dairy such as 1% or skim milk instead of homo milk. Trim visible fats and skins from meat products.

Davidelmo
05-14-2006, 05:56 PM
Yup, and just to add to that,
Fats aren't a BAD thing.. and they DONT make you fat. They are calorie dense and so 100g of fats has 900kcal, whereas 100g of protein/carbs has only 400kcal.

THAT is why low-fat diets work.. they are reducing the total number of calories a person eats.. it has nothing to do with WHERE the calories come from.

Fats are involved in:
Vitamin storage
Cell membrane glycolipid, phospholipid etc formation
Energy storage and release (obviously... 9kcal per g)

Cholesterol is also used to make steroid hormones (such as testosterone)

So don't neglect fats... 0.5g of fat per 1lb of your body weight (i.e. 100g for a 200lb guy) is the reccommended.

D Breyer
05-14-2006, 06:04 PM
:withstupi david nailed it

arya202
05-14-2006, 07:19 PM
Saturated Fats Saturated fats raise total blood cholesterol as well as LDL cholesterol (the bad cholesterol). Saturated fats are mainly found in animal products such as meat, dairy, eggs and seafood. Some plant foods are also high in saturated fats such as coconut, palm oil and palm kernel oil.
Trans Fats Trans fats are invented as scientists began to "hydrogenate" liquid oils so that they can withstand better in food production process and provide a better shelf life. As a result of hydrogenation, trans fatty acids are formed. Trans fatty acids are found in many commercially packaged foods, commercially fried food such as French Fries from some fast food chains, other packaged snacks such as microwaved popcorn as well as in vegetable shortening and hard stick margarine.
The Good Fats
Monounsaturated Fats Monounsaturated fats lower total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol (the bad cholesterol) and increase the HDL cholesterol (the good cholesterol). Nut, canola and olive oils are high in monounsaturated fats.
Polyunsaturated Fats Polyunsaturated fats also lower total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol. Seafood like salmon and fish oil, as well as corn, soy, safflower and sunflower oils are high in polyunsaturated fats. Omega 3 fatty acids belong to this group.





avoid using cooking oils that are high in saturated fats and/or trans fats such as coconut oil, palm oil or vegetable shortening. Instead, use oils that are low in saturated fats and high in mono- and polyunsaturated fats such as canola oil, olive oil and flax seed oil.
minimize using commercially packaged foods which are high in trans fats. Always read labels to look for trans-fat free alternatives.
as saturated fats are found in animals products, use lower-fat version dairy such as 1% or skim milk instead of homo milk. Trim visible fats and skins from meat products.

Exactly what I was looking for! I FREAKIN LOVE THIS FORUM:strong:

Built
05-14-2006, 07:23 PM
Minor tweak on what davidelmo said (and thanks for that) - fats at .5g/lb lean mass (if you're very lean, bodyweight is fine, but some of us aren't <ahem> quite so lean ... )

;)

Mercuryblade
05-14-2006, 09:01 PM
So you are saying that I am not 384 pounds? Damn, I'm not eating a third of a quiche ever again.

Davidelmo
05-15-2006, 05:24 AM
Well it's more of an estimate.. you can take it higher if you like... I nearly always do, since fats are the easiest way to get calories on a bulk. As long as your protein needs are covered, take fats (and protein) to whatever suits your needs calorie-wise!

If you were 150lbs and bulk on 5000kcal a day (unlikely but still possible for some people) it would be VERY hard to get those calories with only 75g of fats (675kcal) and 150g of protein (600kcal) and make the other 3725kcal from carbs, lol!

See what I mean?

Clifford Gillmore
05-15-2006, 05:53 AM
So you are saying that I am not 384 pounds? Damn, I'm not eating a third of a quiche ever again.

You should be eating the whole damn thing.

JustLost
05-15-2006, 07:25 AM
but some of us aren't <ahem> quite so lean ... )

;)

Hey! You talkin' to me?

You talkin' to me? Huh?

/deniro

Built
05-15-2006, 06:25 PM
*Snort!*

SpecialK
05-15-2006, 07:18 PM
Minor tweak on what davidelmo said (and thanks for that) - fats at .5g/lb lean mass (if you're very lean, bodyweight is fine, but some of us aren't <ahem> quite so lean ... )

;)

Do you agree with getfit's post that saturated fats are unhealthy?

Built
05-15-2006, 07:40 PM
Natural saturated fats have a place in a healthy diet.

Canadian Crippler
05-15-2006, 07:58 PM
Milk :)

betastas
05-15-2006, 08:56 PM
I want to add that you should use coconut oil or butter in high temperature (300 F+) cooking of foods or products. These oils stay stable at these temperatures and little to none of the oil converts to trans saturated fats. When you grease a pan to cook your eggs or chicken, use butter or coconut oil.

I have also been reading a few articles espousing health benefits from coconut oil and it being tied to the longevity and lower cancer incidences in certain asian societies. This doesn't mean load up on coconut oil in your food, but consider it as a healthy alternative in sufficient quantities. I make my stir-frys with it (delicious!).

Keith
05-15-2006, 09:02 PM
Just a small note for you guys who dont know incase your interested...alcohol has 7 cals per 1g.

arya202
05-15-2006, 09:56 PM
I want to add that you should use coconut oil or butter in high temperature (300 F+) cooking of foods or products. These oils stay stable at these temperatures and little to none of the oil converts to trans saturated fats. When you grease a pan to cook your eggs or chicken, use butter or coconut oil.

I have also been reading a few articles espousing health benefits from coconut oil and it being tied to the longevity and lower cancer incidences in certain asian societies. This doesn't mean load up on coconut oil in your food, but consider it as a healthy alternative in sufficient quantities. I make my stir-frys with it (delicious!).

That's interesting especially since everyone always says "stay away from Taco Bell they use Coconut Oil"

Built
05-15-2006, 10:06 PM
Natural coconut oil is fine.

Hydrogenated coconut oil is NOT.

betastas
05-16-2006, 06:38 AM
Stay away from Taco Bell.

Coconut oil has a stigma because it is a saturated fat.
Coconut oil that is extracted without hydrogenation (IE, Cold pressed) is much better.

djreef
05-16-2006, 12:18 PM
I remember when folks (dumbasses) were eating cocnut oil by the tablespoon, under the misguided belief that the medium chain triglycerides facilitated fat burning in the human body. I got into it with one of the 'promoters' of this non-sense at a symposium put together by one of the disciples of A4M. Yea, consuming something that has 9 cals per gram, by the tablespoon, will make you lose weight. Needless to say that fad didn't last long.

DJ

whiteman90909
05-16-2006, 02:11 PM
Stay away from Taco Bell.

Coconut oil has a stigma because it is a saturated fat.
Coconut oil that is extracted without hydrogenation (IE, Cold pressed) is much better.
why are you singleing taco bell out? i love that stuff.

betastas
05-16-2006, 02:43 PM
Well, he asked about taco bell.

I personally just stay away from fast food as I prefer other foods.

ZeroBurn
05-16-2006, 04:42 PM
so just to confirm- a fat cal is just as good as a carb cal? i ask because when i'm on a bulk as i am now, i need 3,000 cals a day and sometimes to fill it up i'll take shots of olive oil. i focus my diet on first getting roughly 1.6g of protein per 1 lb. bodyweight, and then if at the end of the day i havne't hit 3,000 calories i'll take as much olive oil shots as necessary to hit that point.

lets say for the sake of argument, of 3,000 calories, 900 is protein, 1500 is fat, and only 600 is carbs. would this be "healthy"? from what i understand it's perfectly fine- you're in good shape for protein (225g for 135 lbs would be 1.67g/lb.) and fat, as well as calories. and since it's all monosatured it should be healthy right?

betastas
05-16-2006, 05:05 PM
I would be tired in the gym on so few cals. Make sure you get enough fibre during the day too.

But essentially, its the number more than the source once the basic needs are met.

Progress
05-16-2006, 05:57 PM
I hate modern science for learning how to hydrogenate fats. I think they should outlaw them. I'm also crazy.

Davidelmo
05-16-2006, 06:05 PM
A fat cal is just as "good" as a carb cal, yes.
Just remember 1g of fat = 9 calories and 1g of carbs = 4 calories.

Thats why it's easiest to increase fats on a bulk.. you dont have to eat as much to get the calories.

And yes, your sample diet looks absolutely fine; so long as you have enough protein and fats you can put the values anywhere you like. The olive oil shots are fine too.

No such thing as monosaturated. I guess this was just a typo, right?


so just to confirm- a fat cal is just as good as a carb cal? i ask because when i'm on a bulk as i am now, i need 3,000 cals a day and sometimes to fill it up i'll take shots of olive oil. i focus my diet on first getting roughly 1.6g of protein per 1 lb. bodyweight, and then if at the end of the day i havne't hit 3,000 calories i'll take as much olive oil shots as necessary to hit that point.

lets say for the sake of argument, of 3,000 calories, 900 is protein, 1500 is fat, and only 600 is carbs. would this be "healthy"? from what i understand it's perfectly fine- you're in good shape for protein (225g for 135 lbs would be 1.67g/lb.) and fat, as well as calories. and since it's all monosatured it should be healthy right?

ZeroBurn
05-16-2006, 06:28 PM
awesome, thanks.

oops, yea typo, monounsaturated, nice catch!

ZeroBurn
05-19-2006, 01:51 AM
so more on fats ..

we're discussing dietary fat, how does that correlate to fat in the body? for example too many carbs will translate to fat (stored in the body). but dietary fat doesn't necessary mean you'll get fat (as i understand it from this thread), especially if you're under maintenance. you could have 2000 calories of fat and 900 calories of protein, but if your maintenance is 4000 calories you won't get fat and actually lose weight?

does the quality or quantity of carbs matter? what if you say, down 1000 caories of sugary carbs at the end of the day to meet your goal instead of complex carbs like bread? or if you you're low on calories and pig out at the end of the day to make sure you still hit your daily goal, would a 2000 calorie meal at midnite be bad for you?

and lastly, i understand the majority of your fat should be mono or poly unsaturated, but what's a "healthy" level of saturated fats to have? i typically have 15-20g of saturated fat, but really slipped yesterday (had to eat out for meals) and got 30g. mono+poly fluctuate between 30-60g daily.

i'm trying to learn more about this through searches on my own but it's rather difficult to get specific information when you search for "fat", haha

Built
05-19-2006, 02:11 AM
Too many CALORIES will translate to fat. Sugar or sweet potatoes, eat too much and you'll gain.

I always eat my last meal at bedtime.

I seem to recall reading somewhere that about a third of your fat as saturated is about right. Maybe that's high?

djreef
05-19-2006, 09:37 AM
We also must address the issue that everyone metabolism is different. Some folks, like Built and myself, have to watch carb intake because it make us ravenous in a very short time. I also believe that we, from a metabolic standpoint, have a higher propensity to convert those excess carbs into fat. Folks like Slim, on the other hand, seem to be able to burn through extra carbs with no problem, more easily converting these extra calories into energy and heat.

DJ

Built
05-20-2006, 12:10 PM
It is SO WEIRD how freakishly hungry I get when my fats drop too low and my carbs go too high.

No WONDER following the Canada Food Guide made me so fat:

My current average cals:

179g of protein,
76g of fat, and
140g of carbohydrate,
1,966 calories in total.


On Canada Food Guide:
74g of protein,
66g of fat, and
270g of carbohydrate,
1,966 calories in total.

There is no freaking WAY I could feel satisfied on 75g of protein with 270g of carb. I was probably eating 3000 calories a day on Canada Food Guide "ratios" of 55% of cals from carb, 15% from protein and 30% from fat - and even then, my protein would have only been at about 113g!