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Mr.Buttcheeks
02-09-2002, 02:30 PM
some of these fish steaks things that i eat along with everything else has some soybean oil, what exactly is in soybean oil is it all good fats?????whats the nutrional breakdown of it??????thanks

Mr.Buttcheeks
02-10-2002, 03:52 PM
:help:

David
02-10-2002, 04:45 PM
Mr. Buttcheeks your name cracks me up

Mr.Buttcheeks
02-10-2002, 08:29 PM
thanks man i think my name is cool, i guess nobody has a clue about the soybean oil huh

millertime
03-18-2002, 02:56 PM
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five major fatty acids in soybean oil are palmitate, stearate, oleate, linolenate, and linoleate. The fatty acids differ in the number of carbon and hydrogen atoms they contain, which causes differences in the nutritional value of each and their influence on the characteristics of food products.

Palmitate: It is made up of 16 carbon atoms and a full set of hydrogen atoms, which makes it a saturated fatty acid. Palmitate has a negative impact on human nutrition. It has desirable characteristics for making margarine and shortening.
Stearate: It is made up of 18 carbon atoms and a full set of hydrogen atoms. Stearate is a saturated fatty acid that does not have the same negative effect on human nutrition as does palmitate. It has desirable characteristics for making margarine and shortening.

Oleate: It is made up of 18 carbon atoms, two of which each lack a hydrogen atom. The absence of a full set of hydrogen atoms make it an unsaturated fatty acid. Oleate is referred to as a monounsaturate. It is desirable for human nutrition and for frying oils.

Linoleate: It is made up of 18 carbon atoms, four of which each lack a hydrogen atom. Linoleate is an unsaturated fatty acid that is referred to as a polyunsaturate. It is desirable for nutrition, but can lead to off-flavors in food products that are not hydrogenated.

Linolenate: It is made up of 18 carbon atoms, six of which each lack a hydrogen atom. Linolenate is an unsaturated fatty acid that is described as a polyunsaturate. It is desirable for nutrition, but it is the fatty acid most responsible for the off-flavors in food products that are not hydrogenated.

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The_Chicken_Daddy
03-18-2002, 03:30 PM
Millertime, if you read my article then you'd be able to explain all that in laymans terms ;)

Buttcheeks: Soybean is a source of Linoleic and Linolenic. In other words good fats (omega 3 and omega 6).

Mr.Buttcheeks
03-18-2002, 07:18 PM
wow i posted this when i first came to wannabebig lol. thanks for the excellent info i finally got a straight answer thanks!!!!!!!