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madtaper
11-28-2006, 08:32 AM
I am curious about athletes performing deadlifts, either traditional, sumo, or both. I know that the olympic lifts and the bench and squat are popular with strength coaches, but I have not seen nor heard about athletes performing deadlifts. I think deadlifts are apropriate for sport. Any thoughts on this?

ericg
11-28-2006, 08:36 AM
Well deads are part of the motion of the olympic lifts, just like push presses and front squats, so yeah I think it would be in an athletes list of exercises that they would perform.

Anthony
11-28-2006, 08:37 AM
The deadlift starts both olympic lifts.

Anthony
11-28-2006, 08:37 AM
Eric beat me to it. :D

Isaac Wilkins
11-28-2006, 10:11 AM
A lot of coaches like deadlifts for athletes, myself included. There really aren't a lot of exercises that are better for developing whole body strength and especially posterior chain strength.

Many coaches use a lot of Romanian Deadlifts (and variations) and trap bar deadlifts with their athletes. I use those lifts as well as conventional deadlifts or snatch-grip deadlifts.

Sensei
11-28-2006, 11:47 AM
I don't necessarily agree, but here's one coaches approach: http://www.dragondoor.com/articler/mode3/269/

ericg
11-28-2006, 12:00 PM
Interesting article thanks Sensei

Anthony
11-28-2006, 12:04 PM
I don't necessarily agree, but here's one coaches approach: http://www.dragondoor.com/articler/mode3/269/

I enjoyed the article, thanks!

MixmasterNash
11-28-2006, 12:44 PM
There's a big reason that olympic lifts are increasingly popular for athletes... with a proper setup, ie bumpers, there is no negative movement. This really reduces the DOMS and recovery time while still building strength. Same with sled pulls, and some other GPP work.

Deadlifts are not quite so useful in this regard. They are obviously excellent for basic strength and muscle building, which are top off season priorities, but it seems like they're not the best for recovery with a lot of other activity.

Anthony
11-28-2006, 12:46 PM
Why couldn't you drop the deadlift the same way you'd drop a clean?

MixmasterNash
11-28-2006, 12:58 PM
Why couldn't you drop the deadlift the same way you'd drop a clean?

You could. No one does. (Not many people do...)

Plus the olympic lifts are more explosive, which has slightly better carry over to force production during sports.

SW
11-28-2006, 01:06 PM
Good article sensei.

ArchAngel777
11-28-2006, 02:26 PM
There's a big reason that olympic lifts are increasingly popular for athletes... with a proper setup, ie bumpers, there is no negative movement. This really reduces the DOMS and recovery time while still building strength. Same with sled pulls, and some other GPP work.

Deadlifts are not quite so useful in this regard. They are obviously excellent for basic strength and muscle building, which are top off season priorities, but it seems like they're not the best for recovery with a lot of other activity.


At my gym deadlifts are dropped the moment they are locked out. It actually bothers me and creates a lot of ruccus. But, I guess it doesn't bother me that much, because I still lift in the power room.

Chris Leroux over at www.weightliftingexchange.com makes some good points about deadlifts and the sport of weightlifting. He argues that they really do not benefit the clean and are not needed at all to suppliment the sport of weightlifting. He argues front squats, because you have to recover from the clean. Chris is a pretty smart guy when it comes to the sport of weightlifting. Great information and is a pretty good lifter himself, though appears to be quite anal of a person.

beatlesfreak
11-30-2006, 08:08 PM
I don't necessarily agree, but here's one coaches approach: http://www.dragondoor.com/articler/mode3/269/

Just curious, sensei.

Do you disagree with the theoretical aspect of this article---that deads are as effective as squats for increasing sprint speed, or the practical part of the article--the training regimine that requires deads three times per week on consecutive days? Or something else entirely?

I think lots of us here would appreciate an opinion from a professional like yourself, especially me, since I'm currently acting as strength coach to a couple of local high school aged kids who are, among other things, trying to increase their sprint speed in preparation for various upcoming school athletic events.