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View Full Version : Gram count on chicken, cook/thawed difference is about 200g



MagnaSephiroth
07-06-2006, 07:13 PM
My foster farm chicken breasts, it says they are individually packed (sealed) 2 breast fillets per pouch. There is water inside them, and in the freezer it was a frozen ice block of meat. Facts:
1 Fillet 198g
200 kcals
I weighed the whole pack (2 fillets apparantly) before, as a solid peice of ice in plastic, and it weighed about 400g. I weighed it after it was cooked in the grill, and it weighed 200g. So how many calories did I eat, 200 or 400?

Slim Schaedle
07-06-2006, 07:48 PM
Weigh it when it is thawed.

MagnaSephiroth
07-06-2006, 07:53 PM
Weigh it when it is thawed.

So the amount 200g of it cooked is completely inaccurate? About how many grams do you think I ate?

Built
07-06-2006, 07:55 PM
Weigh it cooked. Raw it can hold a ton of water - not so much when it's cooked.

MagnaSephiroth
07-06-2006, 07:57 PM
Weigh it cooked. Raw it can hold a ton of water - not so much when it's cooked.

So I only had 200 kcals then? Cause if thats true, I have to cook up another

Built
07-06-2006, 08:10 PM
200g cooked chicken breast according to the usda nutrient database (http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/):

Roasted:
Water 130.52g
Energy 330kcal

Protein 62.04g
Total lipid (fat) 7.14g

Stewed:
Water 136.54g
Energy 302kcal
Protein 57.96g
Total lipid (fat) 6.06g

Raw:
Water 149.52g
Energy 220kcal
Protein 46.18g
Total lipid (fat) 2.48g

Built
07-06-2006, 08:26 PM
If you're doing the math, raw chicken is about 75% water; cooked it's about 2/3 water: 100g raw chicken has about 25g solids, while 100g cooked chicken has about 33g solids. You'd need about 132g of raw chicken to give you the nutrition of 100g of cooked chicken.

100g of raw chicken is roughly equivalent to 75g cooked, if you don't add anything to it. So … if you weight it cooked at 3 ounces, count it as if it was 4 ounces raw (ie add a third of the cooked weight to get the raw weight).

Clear as mud?

MagnaSephiroth
07-06-2006, 08:35 PM
If you're doing the math, raw chicken is about 75% water; cooked it's about 2/3 water: 100g raw chicken has about 25g solids, while 100g cooked chicken has about 33g solids. You'd need about 132g of raw chicken to give you the nutrition of 100g of cooked chicken.

100g of raw chicken is roughly equivalent to 75g cooked, if you don't add anything to it. So if you weight it cooked at 3 ounces, count it as if it was 4 ounces raw (ie add a third of the cooked weight to get the raw weight).

Clear as mud?

This is very confusing but I think i have a handel on it. So the nutritional facts on the box are the chicken raw, so 200g a fillet is how much each one is raw. So would the nutritional facts be assuming that you eat it raw or that if you cook it, all the nutritional facts on the box of chicken become innacurate?

MagnaSephiroth
07-06-2006, 08:39 PM
If you're doing the math, raw chicken is about 75% water; cooked it's about 2/3 water: 100g raw chicken has about 25g solids, while 100g cooked chicken has about 33g solids. You'd need about 132g of raw chicken to give you the nutrition of 100g of cooked chicken.

100g of raw chicken is roughly equivalent to 75g cooked, if you don't add anything to it. So if you weight it cooked at 3 ounces, count it as if it was 4 ounces raw (ie add a third of the cooked weight to get the raw weight).

Clear as mud?

Ok i was thinking again, so I basically had 300g of chicken nutrients then? which means about 300 kcals and 75% of the protien listed...or am I way off here?

Slim Schaedle
07-06-2006, 08:52 PM
I have always assumed the posted nutrition facts were according to raw.

I could be wrong.

MagnaSephiroth
07-06-2006, 08:59 PM
Im confused as heck lol but i have to know

so if i cooked up 400g of raw chicken
which would be, if i ate it, 400kcals

it turned into 200g cooked chicken
Did I eat 200kcals?

RedSpikeyThing
07-06-2006, 09:03 PM
Ok, I'm going to confuse everyone a little bit more. The package said per 1 fillet, right? So that nutritional information applies to an entire raw fillet. Once it is cooked, the weight changes but the nutritional value doesn't. (Right? please tell me that's right!). So that means the lighter piece of cooked chicken contains the same nutrients as the heavier raw one. That means the box is correct.

I hope I didn't **** everyone up too much lol

MagnaSephiroth
07-06-2006, 09:06 PM
Ok, I'm going to confuse everyone a little bit more. The package said per 1 fillet, right? So that nutritional information applies to an entire raw fillet. Once it is cooked, the weight changes but the nutritional value doesn't. (Right? please tell me that's right!). So that means the lighter piece of cooked chicken contains the same nutrients as the heavier raw one. That means the box is correct.

I hope I didn't **** everyone up too much lol

If thats right, then I dont have to eat more and im fine...

RedSpikeyThing
07-06-2006, 09:08 PM
From your sig it looks like you're bulking. Eat the damn chicken and forget about it. EDIT: For now that is. You might want to figure it out sooner or later.

MagnaSephiroth
07-06-2006, 09:09 PM
From your sig it looks like you're bulking. Eat the damn chicken and forget about it. EDIT: For now that is. You might want to figure it out sooner or later.

I did eat it, i just need to know if I should eat another lol

RedSpikeyThing
07-06-2006, 09:11 PM
I did eat it, i just need to know if I should eat another lol

Bulking = yes to seconds lol

SpecialK
07-06-2006, 09:12 PM
If you're doing the math, raw chicken is about 75% water; cooked it's about 2/3 water: 100g raw chicken has about 25g solids, while 100g cooked chicken has about 33g solids. You'd need about 132g of raw chicken to give you the nutrition of 100g of cooked chicken.

100g of raw chicken is roughly equivalent to 75g cooked, if you don't add anything to it. So if you weight it cooked at 3 ounces, count it as if it was 4 ounces raw (ie add a third of the cooked weight to get the raw weight).

Clear as mud?

I weigh it cooked, multiply that by 4/3, and use that weight along with the nutition info on the package when entering chicken breast into fitday.

Are we saying the same thing here?

Built
07-06-2006, 09:13 PM
Yep.

:)

You're SMRT.

;)

MagnaSephiroth
07-06-2006, 09:18 PM
I weigh it cooked, multiply that by 4/3, and use that weight along with the nutition info on the package when entering chicken breast into fitday.

Are we saying the same thing here?

200 x 4/3 is 266... <pulls hair out>

Davidelmo
07-07-2006, 05:18 AM
Buy a set of scales.

Weight it when you've cooked it.

Clifford Gillmore
07-07-2006, 05:40 AM
Quick education; Why generic chicken is watery

Standard bred chicken; The cleaning process for plucked whole chickens involes a water tumbler, in this process they are submerged for a prolonged time to clean all pores, wounds etc. A vast quantity is flushed upon the chickens, and once living tissue likes to soak up a bit of water, so...

Getting a less watery chicken cut, ie breast, is a process of finding a source of free-range chickens which use a different cleaning process. Its more expensive, but the water you loose in the cooking process means more meat for the buck.


Chickens ain't chickens, wait until you find out about GH and growth promoting anti-biotics :)

Davidelmo
07-07-2006, 05:50 AM
^^ They also often just inject water to increase the weight too. I always buy organic, free range

Con
07-07-2006, 06:45 AM
just wondering if it matters how you cooked the chicken? only reason i ask is becuase im lazy and just boil my chicken, and it is surrounded by water so will that further deviate the results?

just wondering, thanks