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drew
07-29-2006, 03:47 PM
So, last weekend I was talking to a girl that I recently met and we were just lying there and she started to ask me about lifting. How I got into it, why don't I do something easier, what kind of injuries I've had, etc. After answering all these and finishing up with telling her that my shoulders are always hurt, my hips are usually tight, I have trouble sleeping through the night, etc. She asked me a very simple question. "What's the draw?"

My answer took no time at all to think of. I do this because it makes everything else easy. Powerlifting is the only place where you constantly push your body to its absolute limit. You either do or don't. You always know what your body is absolutely capable of. When you give it everything and it takes forever to get that last half inch, you know what it takes to get it done. After that, nothing is hard. It's also the only sport I can think of that doesn't get easier as you get better at it, it gets HARDER.

Anyway, the reason I keep going back to is simple. I do this because it makes everything in life easy.

So what's the draw? Why is it all worth it to you?

bjohnso
07-29-2006, 05:12 PM
I prefer to get stronger with age, not weaker.

WBBIRL
07-29-2006, 05:16 PM
Its a hobby for me more then anything. As a younger kid (and still very much today) I was horribly anti-social. I would barely talk to the other kids at school, and never left my house once I had arrived home from school.. the exception being football camp/practice/workouts. So I started investing alot of time at the gym, not to be mega HYYYGE but for something to do. As I progress more and more now, Im sucked more and more into it. Like the 100x10 I got on DB bench a few days ago... it jacked me up like no other and drives me to get to the gym every day even when its hot as **** out and im beat from work.

Thats how I roll

Sensei
07-29-2006, 06:10 PM
Powerlifting is a competitive outlet for me. I've always loved lifting and loved competing in sports. I'm not ready for marathons or triathlons yet, but maybe someday I'll decide to drop 60lbs and give them a shot. Then again, maybe I'll just take up golf.

WillKuenzel
07-29-2006, 06:37 PM
One of the guys at the gym today was wearing a shirt that said, "What is improbable to you is normal for us."

I've always liked being a tad different from the norm and this is another avenue for me to persue that. Powerlifting also gives me a daily sense of accomplishment. Beating that PR, beating this one. The rush of doing something I've never done before.

I love the training. It makes every thing else in life seem easier. I'm a very laid back guy. I believe it enhances my life and my outlook on life.

I also love the feeling when its done right. I feel it happen, everything feels on and nothing can stop me. I feel like I could lift the world. Atlas ain't got ****. He might have carried the world but I didn't see his happy ass doing squats with it. I will.

Clifford Gillmore
07-29-2006, 09:39 PM
I'm not bright, but I can lift heavy things.

Sidior
08-01-2006, 02:28 PM
knowing I am stronger and wiser than the day before

Eszekial
08-01-2006, 02:33 PM
Being able to make progress in a sport that is not about 1 second of glory, but about months and years of training, perseverance, constant learning, and dedication, says a lot about who a person is.

KFeld
08-01-2006, 02:40 PM
http://www.wannabebigforums.com/showthread.php?threadid=573 and the Henry Rollins article which I cant find a link to.

-------

When we're in the gym, we're in this indescribable euphoria zone. It's a feeling of being on, of being completely alive and aware.

Within this haze of pleasure and pain, there's knowledge and power, self-discipline and self-reliance.

I have found the Iron to be my greatest friend. It never freaks out on me, never runs. Friends may come and go. But two hundred pounds is always two hundred pounds.

-------

Being a quiet guy, the weight room has always been an emotional outlet for me. Everytime somebody has something negative to say about me, I just kind of take it and store it in the back of my mind. Those 60 minutes in the gym 3 times a week allow me to release all my anger and frustration.

chris mason
08-01-2006, 05:36 PM
The draw is that I LOVE pure brute strength and always have. I want to be as strong as possible. I am so obsessed with it I will train to my detriment sometimes.

Bob
08-01-2006, 06:13 PM
Here is what I love about lifting iron, lifting anything heavy and bodyweight exercises:
>>pushing myself..
>>pushing my limits..
>>Competing against myself everyday..
>>health
>>brute strength
>>the way I feel
>>being able to take out my agressions against the iron
>>continued improvement
>>helping others feel great
>>be a healthy example to my kids
>>not having a rounded back when I'm 70...

phreak
08-02-2006, 04:40 AM
The draw is that I LOVE pure brute strength and always have. I want to be as strong as possible. I am so obsessed with it I will train to my detriment sometimes.
ditto.

KingWilder
08-02-2006, 05:55 AM
I just wanted a tighter ass


Seriously though, anything and everything that can improve my health/looks I'm all for. Lifting also gives me time to reflect, take out aggression, and relieve stress in a crazy world that goes way too fast.

care_bear
08-02-2006, 06:48 AM
If 3 hours a week of hard work and sweating can make you feel so good then i don't understand why anyone wouldn't want to do it

Anthony
08-02-2006, 07:02 AM
What's the draw? To be better than I was yesterday.

drew
08-02-2006, 07:11 AM
THese are all great answers. Let me take it one step further though.

Is it still worth it to you if you can't sleep some nights because of the pain? If you can't sit for more than 20 minutes without your hips cramping up? And if you often can't reach the back of your own head to shave it? If you KNOW that in 20 years you'll probably have arthritis and it will be worse?

Still worth it?

Anthony
08-02-2006, 07:14 AM
For me, no. I don't do this just for numbers, I do this to build a strong body that will allow me to be active in my golden years.

The good news is that all of your problems can be fixed. Mobility work, foam rollers, correcting muscle imbalances ... you know the drill!

WillKuenzel
08-02-2006, 07:18 AM
It is still worth it because like Anthony said, I know how to correct it. That doesn't always mean I am though. ;)

I plan on lifting for a very long time, so my training incorporates all the things that will allow me to do that. The pain I deal with is temporary and will go away. It'll come back when I lift for for a day or 2 after but the pain will not be permanent.

ritz600
08-02-2006, 07:37 AM
because i am friggin insane!!!:evillaugh

Stumprrp
08-02-2006, 07:50 AM
what does it mean? everything, its my life, its my health, it helped change my life to something completely different, its going to be my career, im goign to use to to help others, there is just to much to say.

when i am in that gym its all business, nothing stops me.

Eszekial
08-02-2006, 08:48 AM
At that expense? Hell no.

Fix your problems man!

BigRic
08-02-2006, 10:08 AM
It's all worth it for the 60 minutes on saturday.

Guido
08-02-2006, 10:29 AM
This is why:

http://barnahog.perpetualstroll.org/rollins-iron.htm

waynedang
08-02-2006, 05:09 PM
THese are all great answers. Let me take it one step further though.

Is it still worth it to you if you can't sleep some nights because of the pain? If you can't sit for more than 20 minutes without your hips cramping up? And if you often can't reach the back of your own head to shave it? If you KNOW that in 20 years you'll probably have arthritis and it will be worse?

Still worth it?

sure. I do this for fun and when it stops being fun I will quit.

I have a lot of nagging injuries from all the abuse but I learn to live with it. I would hate to say in a few years " I think I could have benched 3x bwt if i tried" this way I will know!!!!



wayne

Guido
08-03-2006, 09:43 PM
Another thing is, in powerlifting you know where you stand, and you can relish achieving little goals day in and day out. Almost every workout, I know I can set a PR in SOMETHING. In a way, it's instant gratification. In bodybuilding you rarely get that, because the improvement come much more slowly when you are measuring them by how you look in a mirror.

Clifford Gillmore
08-07-2006, 07:33 AM
I get a feeling when I get a PR, or a milestone, or whatever. Its like you thought you we're just about to die but instead of a feeling of relief there is just a bewilderment.


I must squat 700.

Bigwhitemale
08-08-2006, 02:18 AM
THese are all great answers. Let me take it one step further though.

Is it still worth it to you if you can't sleep some nights because of the pain? If you can't sit for more than 20 minutes without your hips cramping up? And if you often can't reach the back of your own head to shave it? If you KNOW that in 20 years you'll probably have arthritis and it will be worse?

Still worth it?
Then in that case, the sport may not be for you. I've been very sore many times, but I have never been so sore to the point where I couldn't sleep! That's outrageous! And it's usually bodybuilding without stretching that can make you muscle bound, not powerlifting...;)
Keep that in mind. Also, the sport of brutal feats of strength and power is NOT for everyone! If your body is telling you that it's not for you, then listen to your body. Powerlifting is for me. When I was a little kid, I was a skinny short kid, yet, I discovered I was much stronger than most kids my age and size. Not big, STRONG...That's why my sport is not bodybuilding, but it's powerlifting. Good luck

drew
08-08-2006, 07:08 AM
Oh, it's the sport for me. :D

betastas
08-08-2006, 08:48 PM
You can clearly be both big and strong. Look at wolfie. Look at Dave tate, Kaz, etc. and all the other powerlifter greats.

I like powerlifting because you get to move some heavy ass weight, feel good, and have a great sense of accomplishment when you obtain a new record. Classic bodybuilding is boring to me.

Bigwhitemale
08-09-2006, 01:31 AM
You can clearly be both big and strong. Look at wolfie. Look at Dave tate, Kaz, etc. and all the other powerlifter greats.

I like powerlifting because you get to move some heavy ass weight, feel good, and have a great sense of accomplishment when you obtain a new record. Classic bodybuilding is boring to me.
Yeah but keep in mind that in powerlifting, unless you are competing in the super heavyweigh division, what counts is how strong you are pound for pound, that means, the lighter you are while retaining a great deal of strength, the better. If you can bench twice your weight, and squat/deadlift 3 times your weight, you are a good powerlifter, competitive. Another misconception about powerlifting is that you have to look like sh*t to be a powerlifter...Not true! You can look great and be a powerlifter, you can have a six pack, be cut and shredded, looking like a bodybuilder, and yet be a great competitive powerlifter!

Clifford Gillmore
08-09-2006, 07:02 AM
You can clearly be both big and strong. Look at wolfie. Look at Dave tate, Kaz, etc. and all the other powerlifter greats.

I like powerlifting because you get to move some heavy ass weight, feel good, and have a great sense of accomplishment when you obtain a new record. Classic bodybuilding is boring to me.

Your not wrong there, my legs are in the best shape they have ever been in and I just squatted 3pps with a bit of change for a single. I see it being cool

betastas
08-09-2006, 07:53 AM
Yeah, you don't have to be overweight at all. Most of the time we do see the heaviest division of powerlifters.
I'm reminded about an link to a series of pictures that someone posted about olympic lifters in China. Lean and strong.

drew
08-09-2006, 04:07 PM
Yeah but keep in mind that in powerlifting, unless you are competing in the super heavyweigh division, what counts is how strong you are pound for pound, that means, the lighter you are while retaining a great deal of strength, the better. If you can bench twice your weight, and squat/deadlift 3 times your weight, you are a good powerlifter, competitive. Another misconception about powerlifting is that you have to look like sh*t to be a powerlifter...Not true! You can look great and be a powerlifter, you can have a six pack, be cut and shredded, looking like a bodybuilder, and yet be a great competitive powerlifter!
Yup, just look at guys like Brian Schwab, Phil Harrington, Jeff Lewis (heh)

Guido
08-10-2006, 08:04 AM
Yup, just look at guys like Brian Schwab, Phil Harrington, Jeff Lewis (heh)Franco Columbu was an excellent powerlifter, and his body sure wasn't too bad. :strong:

Bigwhitemale
08-11-2006, 02:51 AM
Franco Columbu was an excellent powerlifter, and his body sure wasn't too bad. :strong:
Exactly! He looks awesome, outstanding! He has not fat, he is huge, massive, ripped and on top of that, he was very powerful. A long time ago I was turned off by the idea of becoming a powerlifter, I used to say ''I don't wanna be a powerlifter'' people would say ''why not?'' I would say ''because, look at they way they look, they look like sh*t, I don't want to look like that!'' so I was training as a bodybuilder. Later I found out it is not necessary to look like big bag of crap to be a powerlifter, you can be huge, ripped, cut, defined in proportion, with perfect symetry, looking awesome, and still be a great powerlifter...;)

Bigwhitemale
08-11-2006, 03:25 AM
Yup, just look at guys like Brian Schwab, Phil Harrington, Jeff Lewis (heh)
I know, grotesque...LOL!

Patz
08-11-2006, 10:37 AM
THese are all great answers. Let me take it one step further though.

Is it still worth it to you if you can't sleep some nights because of the pain? If you can't sit for more than 20 minutes without your hips cramping up? And if you often can't reach the back of your own head to shave it? If you KNOW that in 20 years you'll probably have arthritis and it will be worse?

Still worth it?

No way in hell.

If I've got nagging pain, I do something about it. Training makes me feel great, and I can't count all the positives it's been in my life. But ****, man...if you can't reach behind your head, or get a night's sleep?

You're pushing too hard, and will end up a broken-down old man, before you're even a senior citizen (meaning 55).

Take a ****ing break.

fo reel

Sidior
08-11-2006, 10:44 AM
No way in hell.

If I've got nagging pain, I do something about it. Training makes me feel great, and I can't count all the positives it's been in my life. But ****, man...if you can't reach behind your head, or get a night's sleep?

You're pushing too hard, and will end up a broken-down old man, before you're even a senior citizen (meaning 55).

Take a ****ing break.

fo reel

you do what you gotta do to be the best

Guido
08-11-2006, 03:15 PM
If you know what you're doing, train smart, and listen to your body, there's no reason you should end up as a broken down old man. Plenty of very old record-breaking powerlifters can attest to that!

af92
08-20-2006, 06:13 PM
I do this stuff because:

-Just to know I'm alive
-Knowing that when I'm 70, I'll be the "tough grandpa"
-A good example for my family, since they all think I'm nuts, but I'll show them! ;)
-I want to see how big and strong I can get since I used to weigh in at 120 pounds throughout high school and that SUCKED!
-And maybe show off just a little. ;) (In a controlled way of course.)


-josh

bill
08-22-2006, 07:56 AM
THese are all great answers. Let me take it one step further though.

Is it still worth it to you if you can't sleep some nights because of the pain? If you can't sit for more than 20 minutes without your hips cramping up? And if you often can't reach the back of your own head to shave it? If you KNOW that in 20 years you'll probably have arthritis and it will be worse?

Still worth it?
Drew I think your still better off than most, who do little. I've got many injuries, but through training most don't slow me down much. Maybe I'm lying a little LOL.:cry:
I seen some of my old class mates and they may have less aches. I would thing I'm in better health overall even with a bad diet, and much better condition physically. Plus I have to keep up with guys like Chris Mason. My wife and daughter thought it was funny that he was in much better shape than I.

sharkall2003
08-22-2006, 08:19 AM
THese are all great answers. Let me take it one step further though.

Is it still worth it to you if you can't sleep some nights because of the pain? If you can't sit for more than 20 minutes without your hips cramping up? And if you often can't reach the back of your own head to shave it? If you KNOW that in 20 years you'll probably have arthritis and it will be worse?

Still worth it?

Is lifting worth it to me if I can't move in twenty years? Let me give you a one word answer and then elaborate. YES! Weightlifting has helped me in every aspect of life. It's made me stronger physically through literally making me stronger, faster, and larger. It's made me mentally stronger because I have more confidence, self-control, better anger-management ect. It's made me stronger spiritually because I learned how to pray and use other means of praying. Everything to me revolves around the body. If your body is weak then you're weak mentally and spiritually because the body protects the spirit and the mind.

Westsidemonster
09-12-2006, 03:35 AM
Then in that case, the sport may not be for you. I've been very sore many times, but I have never been so sore to the point where I couldn't sleep! That's outrageous! And it's usually bodybuilding without stretching that can make you muscle bound, not powerlifting...;)
Keep that in mind. Also, the sport of brutal feats of strength and power is NOT for everyone! If your body is telling you that it's not for you, then listen to your body. Powerlifting is for me. When I was a little kid, I was a skinny short kid, yet, I discovered I was much stronger than most kids my age and size. Not big, STRONG...That's why my sport is not bodybuilding, but it's powerlifting. Good luck

I feel the same way!...Man, you came across some interesting points...