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Maki Riddington
10-09-2006, 09:38 PM
Those of you who are competitive athletes understand (I hope) that it takes a lot of hard work to become the very best you can be. It takes many hours of practice, pushing through injuries and not allowing yourself to succumb to the mental block of giving in because things are just too hard.

There is only one motto I live by when I am training in the gym, on the mat or outside in the pouring rain. That is: Hurt in Practice so you Don't Bleed in Battle! This means very simply that you can not expect extraordinary results with an ordinary effort. The worst thing that can happen to you during a training session is that you get tired. That's all.
If you tear yourself down during practice and aim beyond what your goal is, when it comes time to compete things will be a lot easier on you.

I hope those of you who are training hard for any sport bear this in mind the next time you feel like giving up during a training sesion.

stevec087
10-10-2006, 12:38 PM
Truer words have never been spoken. Yesterday at lacrosse practice our coach made us do soo many sprints. I was dead tired after the first two sprints (one sprint = full field, across and back). I thought about giving up, feigning an injury, but deep down I knew that I needed this conditioning to make myself a better player. I pushed through all 7 sprints and I felt so great once they were over knowing that I was in better shape.

Hazerboy
10-16-2006, 12:31 AM
"It takes many hours of practice, pushing through injuries..."
"This means very simply that you can not expect extraordinary results with an ordinary effort"
"The worst thing that can happen to you during a training session is that you get tired. That's all."

Ok. So if you train hard you'll be good, sure. Don't give up during conditioning, got it. But "pushing through injuries" is an awful philosophy. I have seen 3 or 4 good wrestlers just get hurt worse and been out longer because of this - all because our coaches just kept telling them to "suck it up" and "keep going." In fact, my junior year I was wrestling dehydrated and malnourished against a great opponent during practice when I dislocated my knee. So yes, you can get seriously injured in a training session, especially when your coach doesn't know when to stop. There's pushing the limits of your physical conditioning and then there is absurdity - I only wish more coaches new the line.

If you're injured you're injured, and only the athlete knows when he can/cannot train/compete. If he's faking it then its only him that is missing out. Dave Tate could have had many more years in his powerfliting career (or at least average mobility!) if he didn't keep pushing through his injuries to set new PRs.

crazedwombat
10-16-2006, 01:47 PM
He means injury that's not serious...not tears or breaks, but an ankle sprain or cut or something like that. Every sport the best never go in 100%, there's always some kind of small injury that's forgotten. Same with wrestling. Yea some say they do but they're probably not training their hardest and wont be the best.

clawhammer_33
10-16-2006, 02:19 PM
Those of you who are competitive athletes understand (I hope) that it takes a lot of hard work to become the very best you can be. It takes many hours of practice, pushing through injuries and not allowing yourself to succumb to the mental block of giving in because things are just too hard.

There is only one motto I live by when I am training in the gym, on the mat or outside in the pouring rain. That is: Hurt in Practice so you Don't Bleed in Battle! This means very simply that you can not expect extraordinary results with an ordinary effort. The worst thing that can happen to you during a training session is that you get tired. That's all.
If you tear yourself down during practice and aim beyond what your goal is, when it comes time to compete things will be a lot easier on you.

I hope those of you who are training hard for any sport bear this in mind the next time you feel like giving up during a training sesion.


I think I'll print this out and give this to some friends.

laxguy1028
10-16-2006, 04:41 PM
I really needed this reminder right know....perfect timing

Maki Riddington
10-16-2006, 07:16 PM
"It takes many hours of practice, pushing through injuries..."

But "pushing through injuries" is an awful philosophy.

An athlete should know when they can push and when to back off. Sometimes they push at the wrong times and put their body at risk. But that's what competeing is all about, pushing the limits.

I have been grappling injured for the last year. I have a partially torn rotator cuff and a seperated AC joint. I coud have easily called it quits but I haven't.
The drive to be great means that I must push through even if I'm not 100%.

Obviously there are certain situations that warrent an athlete to take a complete step back and stop training. However for the most part, you just got to do it! It's that mentality that nothing is going to get in your way which needs to be at the forefront of your mind everytime you step foot onto the mat, field, ice or in the gym.

Con
10-16-2006, 07:25 PM
Maki, simply inspirational. I was telling myself this the other day when I was working out with some guys from the army. They were just saying, keep going, and I listened to em. I came out of feelin my chest hurtin, but I knew it wasnt an injury, it was me becoming stronger.

I now am gonna start applyin this concept to the crossfit im incorporating in my routine, cuz I know its going to challenge me in different ways, and I will want to quit.

Good post.

Adam
10-16-2006, 07:29 PM
This one above is one of my favorites:
"This means very simply that you can not expect extraordinary results with an ordinary effort"

I half agree with Maki and half Hazer on the 'pushing' issue.
If something hurts (bad) I won't keep pushing. However, I try to always find a substitute so that I can continue training. This might mean switching movements, intensity, or duration.

Maki Riddington
10-16-2006, 08:21 PM
This one above is one of my favorites:
"This means very simply that you can not expect extraordinary results with an ordinary effort"

I half agree with Maki and half Hazer on the 'pushing' issue.
If something hurts (bad) I won't keep pushing. However, I try to always find a substitute so that I can continue training. This might mean switching movements, intensity, or duration.

If it hurts modify it. But you can still work through it in most cases. When I roll on the mat I have to work on perfecting my form and technique and not rely on my strength because my shoulders are hurting. The same applies to training in the gym.

Fuzzy
10-17-2006, 06:55 AM
This reminds me of the time I disloacted my shoulder in rugby. Clean pop out the socket.

Big burly rugby coach holds me down, pops the sucker backs in and kicks my ass out to the field.

Yar....

twcolabear
10-20-2006, 04:50 PM
I think I'm going to print out Maki's saying and post it on my wall. Funny I was feeling lazy sitting at work today, but i just read that and I can't wait to go to my taekwondo session in a few hours.

Dinosaur
10-20-2006, 04:52 PM
I just think back to the time where I saw a guy with cerebal palsy competing with us in a strongman competition and pulling a 16k vehicle literally on his hands and knees, never quitting the whole time. He would've used his teeth if he had to, it was one of the most awesome things I have ever seen.