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Reinier
02-02-2002, 11:27 AM
just what is protein availability?

how and where in the body is protein created? (cuz it has to be as many humans/animals hardly eat any and still have lots of protein in their bodies)

What are the differences between amino acids?

How necessary is it to eat some of them all?

What is the science behind the link between kidney problems and a high protein diet?

What is whey? is it like a plant of some kind or a chemically created substance?

The_Chicken_Daddy
02-02-2002, 11:55 AM
Originally posted by Reinier
just what is protein availability?

how and where in the body is protein created? (cuz it has to be as many humans/animals hardly eat any and still have lots of protein in their bodies)

The body puts together amino acids into long chains called peptides. These can be manipulated by bending and compacting them into various proteins. rah rah rah...

What are the differences between amino acids?

Their structures.

How necessary is it to eat some of them all?

All? not at all. The essential eight aminos? vital. Your body can produce all other aminos from these eight. A protein sources is said to be 'incomplete' unless it has all these 8 present.

What is the science behind the link between kidney problems and a high protein diet?

Flawed tests. They used people who already had kidney defects.

What is whey? is it like a plant of some kind or a chemically created substance?

It is a collective term for 'whey types' of of protein. There are many forms of whey. for example, you can call it a cat, but there are many varieties of cat. same applies for whey. [whey isolate, concentrate, hydrolysed etc...]

[/B]

Reinier
02-02-2002, 12:31 PM
just what is protein availability?

**wasn`t answered**

how and where in the body is protein created? (cuz it has to be as many humans/animals hardly eat any and still have lots of protein in their bodies)

The body puts together amino acids into long chains called peptides. These can be manipulated by bending and compacting them into various proteins. rah rah rah...

**i know about peptides and stuff but how does your body create these when they are not in the diet? I know ribosomes are organelles that create peptides but i could hardly imagine this happening on a cellular scale**

What are the differences between amino acids?

Their structures.

**I figured. let me reformulate. What are the differences between their structures?**

How necessary is it to eat some of them all?

All? not at all. The essential eight aminos? vital. Your body can produce all other aminos from these eight. A protein sources is said to be 'incomplete' unless it has all these 8 present.

What is the science behind the link between kidney problems and a high protein diet?

Flawed tests. They used people who already had kidney defects.

**does this mean that any % difference of kidney failure in bodybuilders that lies higher than in the general populatio would be due to use of stimulating substances rather than a high protein diet?**

What is whey? is it like a plant of some kind or a chemically created substance?

It is a collective term for 'whey types' of of protein. There are many forms of whey. for example, you can call it a cat, but there are many varieties of cat. same applies for whey. [whey isolate, concentrate, hydrolysed etc...]

**i know there are different kinds. but where do they come from are they a purified substance from a meat or a plant or are they made in a factory of some sort?**

The_Chicken_Daddy
02-02-2002, 12:46 PM
protein availability?

I'd hazard a guess that it is how available protein is at any one time. eg you have a higher protein availability after eating than you do if you starved for 15 hours. Maybe it is reference to how much muscle you have too? eg once in starvation mode, someone with more muscle mass have a higher protein availability than someone with little muscle mass [latty.]

If not in the diet, your body breaks itself down to supply aminos for vital organs. for instance, the heart has priority over your muscle tissue. This is why protein is essential for every human being on earth. And also why malnutrition can lead to death.

It's a little more complicated than this, but think of ribosomes as the zipper on your Levis and the aminos as the little metal bits. The ribosome 'zips' the aminos together to form peptides. Just if yo're interested...

Difference in amino structures goes on for like...ever man!

Some have more methyl groups [CH3], some have longer chain lengths, some have double bonds on the amine group, some have sulphur groups, honestly man this could take a while...

I honesty doubt high protein diets is responsible for the high rate of kidney failure in BBers. Incidentally, i have never heard of this characteristic. I thinkSevered ties would be of use on this particular topic.

Whey comes from milk. :)

Milk is about 80% casein and 20% whey. It's processed into powders from common milk. This is why most on this board push milk as a great protein source.

CBates
02-03-2002, 05:46 PM
Originally posted by The_Chicken_Daddy

Whey comes from milk. :)

Milk is about 80% casein and 20% whey. It's processed into powders from common milk. This is why most on this board push milk as a great protein source.


If this is so, why do some suggest to have milk before bed because of the slow digestion, but go against whey before bed. What makes the whey digest much faster than milk?

Blood&Iron
02-03-2002, 06:28 PM
Go here, it will answer all of your questions, and a bunch you didn't know you had:

http://www.onr.com/user/lylemcd/

Severed Ties
02-03-2002, 08:53 PM
CD I think what he means by protein availability is the difference in protein BV.

Frequent protein consumption is required because your body can only use so many amino acids at one time, the rest get turned into glucose, so you would see a difference between BB'ers who eat 200 grams of protein in one meal as opposed to 6 or 8 meals.


I honesty doubt high protein diets is responsible for the high rate of kidney failure in BBers. Incidentally, i have never heard of this characteristic. I think Severed ties would be of use on this particular topic.

High protein diets do not cause kidney damage in healthy kidneys. However consuming 60% of your calories from protein is not "high" it's excessive, which can cause problems over a prolonged period of time. As for bodybuilders having a higher rate of kidney failure, I don't where you came up with that notion but it would be very easy to set up a study showing such. Just round up enough pro's and compare their kidney functions from their extreme diets and drug use to a non-BB'er and now you have scientific "proof" that bodybuilding causes kidney failure.

Truth is BB'ers develop kidney problems primarily from diuretics. Mind you the other plethora of pharmacuticals are no walk in the park on the kidneys. Combine those factors with the 6000-9000 calorie requirements their bodies must process on a day to day basis and it's a wonder more aren't dropping dead.

ST

The_Chicken_Daddy
02-04-2002, 11:12 AM
Originally posted by CBates



If this is so, why do some suggest to have milk before bed because of the slow digestion, but go against whey before bed. What makes the whey digest much faster than milk?

like i said earlier, milk is 80% casein which is a slow digesting protein. Although the whey will digest quickly in comparison, some whey absorbtion will be slowed because of the casein. I'm guessing there's a difference in protein structure causing different rates of digestion.

Thanks for the input ST :thumbup:

Chris Rodgers
02-04-2002, 11:14 AM
Little muscle mass eh biatch??


Go deadlift 50 lbs stilts! :ninja:

The_Chicken_Daddy
02-04-2002, 11:24 AM
why would i deadlift stilts?

and why do they have to be that heavy?

;)

Maki Riddington
02-04-2002, 04:49 PM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by The_Chicken_Daddy
[B]protein availability?

I'd hazard a guess that it is how available protein is at any one time. eg you have a higher protein availability after eating than you do if you starved for 15 hours. Maybe it is reference to how much muscle you have too? eg once in starvation mode, someone with more muscle mass have a higher protein availability than someone with little muscle mass [latty.]

*** The amount of amino acids in the bodys amino acid pool.
The higher the amount the body has to draw upon from it's pool the greater protein avaliability. The body recycles anywhere from 100-300 grams a day.
Nutrition ain't my thing like I've said before but I hope that helped.

Blood&Iron
02-04-2002, 05:17 PM
Originally posted by Blood&Iron
Go here, it will answer all of your questions, and a bunch you didn't know you had:

http://www.onr.com/user/lylemcd/

GO TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. IT WILL ANSWER ALL YOUR QUESTIONS. TRUST ME. BEST THING I'VE EVER READ ON PROTEIN.

PowerManDL
02-04-2002, 05:32 PM
You're really obsessed with this Lyle McDonald fellow, aren't you?

Blood&Iron
02-05-2002, 10:16 AM
Originally posted by PowerManDL
You're really obsessed with this Lyle McDonald fellow, aren't you?
No. It's just I haven't seen anyone come even close to him, in terms of his ability to explain complex subjects so they are both interesting and comprehensible. And as I said, his article on protein is easily the best thing I've ever read on the subject. Besides, people keep asking the same, very basic questions and I've posted a resource that will easily answer these questions and has a great deal more information to boot. Since people seemed to ignore it, I merely thought a good bit of shouting might help.

On a side not, I suppose I'm sort of a sucker for the Fuhrer-princip. Find someone and just blindly follow. Well, not really, but I'm a sucker for an expert. Still, I disagree with McDonald from time to time.

The_Chicken_Daddy
02-05-2002, 10:28 AM
They're good articles, thank you for showing me.

When does part three come out?

Blood&Iron
02-05-2002, 10:52 AM
Originally posted by The_Chicken_Daddy
They're good articles, thank you for showing me.

When does part three come out?
No idea. It might already have been written. Check at:

www.mesomorphosis.com