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View Full Version : "0g Trans Fat" product labelling.



manowar669
07-17-2006, 06:53 PM
Just about every product I see now has "0g trans fat" on the front label. These products include Doritos, potato chips, cookies, etc. I don't eat these things, so I'm just more curious than anything. The ingredients on these products include partially hydrogenated soybean oil, and other bad things. I thought these partially hydrogenated oils, when fried made varying amounts of trans fats. Am I misinformed?

Built
07-17-2006, 06:54 PM
They rig the serving size so there's less than a gram of trans fat per "serving".

Margin Of Error
07-17-2006, 06:56 PM
I'm pretty sure that if a product has say .5 grams of trans fat per serving (less than 1 gram) or less they can legally get away with saying it has 0 GRAMS. Products that have literally no trans fats will usually say something like "Free of Trans Fats"

ScroogeSF
07-17-2006, 07:01 PM
This is just cheating...even regular peanut butter says "0" trans fat

Built
07-17-2006, 07:02 PM
And ... it's legal.

Nicoman
07-17-2006, 08:18 PM
And ... it's legal.


That is scary.

ddegroff
07-17-2006, 09:28 PM
It's actually all nutrients thats .5g or less can be marked as 0g. IT's a real bummer that they made all this progress with lableing and they are still able to "hide" the Trans fat.

manowar669
07-18-2006, 03:20 AM
They rig the serving size so there's less than a gram of trans fat per "serving".

Yeah, I figured. They started that crap in the 80's when fat was the devil. Now if you'll pardon me, I'm going to eat my "0g Trans fat" Twinkies now, 1 twinkie is 945 servings. Now, "plutonium and cyanide free" (<1g/serving each).

MagnaSephiroth
07-18-2006, 04:15 PM
Thats just wrong. Food should be required to the nearest tenth. So they could only say 0g of transfat if there is less then .1

Joe_Halt
07-19-2006, 09:21 AM
The best way to tell is look and see if it has partially hydrogenated oil which is trans fat.

Holto
07-19-2006, 11:26 AM
The best way to tell is look and see if it has partially hydrogenated oil which is trans fat.

Yep. They can't hide it from the informed.

MagnaSephiroth
07-19-2006, 01:25 PM
Yep. They can't hide it from the informed.
How many casuals are informed like that though? We should make stickers so we can "stick" it to the companies ;)

emunah
07-19-2006, 02:19 PM
You can have partially hydrogenated oil and not be trans fat.

ShockBoxer
07-19-2006, 02:47 PM
A lot of companies have moved to non-hydrogenated oils to avoid this trans-fat fallout. It's a little pricier but let's face it: They'd make a killing even if cost of production doubled.

Progress
07-19-2006, 02:57 PM
My rule used to be not to eat anything that had "hydrogenated ... oils" in it. Now I can't even trust that. :(

Progress
07-19-2006, 02:57 PM
You can have partially hydrogenated oil and not be trans fat.
Really?

Turnip
07-20-2006, 10:39 PM
I heard they were trying to create a new type of plastic or rubber or something when they made trans fat and it looked like lard so they decided to try it in food, any idea if this is true?

Mercuryblade
07-20-2006, 11:40 PM
Edit, this was posted twice, deleted it to save room.

Mercuryblade
07-20-2006, 11:40 PM
You can have partially hydrogenated oil and not be trans fat.

No. You can't. When you hydrogenate an oil, you reorganize the chemical structure of a fat, and transfer it from a cis to trans configuration.
Hasn't this been beat to death already?


I heard they were trying to create a new type of plastic or rubber or something when they made trans fat and it looked like lard so they decided to try it in food, any idea if this is true?

Not at all (although much more entertaining story than the real one however) some french chemist was doing experiments with fixing in hydrogen into organic structures, then a german scientist realized the process could be used to turn unsaturated fats from an oil phase into a saturated solid one.

Learned about this stuff in one of my biochem classes last year.

Progress
07-21-2006, 05:23 AM
Not at all (although much more entertaining story than the real one however) some french chemist was doing experiments with fixing in hydrogen into organic structures, then a german scientist realized the process could be used to turn unsaturated fats from an oil phase into a saturated solid one.

Learned about this stuff in one of my biochem classes last year.

Isn't hydrogenated oil often used as a preservative?

Mercuryblade
07-21-2006, 03:20 PM
Isn't hydrogenated oil often used as a preservative?
It works as a preservative because trans fats can't be broken down by organic means (ie bacteria, our stomachs) Ever seen Supersize Me? The fry's never rot.

Turnip
07-21-2006, 04:32 PM
So instead it just clogs up our arteries, of course the companies selling the crap know more about it than we do... :swear:

ArchAngel777
07-21-2006, 04:45 PM
Yes, there is/was talk that the FDA is going to require the nutritional information for an entire package. Meaning, it would display not only serving size, but also the entire contents. That way, companies could not easily hide calories.

The same thing is done with Splenda. Splenda actually has 96 calories a cup, but they shrink the serving size down to less than a gram so they can claim calorie free. Still, 96 calories is rather negligable, but nevertheless, if is not accurate to state calorie free.