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LifeSize
07-02-2006, 08:08 AM
Hello everyone..

I'm looking for a simple 3 day routine (M/W/F), the idea is to eat well and get strong. I will worry about how I look (or how big I am) later on when I have a solid base. I'd rather build my base power lifting than "body building".

Any routines you guys suggest? I work out alone, so the easier/simpler the better.

greathuskie
07-02-2006, 08:49 AM
what kind of strength?

if all you want is full body strength, get into olympic lifting or strongman training.

Natetaco
07-02-2006, 10:06 AM
I guess hes talking about powerlifting big 3 strength?

drew
07-02-2006, 10:16 AM
Start reading. A LOT. Go to elitefts.com and read the periodization bible articles then read the eight keys articles. Start there. Read something every day. Powerlifting is about obtaining knowledge, applying that knowledge, then figuring out what methods work FOR YOU and tossing the methids that do not work.

And if you're REALLY the lazy type, then just start with Joe Defranco's basic program (M/W/F): http://www.defrancostraining.com/articles/archive/articles_westside.htm

BTW, if you're the lazy type, then strength training is not for you. :D

greathuskie
07-02-2006, 10:33 AM
I guess hes talking about powerlifting big 3 strength?

im sure he is, however im still going to recommend olympic/strongman training

he said he wants to get strong, and there is no better way to get strong then to lift weight from the ground and throw it overhead :)

to me strength isnt how much you can bench press.

JustLost
07-02-2006, 12:24 PM
he said he wants to get strong, and there is no better way to get strong then to lift weight from the ground and throw it overhead :)


Amen.

Natetaco
07-02-2006, 12:48 PM
[QUOTE=greathuskie}to me strength isnt how much you can bench press.[/QUOTE]


exactly. I wish i could convince the 100's of people at the ymca and my school that..

LifeSize
07-02-2006, 12:49 PM
I had an injury many years to my left shoulder, I had to rotator cuff surgery. I never did therapy, currently I work as a system admin. I am a naturally strong person, but it's not enough for me. Currently I am dieting, I weigh 225lbs at 5'11 and I'd guess about 25-28%bf (I was at 300 before, then down from 250 recently).

Not sure what my exact goals are..

I want to be as strong as I can possibly be.

I want to have as much comfortable size as I can have. I guesstimate around 220lbs around 10%? (that could change, and when I was 310 people still thought I was in the mid/low 200s)

I get happy when my friends ask me to put my "****** strength" (as they call it) to use. I've walked an 18000W generator the length of 1.25 acres, drag out trees, pushing dodge dually's, etc.. I enjoy it when I do something in regards to strength/stamina that makes folks saw "awe".. So that is what lead me to stop looking into BB'ing, looking good wont make me happy if I feel like **** all the time and dragging ass just to put on that next little bit of LBM. So maybe I'll enjoy some power lifting competitions? :D

So for now I guess I want to keep it simple, make steady progress in both the size and strength depts and learn as much as possible...

I appreciate your interest in helping me.

Drew, thanks this gives me a place to start.

LifeSize
07-02-2006, 12:51 PM
I agree with this 1000%!


to me strength isnt how much you can bench press.

I don't want to just bench 300-400lbs, I want to be able to toss it.

Dinosaur
07-02-2006, 02:22 PM
Just focus on the big compound exercises: squats, deadlifts, military press, bent-over rows, bench press, dips, and pull-ups. If you get strong in all of those, you'll definitely be on your way.

Uncle Fester
07-02-2006, 09:02 PM
I've been dong the Bill Starr 5x5, it's been working good for me.

http://www.geocities.com/elitemadcow1/5x5_Program/Linear_5x5.htm

drew
07-02-2006, 09:34 PM
I don't want to just bench 300-400lbs, I want to be able to toss it.
I love that attitude!

If you ever feel like taking a road trip, head to Orlando and seek out Orlando Barbell home of Brian Schwab who is the #1 ranked 148 lb powerlifter. You'll find some STRONG guys there who know what it takes.

SkinnySadMan
07-03-2006, 08:42 PM
Wouldn't someone with a big bench also have big military press?

Dinosaur
07-03-2006, 09:44 PM
Wouldn't someone with a big bench also have big military press?

Nope. Most people have nowhere near as close. If they did, Gene Rychlak would be military pressing 700 pounds. In reality, I've seen guys who can put up almost 2.5 times their bodyweight with good form barely hand 3/4 their bodyweight in the military press.

How many guys do you know who can bench press their bodyweight? Probably a ton. Now how many do you know who can military press their bodyweight? Significantly lower.

JustLost
07-04-2006, 09:29 AM
Wouldn't someone with a big bench also have big military press?

They should, but they don't. ;)


Nope. Most people have nowhere near as close.

How many guys do you know who can bench press their bodyweight? Probably a ton. Now how many do you know who can military press their bodyweight? Significantly lower.

And yet a bodyweight overhead press used to be more or less a standard. (I'm not quite there yet, myself. Busily cheating by bringing the BW down.)

johnnytang24
07-04-2006, 09:36 AM
I would also recommend a linear 5x5. It's simple, you don't need to know your maxes, it's a good cross between strength and size development, and many people have had success on it.

Thanks.

Dinosaur
07-04-2006, 09:54 AM
And yet a bodyweight overhead press used to be more or less a standard. (I'm not quite there yet, myself. Busily cheating by bringing the BW down.)

Yep. If you could strict press your bodyweight, you were considered "moderately strong." You needed to press about 1.25x for people to be impressed. 200 pounds overhead used to be the standard. Now it's a very rare exception.

chris mason
07-04-2006, 12:01 PM
I have posted this routine here before:


Key:

The set and rep schemes will be displayed in the following manner:

4 x 8/8/6*/6*

The first number is the total count of sets to include warm-ups. The following numbers separated by a / are the individual set rep counts. So, in the above example you would perform 4 sets of 8 reps for the 1st set, 8 reps for the 2nd set, and 6 reps for the 3rd and 4th sets. Each rep count with an asterisk following it indicates this is a working set and not a warm-up. Again, in the above example the last 2 sets are working sets which are to be taken to within 1-3 reps of concentric failure.

Monday:

Stiff-legged deadlift 5 x 8/8/6/6/15*

Rest at least 10 minutes

Squats 5 x 10/8/6/8*/8* --- Take a 5 minute rest between working sets.

Calf raises 3 x 10/20*/20*

Wednesday:

Standing military press 6 x 8/8/6/6*/4*/4* --- Rest 5 minutes between working sets.

Weighted dips 3 x 10/10*/10*

Weighted chins (if possible to use added weight) 3 x 10/8*/8*

Friday:

Deadlifts 4 x 10/6/3/3*

Leg press 5 x 10/8/10*/10*/10* --- Rest 5 minutes or more between working sets.

Chris Rodgers
07-04-2006, 01:57 PM
I like something simple like Chris suggested.

I wish I could actually go back to when I first started and do something like that. 3-4 days a week, 2-3 basic exercises each day. The next time I try to move up a weight class I am actually going to do something like that, but include training in my suits/shirst as well.

chris mason
07-04-2006, 02:47 PM
I like something simple like Chris suggested.

I wish I could actually go back to when I first started and do something like that. 3-4 days a week, 2-3 basic exercises each day. The next time I try to move up a weight class I am actually going to do something like that, but include training in my suits/shirst as well.

Thank you.

Hey, I hit a PR in the gym today with a 575 lbs stiff legged deadlift. No belt, a hook grip, and very minimal chalk to keep the fitness facililty people happy. I had more in me but figured that was enough.

Stumprrp
07-04-2006, 03:04 PM
sick!

Chris Rodgers
07-04-2006, 04:27 PM
That is pretty damn ridiculous Chris. Nice job.