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fixationdarknes
08-01-2006, 06:23 PM
I'm currently taking Accutane for my acne problems, and today when I met with the doctor to get my prescription for my third month, he told me my cholesterol was a little bit too high (not anything to really worry about though). I've never had cholesterol problems, and from what I hear young people rarely ever have cholesterol problems at all.

My mom had pretty high cholesterol. She had to take some stuff to reduce it or something. I hope this doesn't mean I'll have high cholesterol when I'm older.

So, what actually causes cholesterol and how can I avoid future problems with it? I eat a lot of saturated fats from peanut butter, milk, eggs, and meat. But I've always these fats and cholesterols are good for you and these cholesterols are "healthy cholesterols" and will actually reduce "bad cholesterols?" Something along those lines.

Any input?

Paladyr
08-01-2006, 07:23 PM
I'm currently taking Accutane for my acne problems, and today when I met with the doctor to get my prescription for my third month, he told me my cholesterol was a little bit too high (not anything to really worry about though). I've never had cholesterol problems, and from what I hear young people rarely ever have cholesterol problems at all.

My mom had pretty high cholesterol. She had to take some stuff to reduce it or something. I hope this doesn't mean I'll have high cholesterol when I'm older.

So, what actually causes cholesterol and how can I avoid future problems with it? I eat a lot of saturated fats from peanut butter, milk, eggs, and meat. But I've always these fats and cholesterols are good for you and these cholesterols are "healthy cholesterols" and will actually reduce "bad cholesterols?" Something along those lines.

Any input?

I am in the same boat as you. Basically your doc will want you to come back in a year and test your cholesterol again. As long as it stays the same, this is your "baseline" cholesterol level. He will only become concerned if it starts going up.

As a precaution, I would watch your saturated fat intake, and make sure you are getting plenty of good fats (fish oils are a good supplement for this).

Nosaj
08-01-2006, 07:47 PM
Eat more meat! :clap:

Stray
08-01-2006, 08:06 PM
Part diet, part genetics.

Beast
08-01-2006, 08:23 PM
Sounds like high cholesterol runs in your family. If I were you, I would avoid taking in a lot of saturated fat, especially trans fats. Genetics and high intakes of trans/saturated fats have the most effects on high levels of LDL ("bad" cholesterol) and low levels of HDL ("good" cholesterol).

This has everything about cholesterol. Check out the links on the left:
http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=512

fixationdarknes
08-02-2006, 08:31 AM
I thought saturated fats was good for you.

Steele
08-02-2006, 08:52 AM
Well, all kinds of fat fall into HDL's and LDL's. LDL's are the better like someone said, these are basically Omega 3's/6's and polyunsaturated/monounsaturated fats; the kind you find in fish oils/olive oils, and the fats from nuts/eggs.

HDL's are the bad sort, like transfats/too much saturated fat from red meat and the like, which if taken in excess also cause a buildup of visceral fat which sits on your waistline.

And in your arteries :p

-Steele

ddegroff
08-02-2006, 09:27 AM
^I think your confused HDL's are good, LDL's are bad. They aren't in food, but in the body.

Fix, saturated fat is needed but in high amounts it can cause problems.

Steele
08-02-2006, 09:30 AM
Oh yeah :p Sorry, drawing much of that from memory. The good things i mentioned increase your level of HDLs, and the bad ones increase your level of LDLs =)

-Steele

ddegroff
08-02-2006, 09:38 AM
Well being technical the only way to really raise HDL level's is through exercise.

Check out the link Beast posted.

Steele
08-02-2006, 09:56 AM
I'm way out of my depth, gonna step aside (:

-Conan

Built
08-02-2006, 10:39 AM
My HDL went up, my LDL went down, and my total cholesterol went down when I started Atkins and lifting weights 5 years ago.

I've kept it down on a high protein, moderately high fat (including saturated animal fat) diet while lifting heavy and keeping my weight and carbohydrate consumption under control.

Squats and cottage cheese work better than Lipitor.

fixationdarknes
08-03-2006, 12:08 PM
So, when I start lifting again that will help cholesterol levels too? And just keep eating healthy fats?

the doc
08-03-2006, 02:15 PM
cholesterol is made in the liver and supplemented by dietary sources. It is an essential componet of every cell in your body. It is also a nonionic surfactant used to stabilize fatty acid chains transported in low density lipoproteins

cholesterol build up in the wrong areas (arteries) is the problem

Bruise Brubaker
08-04-2006, 08:17 PM
This is an "alternative" theory but it makes sense to me.

It's not very precise, I just try to summarize it in my own words. The idea is that high oxidative stress and inflammation damages your arteries, the body increases the cholesterol because it is an important part of the cells, in order to repair these arteries. Cholesterol is also an antioxidant. Oxidized cholesterol and oxidized fatty acids (polyinsaturated being the much fragile) can build up in plaque and clog the arteries.

Saturated, monoinsaturated and a more limited but well balanced (omega 3 to 6) amount of polyinsaturated are needed for healthy cholesterol levels. Trans fatty acids disturbs a few things, by competing with their mirror cis fats I believe and disturbing the processes in which they are involved.

My beliefs are that a diet high in fat and in protein while being very low in carbohydrates. By the way, ketosis is temporary. It is logical to me that we've evolved to use at their best the foods that are the most concentrated source of calories, while still having the capacity to handle a large variety of foods in order to survive during time where concentrated calories are scarce (such as when the hunted animals are themselves too lean).

Exercise is also key, especially if your diet is high in iron (such as a diet high in meat), unless you tend to bleed regularly.

aBrutis
08-05-2006, 10:19 PM
Squats and cottage cheese work better than Lipitor.
What a world this would be if we could tattoo that across every MD's forehead.
(Backwards, so they could read it in the mirror)

the doc
08-25-2006, 05:24 PM
ha! you think physicians dont tell them to exercise? 99% of 'em have no interest whatsoever in any kind of exercise so you do the next best thing which is to get them on lipitor

Fat guy
08-25-2006, 06:51 PM
there is good cholesterol and bad cholesterol

bad cholesterol comes from animal fat only

Beast
08-25-2006, 07:28 PM
ha! you think physicians dont tell them to exercise? 99% of 'em have no interest whatsoever in any kind of exercise so you do the next best thing which is to get them on lipitor
:nod:
It's nearly impossible to get certain people to exercise.

Bruise Brubaker
08-26-2006, 10:13 AM
there is good cholesterol and bad cholesterol

bad cholesterol comes from animal fat only

Huh.

ALL dietary cholesterol comes from animal fat only.


And "bad" cholesterol DOES have a role in the body and is not bad at all. It's a matter of ratios.
According to some Atkins book, eating carrots and any other vegetable high in beta-carotene will slightly increase bad cholesterol as this cholesterol is required to carry the stuff in the blood.

Holto
08-26-2006, 12:18 PM
This is an "alternative" theory but it makes sense to me.

It's not very precise, I just try to summarize it in my own words. The idea is that high oxidative stress and inflammation damages your arteries, the body increases the cholesterol because it is an important part of the cells, in order to repair these arteries. Cholesterol is also an antioxidant. Oxidized cholesterol and oxidized fatty acids (polyinsaturated being the much fragile) can build up in plaque and clog the arteries.

Apparently there are several theories, but this is the only one I have ever come accross.

In a nutshell your body is losing the battle against free radicals and your body produces the only anti oxidant that it can produce, cholesterol. (Correct me if I'm wrong on this one)

A polar bear for example can produce vitamin C. Probably a good thing after eating 100-200lbs of seal and fish.

hemants
08-28-2006, 08:37 AM
Here's a simple table

Saturated fats - raise HDL and LDL
Unsaturated fats - raise HDL
Trans fats - raise LDL
Exercise, oats?, and soy products - raise HDL

Dietary cholesterol - raise LDL in some people, not everyone responds this way though.

Holto
08-28-2006, 10:39 AM
Dietary cholesterol - raise LDL in some people, not everyone responds this way though.

I'm not sure if this was stated but something like 80-95% of the cholesterol in your body is manufactured by the body.

There is very little correlation with dietary choleterol and the levels in the body.

hemants
08-29-2006, 06:27 AM
I'm not sure if this was stated but something like 80-95% of the cholesterol in your body is manufactured by the body.

There is very little correlation with dietary choleterol and the levels in the body.

Depends on the individual. For some people there is a direct correlation. Not everyone responds to dietary cholesterol.

Personally I eat 2-3 eggs per day without worry.