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kad
08-22-2006, 10:24 AM
Hey all, I bought a 12 pack of the new diet lipton green tea bottles, and was wondering if anyone had any thoughts on the ingredients list. The ingredients look ok, but I'm not so sure about the preservatives, since I normally try to stay away from those.


Contains:
water, citric acid, green tea,
sodium hexametaphosphate,
ascorbic acid (to protect flavor),
honey,
phosphoric acid,
sodium benzoate (preserves freshness),
natural flavors, aspartame,
potassium sorbate (preserves freshness),
acesulfame potassium,
calcium disodium edta (to protect flavor),
caramel color, yellow 5, blue 1

Are any of these particularly bad for you? I noticed that there isn't any high fructose corn syrup or anything like that, so I thought they should be alright. The diet drinks have 0 calories and 70mg of sodium per serving.

edit: At any rate, I think I'm going to save my money and stick to the real stuff next time.

TheGimp
08-22-2006, 11:47 AM
I guess it depends how much you care about artificial sweeteners like aspartame.

Personally I would stick to the real thing or just take a green tea extract supplement.

kad
08-22-2006, 12:51 PM
Thanks. I normally try to limit aspartame based drinks to my cheat meals and eating out (I'll have a diet coke or something usually). I had thought about getting an EGCG supplement. Are there any advantages or drawbacks to using those over just drinking the real thing? Other than the obvious.

Bruise Brubaker
08-22-2006, 01:02 PM
And how much you care about all the other preservatives and dies...

There might also be very little of green tea goodies in the product, although the antioxidants («to protect "flavor"») might do their job correctly, I'm not sure.

You'd be better with the real stuff, and adding your own sweeteners if you really want to improve the taste.

Green tea is already good at staining the teeth, the added acids certainly don't help.


Sodium benzoate is a preservative added to carbonated beverages, but those drinks that also have added citric or ascorbic acid (vitamin C, E300) can be susceptible to the formation of benzene as a degradation product. At least that’s the theory.


It can be identified in soft drinks by 'sodium benzoate' or E211. Health officials warn that excessive consumption can seriously damage your health.

Didn't find anything against potassium sorbate.
I had a class this winter about food contaminants and learned that sorbate can not be legally found with sodium nitrite in the same food as this lead to the formation of toxins. So don't drink your stuff while eating bacon, hehe.


Anyway the benefits of green tea might overrule the bad stuff and the product is probably ok but stick to the cheap good natural stuff.

Bruise Brubaker
08-22-2006, 01:07 PM
I also believe in the synergy between the different elements of green tea, including the cafeine.

Although isolated ECGC seems to have benefits in studies. Scientists usually prefer to isolate the one compound that has the benefits, as it is easier to study how it works and what it does exactly. Nothing wrong with that.

So do as you wish!

Slim Schaedle
08-22-2006, 01:09 PM
Hey all, I bought a 12 pack of the new diet lipton green tea bottles, and was wondering if anyone had any thoughts on the ingredients list. The ingredients look ok, but I'm not so sure about the preservatives, since I normally try to stay away from those.



Are any of these particularly bad for you? I noticed that there isn't any high fructose corn syrup or anything like that, so I thought they should be alright. The diet drinks have 0 calories and 70mg of sodium per serving.

edit: At any rate, I think I'm going to save my money and stick to the real stuff next time.
If there is honey, there is fructose. So your decision on whether that is ok or not depends on how much there is.

Bruise Brubaker
08-22-2006, 01:18 PM
Honey comes 6 or 7th in the ingredients, so there is very very little of it.
Honey is half glucose half fructose.

TheGimp
08-22-2006, 01:34 PM
Are there any advantages or drawbacks to using those over just drinking the real thing?

I've heard you need to drink about 4 cups of green tea to get the same amount as whatever's in your standard green tea extract. I guess it's personal opinion as to whether 4 cups is a drawback or not. Also, I personally think there is something to be said for the appetite suppression qualities of a hot drink that (and this is IMO) not particularly pleasant tasting if you're on a cut.


If there is honey, there is fructose. So your decision on whether that is ok or not depends on how much there is.

He said the drinks have 0 cals per serving. While this clearly means they've fiddled the serving size so that the cals contributed by the honey are rounded down, there can't be that many of them.

Slim Schaedle
08-22-2006, 02:42 PM
I've heard you need to drink about 4 cups of green tea to get the same amount as whatever's in your standard green tea extract. I guess it's personal opinion as to whether 4 cups is a drawback or not. Also, I personally think there is something to be said for the appetite suppression qualities of a hot drink that (and this is IMO) not particularly pleasant tasting if you're on a cut.



He said the drinks have 0 cals per serving. While this clearly means they've fiddled the serving size so that the cals contributed by the honey are rounded down, there can't be that many of them.
Score -1 for my reading comprehension.

I missed the zero calorie thing.