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Bamm
11-09-2006, 04:21 PM
I want to run the 100 meter dash i've never ran track before i've always been a pretty good runner but ive always been bigger then everyone else. I had a broken ankel during summer ever since that healed ive been squatting heavy and now it seems that i might have broken that barrier to be fast. My brother ran track his best 100 time was like 10.98 he was really lazy tho and never worked to hard to improve his time my mom also had taken 7th place in state in the 100meter dash. with all that being said i kinda wanna follow what they did and be pretty good in the 100.

Im asking you guys to tell me what you know about the 100 meter dash from form to breathing. Im going to start back up creatine in the next few days I've always read and heard that improves sprinting speeds. I will be trying to time myself in the next week or so.

Right now when i run i have the worse form or thats what im told i bob my head like crazy. If i had a guess on my 100meter dash time at this moment it would be below 11.6 but higher then 11.

aming37
11-10-2006, 11:10 PM
Okay, here it goes:

To improve your 100m time you're going to want to focus on improving power, core strength and linear speed. Your muscles must be able to apply force through a full range of motion. That means that you should be relatively flexible.

Power
As far as lifting goes the best exercises you can do are:
-Cleans (both power cleans and hang cleans)
-Squats
-Deadlifts
-Lunges
-Bench Press
-Pull-Ups
-Bent-Over Rows
-Shoulder Press & Push Press

Since you use your legs to transfer most of the power generated by your core when sprinting, you want your legs to be very powerful. I would discourage you from using machines such as the leg extension and leg curl as they provide virtually no benefit to the core which is where most of your power is generated. If you like doing single joint exercises such as bicep curls and DB front/side/rear raises, they won't hurt. But they probably won't help much either.

Core Strength and Stabilization
Although all of the previous lifts work your core to some extent, I think that doing core-specific exercises is beneficial. If you don't have access to a Balance Ball/Physioball/Swiss Ball I would reccomend buying one. They increase the difficulty of most exercises by forcing your body to stabilize itself by engaging its deep abdominal muscles: your transverse abdominis and your internal obliques
-Russian Twist on Balance Ball
-Weighted Crunch on Balance Ball
-Barbell Roll-Out
-Front and Side Bridge with Feet on Balance Ball (eventually add weight)
-Hanging Leg Raise

Speed
I'm going to assume that you don't have access to any sort of parachute or weight sled. If you only want to train for the 100m I would say that you don't really need to run more than 400m at any time during your workout. If you run more than 400m your body will rely mainly on aerobic (with oxygen) respiration. For sprinting, you want to focus on increasing anaerobic (without oxygen) capacity. Here is one workout for 100m and 200m sprinters:
4x20m
3x30m
2x40m
1x50m
Repeat 2 more times
For rest, walk or lightly jog the same distance you just ran.

If I find anymore good workouts I'll post them up here.

Lastly, technique. There's only so much I can do without seeing a video of your form. But I have some general advice:
-Keep good posture when you run: make sure your shoulders are back, your spine is straight and your head is straight up, not bent forwards or backwards.
-Try to focus your eyes on a stationary object straight in front of you.
-Try to open up (lengthen) your stride as much as possible without feeling too weird. You don't want to be bounding from leg to leg but you do want to have a nice long stride.

Well that's all I got right now. If I find anything else I'll post it up here.

Bamm
11-11-2006, 12:26 AM
I think flexibilty might be my biggest problem I cant touch my toes and my sit and reach is like 7 or 8 My legs are extremely tight

teenathlete3030
12-05-2006, 06:46 PM
HeHe, my sit and reach is 0". Used to be negative. (Short arms, long legs and no flexability. lol)

That last post is pretty good. Another thing with form, keep the elbows bent at a 90 degree angle at all times. Don't clench your fists, though. Keep relaxed. Start off leaning forward, then as you reach top speed you'll be most likely straight up, but not leaning backwards. Relax your face muscles, no clenching teeth. Get those legs out in front of you, the most pushing comes as your legs are directly below your body and center of gravity.

Best thing is to watch slow motion videos of olympic sprinters on-line, and videotape yourself. Then you can make comparisons and critique yourself.

PGreezy
12-05-2006, 09:44 PM
Its all about your explosion. My best friend ran the 100m he was AAU national champion and State Champion in the 4x100m. You need to have a pop. As soon as u hear the gun you gotta go and go fast. Once your running you just need to hold your speed. Alot of sprinting is natural ability but you can work hard and be good at it. Im fast(4.6 - 40) but I threw the Shotput and Discus so dont know any specific sprinting workouts.

ced^_-
12-10-2006, 09:05 PM
Okay, here it goes:

To improve your 100m time you're going to want to focus on improving power, core strength and linear speed. Your muscles must be able to apply force through a full range of motion. That means that you should be relatively flexible.

Power
As far as lifting goes the best exercises you can do are:
-Cleans (both power cleans and hang cleans)
-Squats
-Deadlifts
-Lunges
-Bench Press
-Pull-Ups
-Bent-Over Rows
-Shoulder Press & Push Press

Since you use your legs to transfer most of the power generated by your core when sprinting, you want your legs to be very powerful. I would discourage you from using machines such as the leg extension and leg curl as they provide virtually no benefit to the core which is where most of your power is generated. If you like doing single joint exercises such as bicep curls and DB front/side/rear raises, they won't hurt. But they probably won't help much either.

Core Strength and Stabilization
Although all of the previous lifts work your core to some extent, I think that doing core-specific exercises is beneficial. If you don't have access to a Balance Ball/Physioball/Swiss Ball I would reccomend buying one. They increase the difficulty of most exercises by forcing your body to stabilize itself by engaging its deep abdominal muscles: your transverse abdominis and your internal obliques
-Russian Twist on Balance Ball
-Weighted Crunch on Balance Ball
-Barbell Roll-Out
-Front and Side Bridge with Feet on Balance Ball (eventually add weight)
-Hanging Leg Raise

Speed
I'm going to assume that you don't have access to any sort of parachute or weight sled. If you only want to train for the 100m I would say that you don't really need to run more than 400m at any time during your workout. If you run more than 400m your body will rely mainly on aerobic (with oxygen) respiration. For sprinting, you want to focus on increasing anaerobic (without oxygen) capacity. Here is one workout for 100m and 200m sprinters:
4x20m
3x30m
2x40m
1x50m
Repeat 2 more times
For rest, walk or lightly jog the same distance you just ran.

If I find anymore good workouts I'll post them up here.

Lastly, technique. There's only so much I can do without seeing a video of your form. But I have some general advice:
-Keep good posture when you run: make sure your shoulders are back, your spine is straight and your head is straight up, not bent forwards or backwards.
-Try to focus your eyes on a stationary object straight in front of you.
-Try to open up (lengthen) your stride as much as possible without feeling too weird. You don't want to be bounding from leg to leg but you do want to have a nice long stride.

Well that's all I got right now. If I find anything else I'll post it up here.


What he says is right but I will give more detail... In the 100meter race you have three main phases..Acceleration 0-30meter top-speed 30-60meter and deacceleration 60-100meter..Dont let no one tell you that you can hold top speed the whole race. Without going into too much detail. You should try and stay relaxed thu-out the race..Once you learn to feel when you reached top=speed this is the time to relax and maintain your speed to the end.

Ruffian
12-11-2006, 10:46 AM
The worlds best sprinters are the worlds best solely because they decelerate at a slower pace then everyone else. You need to mix endurance training with sprint training over a variety of distances in order to train your body to do this.

BUT, before we get into ANY sort of training methods you need to understand how to sprint with *proper* form. Yes, there is proper running form, and if you dont use it then all that sprint training will be a complete and total waste.

First and foremost as this is the CARDINAL rule for sprinters:

1) ALWAYS RUN ON YOUR TOES! At NO time during your sprint should any other part of your foot touch the ground, period. Dont bother buying cleats until you have mastered the form btw, you can end up doing yourself more harm then good especially given your broken ankle.

The rest are gradual and should be practiced on their own until it becomes second nature to you- These are called the sprinting "ABC's".

A- Whilst running on your toes, lift your knees as high as possible while flexing your toe up high (this comes into play later in sprint form). The angle of your knee should be approximately 90 degrees.

B- Extension. In this part you will stretch your leg as far forward as possible, start with it at a walk (you will feel like a crazy prancing pony and look like an idiot, but it is of great importance when it comes to stride length). lift your knee high, as in part A but then kick your foot forward before placing it on the ground. Once you have it mastered at a walk you can start skipping to it, it takes asecond or two to figure out the motion at a skip but you will get it.

C- But kick- Self explanitory, while jogging kick your but and do this as many times as possible within a given distance, do not care about your stride length at this point because it is not of consequence- this is to help you train for turnover.

Once you have these mastered then start doing sprint drills, you can follow the above recommended ones but personally; I am not a fan. In my experience if you do not longer distance training w/ sprint form you will tire out before you reach the 20 m mark. Although, there is a benefit to short distance training to.

Start with something that is similar to HIIT, sprinting 20m, walking 20m, sprinting 40 m, walking 40m. Continue this up to the 100m sprint and eventually beyond, once your endurance is there. however, the purpose to this is that you MUST use proper form- otherwise it is a useless excersize. Also throw in some long distance work 4-800 m sprints as you are capable of. Dont go all out but try to maintain 50-60% of your speed for the duration, while using proper form. These will tire you out but also give you enough endurance to slow your decelleration in a race.

Thirdly- dont be too concerned about racing until you are able to do a full training regimine, you will more then likely have your ars kicked. If you have a school track team, then it will be to your benefit to ask if you can work out with them, explain you are trying to learn to sprint and that you wont get in the way. But you would just appreciate their help, some will be more willing then others. If they say no at first, go train on your own for a month and go back; if you do it right they eventually wont be able to refuse you.

Good luck!

KeMiKaL
12-11-2006, 01:37 PM
I'm pretty sure Michael Johnson didn't decelerate at all when he set the 200m record haha