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gweedoboy
09-22-2006, 05:35 PM
Hi,

New member here, intermediate to fitness.

Here's the deal. Trying to bulk. I'm 5' 9", 153 lbs, 26 years old.

I threw my numbers into Fit Day and right now I'm about this:

Totals: 3546 calories 152 fat, 248 carbs, 308 protein, which breaks down to 39% fat, 26% carbs, and 35% protein.

5th week into bulk, have put on 16 lbs since I started. At first it was going in the right places, now I'm noticing it's starting to hit the love handles and stomach some. Fat calories are about 70% unsaturated, 30% saturated right now, that damn cheese is a vice for me. Carbs is pretty much all 100% whole wheat bread, with the occasional burrito here and there. Seems like maybe I have too many fat calories and the carbs seem a little low. But if I'm already noticing a fat increase, I'm hesitant to increase carbs.

Also, I'm pretty thin and my metabolism is like the freakin tasmanian devil, so I'm a little surprised to see fat gain on only 3500 calories.

Suggestions?

Thanks to anyone who takes the time to reply.

kad
09-22-2006, 05:40 PM
You could drop them a little and trade for some carbs if you wanted, no harm in doing that IMO. As long as you stay above your minimum fat intake (0.5g/lb LBM for fat, and 1g/lb LBM protein - both of which you're pretty well clear of). You might also notice more of a benefit from the kinds of carbs you're eating. Bread is notorious for holding a lot of water. Try switching it up and eating some oats, brown rice, sweet potatos (or even regular potatos). Your body needs the nutrients from different sources.

Built
09-22-2006, 06:46 PM
30% of your fat from saturates is pretty much what Berardi suggests, actually.

Move some of your cals into carb and out of fat if you like, but it's not likely to make much of a difference - what will make a bigger difference is the calories: if they're too high, you'll get fat. Coming from carbs won't make any difference to this, if you're controlling your caloric intake.

MagnaSephiroth
09-22-2006, 07:10 PM
3500 kcals seems a bit much for someone of your weight... Thats probibly where the love handels are coming from. Dont focus on percents (unless its the sat fat percent) focus on hitting grams, or even better, calories.

Powdered_Power
09-23-2006, 07:47 AM
3500+ calories is definately excessive for your bodyweight in my opinion. A good guideline to go by is your bodyweight x 16 or 17 (when bulking). approx. 2500-2600 cals a day.

Also 308 gr of protein daily at your bodyweight is too much, the excess of this which you do not use will be turned into fat anyway. Bring your intake down for a week and see where you stand. 16lbs in 5 weeks is a bit extreme...

kad
09-23-2006, 08:29 AM
2500-2600 calories a day sounds like cutting calories... The "guideline" of 16-17xBW is rubbish, and we all know that around here. The general consensus around these parts is the only "real" way to find your bulking calories is to track your food for a week on fitday. If you don't gain any weight, than that's *your* maintenance calories. Start adding on 10-20% a week to *your* maintenance calories, not some formula, until you start gaining. If you start getting too fat, cut your calories back some. It really is that easy.

edit: And yes, I do agree that 16 lbs in 5 weeks is a bit much, which is probably where the fat gain came from. Ideally you want to stick between 1-2lbs/week weight gain.

ktm
09-23-2006, 02:58 PM
Protein does not get converted to fat by the body.

gweedoboy
09-23-2006, 03:39 PM
2500-2600 calories a day sounds like cutting calories... The "guideline" of 16-17xBW is rubbish, and we all know that around here. The general consensus around these parts is the only "real" way to find your bulking calories is to track your food for a week on fitday. If you don't gain any weight, than that's *your* maintenance calories. Start adding on 10-20% a week to *your* maintenance calories, not some formula, until you start gaining. If you start getting too fat, cut your calories back some. It really is that easy.

edit: And yes, I do agree that 16 lbs in 5 weeks is a bit much, which is probably where the fat gain came from. Ideally you want to stick between 1-2lbs/week weight gain.

Hrmm, I agree. 16 - 17 cal/lb might be ok for meso bulk, but I'm definitely more towards the ecto side. At 23 years old I had never touched weights and I was 5' 9" 125 lbs. I lifted and ate my way up to 155 and I definitely packed on some fat due to a poor diet (a lot of simple sugars) but I increased my bench press by 60 lbs during that time and made similar stength gains across the board in all exercises. I did a short cutting phase at that point, and was at 145 and kept nearly all the stength I had gained during the bulk. Then I got injured...

I don't think those kinds of gains will last. I was out of lifting for 2 years due to a shoulder injury and lack of medical insurance. Finally got insurance, got physical therapy and it's all better now, but during the time off, I dropped from 145 to 134 lbs, most of which was muscle. Lucklily, muscle memory is a mighty force and I'm at about 90-95% of the strength levels I left off at.

Thanks for the advice. I think I am gonna swap some of the fat for brown rice for a week or two and maybe dial the calories back to 3200 and see what happens.

whiteman90909
09-23-2006, 07:33 PM
16 lbs in 5 weeks is a little bit fast, I suggest you try slowing down the bulk a little bit.

Built
09-23-2006, 11:10 PM
Protein does not get converted to fat by the body.

Cool.

Wanna explain why protein calories have this magical property?

CrazyK
09-24-2006, 12:19 AM
Cool.

Wanna explain why protein calories have this magical property?He's obviously wrong, but it is the most difficult of the Macro's to convert to fat. Which means your body burns more calories processing it in to fat, which means less gets stored assuming your calories are the same with a diet less in protein.

Built
09-24-2006, 12:48 AM
Mmmmm God bless the TEF of protein!

CrazyK
09-24-2006, 12:51 AM
Mmmmm God bless the TEF of protein!Yes! Yes! So high protein, moderate carb, low fat is? ;)

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
09-24-2006, 12:52 AM
Yes! Yes! So high protein, moderate carb, low fat is is? ;)*strangles you*

:)

CrazyK
09-24-2006, 01:48 AM
*strangles you*

:)hahaha :hello:

Davidelmo
09-24-2006, 04:50 AM
Dont forget how tiny the TEF actually is though.

The way I've always looked at it is that as long as total calories and protein are okay I dont worry too much about everything else. Getting 0.5g fat per lb bodyweight is effortless unless you are purposely avoiding fat for some reason.

If you're noticing fat gain coming on too quickly, bring your calories down. From the figures you posted, it doesn't really mater where those calories come from. I'd even go so far as to say that your protein is too high - 2g per lb bodyweight. I've never seen a piece of evidence that suggests that much protein will help you any more than 1g/lb would. If you're happy with it, then there's probably no harm done, but don't stress too much if you're not getting 300g a day.

If I were you I would cut down to 3000kcal with 200g protein, 300 carbs and 120 fat. That's just me though.

DoUgL@S
09-24-2006, 09:07 AM
Totals: 3546 calories 152 fat, 248 carbs, 308 protein, which breaks down to 39% fat, 26% carbs, and 35% protein.

5th week into bulk, have put on 16 lbs since I started

1-2 lbs a week has been established as the best way to gain weight wiht the most favourable LBM/fat ratio.

If you use 2 lbs/wk, you gained an excess of 6 lbs during the five weeks. 3500 cals/lbs of fat * 6 lbs of fat = 21,000 cals
21,000 cals/ 5 weeks = 4,200 cals per week or 600 cals per day.

In this scenario you are over eating 600 cals per day. If you use 1 lb/wk, and use a similar calculation you are over eating 1,100 cals per day.

Eat between 600-1,100 cals per day less and you should be gaining slower, thus less fat.