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mickyjune26
11-27-2006, 09:33 PM
Does cooking extra virgin olive oil create trans-fats or make it bad for you in any fashion?

From what I understand, extra virgin olive oil becomes regular (more bad for you) olive oil when it is "processed" and "refined".

Thoughts?

Holto
11-27-2006, 09:56 PM
To actually create trans you would need to inject hydrogen gas and get the oil to around 1400 degrees.

That said you shouldn't heat olive oil over 315 degrees and this makes it very difficult to use for cooking.

Generally speaking you should cook with solid fats.

mickyjune26
11-30-2006, 09:09 PM
My stovetop goes to 1450, i think. It runs on hydrogen gas.

Why shouldn't a person heat olive oil above 315?

Focused70
11-30-2006, 09:29 PM
That said you shouldn't heat olive oil over 315 degrees and this makes it very difficult to use for cooking.

Not true. Olive oil grade "olive oil" has a higher smoking point (410 F) than virgin olive oil or extra-virgin olive oil, which consequently makes it a superior oil for most high-heat cooking techniques (i.e., sauteing, stir-frying, deep-frying). You can use VOO or EVOO for the same methods; the only substantive difference would be a slight loss of flavor the higher the grade of oil.

I've never heard of the "no 315 rule", and I use olive oil quite a bit.

Beast
11-30-2006, 09:47 PM
I've never heard of the "no 315 rule", and I use olive oil quite a bit.
It stems from what you just explained. Virgin olive oils have low melting points, so you don't want to really fry with them because they basically burn right off of the pan.

Focused70
12-01-2006, 08:21 AM
It stems from what you just explained. Virgin olive oils have low melting points, so you don't want to really fry with them because they basically burn right off of the pan.

But...it's not true.

You can use pure olive oil (aka "olive oil), virgin or extra-virgin olive oil for high heat cooking methods. The only difference will be a loss of flavor.

I think you guys need to read this (http://www.oliveoilsource.com/olive_oil_smoke_point.htm) and this (http://www.oliveoilsource.com/cooking_olive_oil.htm).

RedSpikeyThing
12-01-2006, 09:18 AM
so you don't want to really fry with them because they basically burn right off of the pan.

Literally? Because I've cooked with it before and stayed right there...

OP, thanks for bringing this up - I was wondering myself.

RedSpikeyThing
12-01-2006, 09:22 AM
Also, since a lot of an oil's flavour is lost in frying, what is a good cheap oil to fry with?

Focused70
12-01-2006, 10:00 AM
Well, you could use pure olive oil and then top it off with EVOO towards the end.

Peanut oil is pretty good. Canola oil is another. You should experiment to see what you like.

Beast
12-01-2006, 02:07 PM
I think you guys need to read this (http://www.oliveoilsource.com/olive_oil_smoke_point.htm) and this (http://www.oliveoilsource.com/cooking_olive_oil.htm).
Ah, I was referring to this: "Olive oil has a high smoke point, 410 degrees F".

So it doesn't degrade it, but it starts smoking... I guess I thought the smoking meant that it was burning away, hehe.

Thanks for the clarification.

ddegroff
12-01-2006, 02:55 PM
But...it's not true.

You can use pure olive oil (aka "olive oil), virgin or extra-virgin olive oil for high heat cooking methods. The only difference will be a loss of flavor.

I think you guys need to read this (http://www.oliveoilsource.com/olive_oil_smoke_point.htm) and this (http://www.oliveoilsource.com/cooking_olive_oil.htm).

Cleared that up, thanks:hello: .

Holto
12-01-2006, 05:50 PM
Heating something beyond it's smoking point changes it's chemical composition. Generally into something less healthy.

Focused70
12-01-2006, 07:38 PM
Perhaps, but that's not what was asked.

TTT
12-01-2006, 08:51 PM
Is that really relevant? By frying a steak, (or vegetables, depending how you cook them), you're pretty much burning the outside anyway (and definitely changing the inside).

I've also heard that olive oil or solid fats (butter, lard etc.) are the best to cook with. Apparently they form the least free radicals when you heat them to frying pan temperatures. Also, the same person said that margarine should be avoided for frying, because it forms a lot.

Holto
12-02-2006, 04:35 PM
Perhaps, but that's not what was asked.

erh?


Does cooking extra virgin olive oil create trans-fats or make it bad for you in any fashion?

Yes.

Heating something beyond it's smoking point is not healthy.

mickyjune26
12-03-2006, 09:07 AM
Yeah - definately don't like the taste when i accidentally preheat my oil to the smoking point.

So conclusion that I'm drawing is that as long as we stay below the smoke point, the healthy fatty acids will still be in place, right?

Holto
12-03-2006, 12:19 PM
Yeah - definately don't like the taste when i accidentally preheat my oil to the smoking point.

So conclusion that I'm drawing is that as long as we stay below the smoke point, the healthy fatty acids will still be in place, right?

Correct.

Focused70
12-03-2006, 01:48 PM
Correct.

You quoted a smoke point of 315 for olive oil, which is as has been pointed out, not true.

Most people who cook with OO stay well below 410 F. I don't think the OP has much to worry about as per this link (http://www.oliveoilsource.com/cooking_olive_oil.htm).

Feel free to continue.

Holto
12-03-2006, 01:57 PM
You quoted a smoke point of 315 for olive oil, which is as has been pointed out, not true.

Most people who cook with OO stay well below 410 F. I don't think the OP has much to worry about.

I quote what I read.

Do you have a link?

Focused70
12-03-2006, 02:01 PM
See above.

Focused70
12-03-2006, 02:06 PM
Once more with feeling:



t stems from what you just explained. Virgin olive oils have low melting points, so you don't want to really fry with them because they basically burn right off of the pan.

But...it's not true.

You can use pure olive oil (aka "olive oil), virgin or extra-virgin olive oil for high heat cooking methods. The only difference will be a loss of flavor.

I think you guys need to read this (http://www.oliveoilsource.com/olive_oil_smoke_point.htm) and this (http://www.oliveoilsource.com/cooking_olive_oil.htm).

Max Thunder
12-03-2006, 02:13 PM
Lard and other naturally hard fats > macadamia oil > olive oil > other vegetable oils > margarine crap.

Olive oil and above are perfectly fine for cooking, but my preference goes for lard or bacon fat for steak, and duck fat for chicken.

Focused70
12-03-2006, 02:24 PM
Don't forget schmaltz.

Without schmaltz, there would be no matzoh balls or chopped liver.

Biggs
12-03-2006, 02:52 PM
Saturated fats are less susceptible to heat damage. Olive oil contains mostly monounsaturated fats, so therefore not the best choice for cooking. Any animal fat (butter, lard, ect.) or coconut oil is best for cooking.

Holto
12-03-2006, 04:01 PM
Once more with feeling:

Do you have anything scientific or from a source that is not commissioned with promoting the sale of olive oil?

dtshen
12-03-2006, 04:29 PM
can anyone guess as to how hot im cooking with if i turn the stove on 3/4 of the way? as in 3/4 of the knob goes to full.

also, how healthy is sesame oil

Focused70
12-03-2006, 04:53 PM
Do you have anything scientific or from a source that is not commissioned with promoting the sale of olive oil?
Click (http://www.cookingforengineers.com/article.php?id=50&title=Smoke+Points+of+Various+Fats). Or here (http://food.oregonstate.edu/faq/fat/fat10.html).

Or here (http://www.cookingforengineers.com/article.php?id=40&title=Saturated+Fats%2C+Cholesterol%2C+and+Heart+Disease), which goes into extreme detail about the process of partial hydrogenation. Or here (http://healthgate.partners.org/browsing/LearningCenter.asp?fileName=13977.xml&title=Demystifying%20Oil).

I don't know where you're getting your information but 315 F is not it.

Holto
12-03-2006, 05:55 PM
I don't know where you're getting your information but 315 F is not it.

Cool thanks.

I get alot of my info from Alive and Vitality magazine and anything that Sam Graci writes.

In your first link it shows the smoking point of EVO @ 320. So I'm off by 5 degrees.

I don't know if I've ever seen olive oil that wasn't EVO in a grocery store. Have to look for it next time.

Honestly though, thanks, your info has officially ressurrected a killer wing recipe of mine.

Focused70
12-03-2006, 06:00 PM
My point is that smoke point varies according to how much impurities are present in the oil. This is why you'll see lots of variables from as low as 280 F to as high as 420 F for extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO). When you buy EVOO, VOO or OO in the supermarket, they all say EVOO, VOO or OO but they don't tell you to what degree the oil has been refined.

350 to roughly 410 F is the "safe zone" with respect to EVOO, higher for more refined OO. Obviously the higher the smoke point, the less flavorful the oil will be. Then again, you may not necessarily be concerned with that aesthetic.

It shows EVOO as 320 F but further down the chart you'll see "High quality (low acidity) EVOO" as having a smoke point of 405 F. Not all extra-virgin olive oils are created equal.