PDA

View Full Version : Squats: Change routine or form?



Hazerboy
07-20-2006, 04:44 PM
I've hit a bit a plateau in squats (at least for me), I've been at the same weight for around a month now. I'm thinking of doing one of two things. Originally I planned to just change up my rep scheme. However, I've also considered just staying where I am and changing my form, i.e. low bar squats instead of high bar. I noticed last time while warming up that low bar squats seemed a lot easier. I'm sure I could handle a lot more weight after a session or two getting used to the form.

My goal is just to gain more strength for grappling, I'm not interested in competing in powerlifting. That being said, should I stick to my usual form and change my rep scheme or start doing low bar squats?

laxguy1028
07-20-2006, 04:46 PM
Do what feels right, if the low bar squats feel good and you feel that your form if good then switch to them. If your form isn't as good as your regular squats switch the rep scheme.

CDONDICI
07-20-2006, 10:57 PM
How low do you go?

Hazerboy
07-21-2006, 10:15 AM
Parallel or a bit below.

drew
07-21-2006, 03:45 PM
Try the low bar squats for a while and see what happens. The change in leverage could be just enough to kick start your CNS. If you're not seeing results within 6 weeks, change the rep scheme.

CDONDICI
07-23-2006, 12:30 AM
Parallel or a bit below.

You should try going A2G, especially if your goal is strength for grappling. You will have to lower the weigth, but I think you'll get more benefit from A2G.

Hazerboy
07-23-2006, 04:38 PM
I've been told this before, but I've never understood why. While grappling I don't really use that range of motion.

bjohnso
07-24-2006, 01:20 PM
I think the strength and size gains are probably superior with A2G

Hazerboy
07-25-2006, 01:33 AM
I'm happy with my weight class, so i'm not trying to put on any more size. As far as strength, it just seems unnecessary to go A2G for wrestling. I'll be doing short explosions from either a crouching position or in my stance, neither of which really uses the muscles at the rock bottom of a squat.

Also, I can see why you would probably get more size out of rock bottom squats - you're using more stabilizers and thus producing more testosterone (however you'll be using signifigantly less weight, perhaps this counteracts any benefits?) Though I don't see how rock bottom squats would translate to REAL WORLD strenght at all. Rarely do you go below parallel in anything. Though perhaps I am uninformed on the subject, anyone care to elaborate?

drew
07-25-2006, 03:30 PM
For sports, I don't think it's necessary to go below parallel. If you're in a balled up position in wrestling, you're probably all done anyway. :D

Parallel or below is all you need for maximum strength development.

Hazerboy
07-26-2006, 12:09 AM
Hm How long does it take to learn the form for Low bar squats? I tried it today and my working sets where like 30-40 lbs less than usual, and I found it much harder to hit parellel. Aspects of the lift seem much easier but getting low is pretty hard, as well as holding on to the bar - it would take me a long time to be able to max with this style!

dw06wu
07-26-2006, 12:26 AM
Hm How long does it take to learn the form for Low bar squats? I tried it today and my working sets where like 30-40 lbs less than usual, and I found it much harder to hit parellel. Aspects of the lift seem much easier but getting low is pretty hard, as well as holding on to the bar - it would take me a long time to be able to max with this style!
Lowering the bar forces you to lean forward with the weight more. When combined with widening the stance, it reduces your possible ROM. Ive noticed personally that my knees must drift forward to balance the weight and not fall over backwards with the wide stance, but the knees don't drift to a point where the form would be considered bad. Go as low as you can, and if you still can't hit parallel, you might want to try some hip stretches. I think also you can try putting some elevation under your heels to help, but if your goal is competing then that solution doesn't help.

Funky_monkey
07-26-2006, 12:04 PM
if you go a2g you fully stretch the muscle and work it over a longer distance. i would start lighter - like 50lbs lighter. then add 15lbs each week and go below parallel. do 5 singles resting around 1min in the beginning, then as little as necessary later on. then do 5x5 narrow grip paused squats. ed coans squat routine but just modified a bit as we (i know i do certainly) use less weight. i'm squatting around 390 max with wraps.

drew
07-26-2006, 06:14 PM
Hm How long does it take to learn the form for Low bar squats? I tried it today and my working sets where like 30-40 lbs less than usual, and I found it much harder to hit parellel. Aspects of the lift seem much easier but getting low is pretty hard, as well as holding on to the bar - it would take me a long time to be able to max with this style!
It should only take a few weeks. Just work on getting your shoulders really tight and squeeze them together. Once you're under the bar, before you unrack, squeeze your shoulder blades even tighter (after a while, this becomes second nature). Make sure to grip and squeeze the bar and try to keep your elbows forward. THis should help you keep the right position and hold onto the bar. You may have to lean forward slightly, but make sure to keep your chest high.

Hazerboy
07-28-2006, 12:24 AM
Do you think it would be beneficial for sports purposes, even though I"m not competing?