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View Full Version : What if your calories are the same, but you change your diet?



ViciousBish
12-20-2006, 12:08 PM
What if you went from eating bad fatty food, soda, beer at 3,000 calories... to eating really healthy, lots of fruits vegetables, tons of protein at 3,000 calories. What would that do to a theoretic guy who weights 250 lbs?

EvanH
12-20-2006, 12:16 PM
He wouldn't die of morbid obesity or diabetes. Overall he'd be a lot healthier.

ddegroff
12-20-2006, 01:11 PM
He'd be healthier.

In theory his weight shouldn't change if he was already maintaining. Ofcourse there are some that believe otherwise.

stepto180
12-20-2006, 01:32 PM
if he is also lifting I believe his body would transform maybe not loose weight but it would start to loose bodyfat and look leaner

someone I know did something similar and in 3 months had only lost 3 lbs but countless inches and looks completly different

TopQuark1028
12-20-2006, 03:15 PM
I can say from personal experience.
Being a physicist and understanding conservation of energy quite well I assumed it didn't really matter so when I 1st constructed my diet the only factor I took into account was calories. I did this for about 1 month and didn't really see to much of a strength gain and I only lost about 1lb. (I ate about 1900 calories a day which I later found out was to low)

I then switched (about 2 months ago) to also monitoring macronutrients and eating a low carb diet on top of a slightly higher caloric restriction of 2300 a day.

Since I've done this my strength gains have been continuous and rapid and I've also dropped 5 lbs.

My Explanation is the following:
Your metabolic rate is highly correlated to the macronutrient content of your diet. Which explains the weight loss

The amount of protein you eat definitely increases strength gains. (duh)

Holto
12-20-2006, 09:55 PM
Your metabolic rate is highly correlated to the macronutrient content of your diet.

If you get a chance I'm curious as to what your reasoning here is.

NewTriathlete
12-20-2006, 10:09 PM
This is a good article on the subject matter

http://www.johnberardi.com/articles/nutrition/new_view.htm

TopQuark1028
12-21-2006, 10:29 AM
If you get a chance I'm curious as to what your reasoning here is.

sure it's quite simple actually:
In the time I spent (~1.5 months) of not considering macronutrient content at all, ONLY daily caloric intake I lost only 1 lb.

I then switched to eating the same number of calories (maybe 5% more on average actually) but paying very close attn to macronutient content I lost 5 lbs in 2 months.

that means I LOST 73% more weight without changing ANYTHING in my routine/caloric intake. The only change was macronutrient content.

How can I justify this logically? Well it means I must of burned more energy somewhere, and being that my activity level was the exact same it had to be correlated to regular metabolic rate.

Hence my conclusion - Macronutrient content is highly correlated to metabolic rate.

All this information can be seen in my fitday which I maintain very accurately. Link is here: http://www.fitday.com/WebFit/PublicJournals.html?Owner=blakeja

Holto
12-21-2006, 08:29 PM
Were you testing your bodyfat?

Were you lifting weights?

Chris686
12-21-2006, 10:37 PM
if he is also lifting I believe his body would transform maybe not loose weight but it would start to loose bodyfat and look leaner

Lose*

Yes... I'm anal about that.



In theory his weight shouldn't change if he was already maintaining. Ofcourse there are some that believe otherwise.

I suppose this reasoning is the macronutrients affecting metabolic rate argument?
TopQuark raises an interesting point. Is anyone aware of a larger study? It's hard to base a conclusion on a single case.
But this does seem like a hard thing to test. There are so many variables to take into consideration.

Holto
12-22-2006, 09:06 PM
Lose*

Yes... I'm anal about that.



I suppose this reasoning is the macronutrients affecting metabolic rate argument?
TopQuark raises an interesting point. Is anyone aware of a larger study? It's hard to base a conclusion on a single case.
But this does seem like a hard thing to test. There are so many variables to take into consideration.

Especially when we don't know the body composition of the subject.

Gaining LBM greatly increases maintenance cals.

deeder
12-22-2006, 11:16 PM
Of course you'd lose weight. But it would only be water weight. Garbage diets generally contain lots of sodium and you retain water really easily. Cutting carbs also helps drop water weight.

If you're asking if they'd lose fat... The answer is probably not. It takes more than a clean diet to lose fat. If you're still above your maintenance calories it won't matter.