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View Full Version : Why Low Calorie Diets Suck



Anthony
01-02-2007, 11:14 AM
http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=1392804

Great read!

ericg
01-02-2007, 12:22 PM
Good read and a nice pic too!!

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
01-02-2007, 12:29 PM
Hehe...funny article. :) Good read.

Unholy
01-02-2007, 12:31 PM
Good read for sure

Unreal
01-02-2007, 01:48 PM
I like Tony's writing. Good article.

deeder
01-02-2007, 03:02 PM
Good article and some pretty funny stuff in there!

Optimum08
01-02-2007, 04:03 PM
great read. t-nation has some good stuff.

jft9120
01-02-2007, 09:28 PM
nice article. helped alot

SpecialK
01-02-2007, 10:48 PM
Good article, although there probably isn't much new in there for the typical WBB'er. On the other hand, it's a shame that the main group of people that article seems to target, i.e., people trying to get in shape but without a good plan, will probably never visit t-nation on their own.

galileo
01-03-2007, 12:08 AM
Yep. Not so sure what the target audience is on that one.

getfit
01-03-2007, 04:20 AM
Great read

Anthony
01-03-2007, 06:27 AM
Yep. Not so sure what the target audience is on that one.

Males who weigh more than 100 pounds and think it's a good idea to eat 1200 calories a day because they think abs will bring world peace.

Clifford Gillmore
01-03-2007, 06:36 AM
Males who weigh more than 100 pounds and think it's a good idea to eat 1200 calories a day because they think abs will bring world peace.

Pffft. Long lengs do that stupid.

galileo
01-03-2007, 09:04 AM
Males who weigh more than 100 pounds and think it's a good idea to eat 1200 calories a day because they think abs will bring world peace.

Abs do bring world peace. Also, steroids and pubmed makes everyone a genius.

Unreal
01-03-2007, 09:10 AM
ABS can help make world peace. If it prevents you from rear ending someone, then that is one less person pissed off in the world making it a better place. I'm glad both my cars have ABS.

galileo
01-03-2007, 09:13 AM
These idiots from t-nation think planned low calorie diets are useful. ****ing morons.

http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=546491

Then some idiots at...um, "Wanna be" something. Big? Maybe...I dunno. They are proudly displaying results of one of these dangerous diets that don't work (http://www.atlargenutrition.com/mike_symons.php).

Also, fyi, the article has one section about calories being too low and it's not in the context of a structure low-calorie diet. Many overweight people have learned how to eat through PSMF style diet, UD2 has helped countless people push through the 12% barrier, and now with t-mag diets like the V-Diet, you're going to see even more people utilizing this method for rapid results. With proper planning and enough knowledge there's nothing wrong with low calorie diets. I'm going to write a funny article called "Why HIIT sucks" and include such quips as:

"Undershirts are expensive these days and with HIIT, I need to buy new ones twice as much (1)! Plus, when I'm done I feel like **** for about 30 minutes and everyone knows that if you feel bad while dieting, it's counterproductive (2).



1. Walmart. Undershirts. <http://www.walmart.com>
2. Everyone. Common knowledge.


About the author:
galileo, CSA (Certified Smart Ass), BS/MBA (i.e.,no real credentials)"

Vapour Trails
01-03-2007, 10:54 AM
I agree with Galileo....

That article is pretty much a cut and paste of most of Lyle McDonalds writing/work, except he doesn't mention well excuted very low calorie diets give good results. His quotes of Dan's are not in reference to very low calorie diets, just diets in general.

Anthony
01-04-2007, 10:20 AM
I'm supposed to agree with everything TN/WBB/ALN posts just because I enjoyed one article? Hardly.

Crash diets suck. Sure, there are examples of people going from fat to not-quite-as-fat, but the person who goes from fat to look-at-my-abs lean via a crash diet is rare to non-existent. And if they do exist, they don't exist for long because they didn't learn any habits and they'll eventually revert to their old ways, doomed to repeat the crash diet again and again. Not to mention performance drawbacks.

I've learned a lot from reading about UD2, PSMF, and similar. Would I ever use it or recommend someone to use it? No. Why? Because there are better long term solutions. And by better I mean better body composition, strength, overall performance, and longevity.

(Un)Fortunately this community gives us the opportunity to witness yoyo dieters on a daily basis. Lots of short term success by many members, but look at the long term success over the span of 2, 3, or 5 years. Most, if not all, crash dieters/quick fix followers have similar body composition, strength, and performance compared to when they started. Why? Because they never change their habits.

ArchAngel777
01-04-2007, 12:03 PM
I'm supposed to agree with everything TN/WBB/ALN posts just because I enjoyed one article? Hardly.

Crash diets suck. Sure, there are examples of people going from fat to not-quite-as-fat, but the person who goes from fat to look-at-my-abs lean via a crash diet is rare to non-existent. And if they do exist, they don't exist for long because they didn't learn any habits and they'll eventually revert to their old ways, doomed to repeat the crash diet again and again. Not to mention performance drawbacks.

I've learned a lot from reading about UD2, PSMF, and similar. Would I ever use it or recommend someone to use it? No. Why? Because there are better long term solutions. And by better I mean better body composition, strength, overall performance, and longevity.

(Un)Fortunately this community gives us the opportunity to witness yoyo dieters on a daily basis. Lots of short term success by many members, but look at the long term success over the span of 2, 3, or 5 years. Most, if not all, crash dieters/quick fix followers have similar body composition, strength, and performance compared to when they started. Why? Because they never change their habits.


To some extent, I do agree with you. But there is quite a bit I dissagree with. As far as myself, I learned good eating habits before I did PSMF. The thing is, I can eat healthy and adjust portions as needed. You seem to imply that if one lowers his portions then he must be eating something unhealthy. Whether you actually think this or not, I have no idea. But if some is to keep their protein at 1g per pound of lbm and their fats .3 - .5 of their lbm, the rest is just details. Some days you might adjust your carbs, somedays you might not. Hell, people do this whether they try to or not. You cannot eat the same food with the same serving size day in and day out, you would go nuts and people do. I am willing to be there are days where you just let your body naturally decide, at least, I hope you do. Stuffing yourself when you ae sick isn't healthy in my opinion. I don't care if it is fish oils, or a crapload of protein. There are circumstances where a diet needs to be flexible.

Again, let me restate. Just because someone does PSMF, or UD 2.0 or any other form of a diet to lose weight does not mandate that their diets sucked before that, it just doesn't. Sometimes people want to speed up the process, sometimes they don't. Sometimes people want a break, yada yada yada... But again, I don't like it that you seem to think anyone who does PSMF or UD2.0 or any other diet is a "yoyo" that doesn't have good eating habits, because that isn't true.

Anthony
01-04-2007, 12:18 PM
You seem to imply that if one lowers his portions then he must be eating something unhealthy. Whether you actually think this or not, I have no idea.
I made no mention of food choices or ratios, so I'm not sure where you got this idea. In my opinion, any diet not designed for long term success is a diet that should be ignored. That doesn't mean you need to eat the same food, the same amount, or the same ratios of macronutrients every day or every month or every year. It means you develop PROPER habits that last a lifetime. Drinking 6-8 protein shakes and popping some fish oil capsules is not even close to being a long term solution. Not to mention the results in body composition are easily reproduced with a more sensible approach WITHOUT the reduction in strength or performance. It might take longer, but patience is a good thing.


But again, I don't like it that you seem to think anyone who does PSMF or UD2.0 or any other diet is a "yoyo" that doesn't have good eating habits, because that isn't true.
I never said everyone who uses those diets are "yoyos" ... I used "yoyo" as a term to describe how people flucuate from fat to not-so-fat and then back to fat ... like a yoyo.

http://www.gasolinealleyantiques.com/cartoon/images/Hanna/ftp-huck-yoyo.JPG

ArchAngel777
01-04-2007, 12:26 PM
I made no mention of food choices or ratios, so I'm not sure where you got this idea. In my opinion, any diet not designed for long term success is a diet that should be ignored. That doesn't mean you need to eat the same food, the same amount, or the same ratios of macronutrients every day or every month or every year. It means you develop PROPER habits that last a lifetime. Drinking 6-8 protein shakes and popping some fish oil capsules is not even close to being a long term solution. Not to mention the results in body composition are easily reproduced with a more sensible approach WITHOUT the reduction in strength or performance. It might take longer, but patience is a good thing.


I never said everyone who uses those diets are "yoyos" ... I used "yoyo" as a term to describe how people flucuate from fat to not-so-fat and then back to fat ... like a yoyo.

http://www.gasolinealleyantiques.com/cartoon/images/Hanna/ftp-huck-yoyo.JPG

I guess that is where I dissagree. Perhaps the way you eat and many others allows you to acheive optimal results. Not everyone is going to respond the same way that you do to a certain diet. I think it is a good idea to figure out how your body responds to certain situations. I have a friend who is absolutely shredded and he doesn't have to do anything. I suppose for him, maybe a 'sensible diet' works (whatever sensible means to you). Who knows... For someone like me, I am willing to try several different diets to see how my body responds, strength, physique, weight, etc...

As far as for reading into what you post, I didn't read into that post above, but what you write all over these boards. Your advice is a good, sound, and will work for many people, no doubts there. I don't doubt that you have a great aproach. But where I differ is that I do not believe the same diet works for everyone. I don't believe that. I think each should be tailored to the individual.

Anthony
01-04-2007, 12:36 PM
Different people have different levels of nutrient partitioning ... some good, some bad. We all have a friend who is huge and lean without knowing a lick about training or eating. Good genes, so he has more leeway in what he does.

For the rest of us, we need to manipulate our training and diet help our body's ability to partition the food we eat. We want more of it to be used for strength and growth and less of it to be stored as fat. UD2 goes into detail about this.

As for "specific" diets ... I don't think I've ever told anyone to eat specific foods or follow a specific plan. If anything, I've been overly general. There are minimums for fat/protein and certain guidelines that everyone should follow (barring disease), but outside of that, what and when you choose to eat is totally up to individual tastes.

The bottom line is that we are more similar than different and if you look at what the majority of successful people do, you'll notice a common theme. That's what I try to promote.

ArchAngel777
01-04-2007, 12:43 PM
Different people have different levels of nutrient partitioning ... some good, some bad. We all have a friend who is huge and lean without knowing a lick about training or eating. Good genes, so he has more leeway in what he does.

For the rest of us, we need to manipulate our training and diet help our body's ability to partition the food we eat. We want more of it to be used for strength and growth and less of it to be stored as fat. UD2 goes into detail about this.

As for "specific" diets ... I don't think I've ever told anyone to eat specific foods or follow a specific plan. If anything, I've been overly general. There are minimums for fat/protein and certain guidelines that everyone should follow (barring disease), but outside of that, what and when you choose to eat is totally up to individual tastes.

The bottom line is that we are more similar than different and if you look at what the majority of successful people do, you'll notice a common theme. That's what I try to promote.

The only common theme I have been able to find is that they are all consistant. I think consistancy is the key. That means, eat healthy consistantly, workout consistantly... That is what I see most have in common.

Anthony
01-04-2007, 01:01 PM
The only common theme I have been able to find is that they are all consistant. I think consistancy is the key. That means, eat healthy consistantly, workout consistantly... That is what I see most have in common.

Absolutely. Using a piss poor routine/eating plan consistently is 1000x more effective than the perfect plan that is never used.

But the common themes can be broken down even more:

Workout consistently with compound barbell movements, high intensity (% of 1RM or MHR), and variation.

Eat healthy meals consistently with meat, veggies/fruits, and nuts/seeds.

Practise these principles until they become habits. By definition a habit is an acquired behavior pattern regularly followed until it has become almost involuntary. Most people don't have good habits, they have short term plans to resist their habits. Either way, make those habits and follow them 90% of the time and you're golden. I don't care what special alien powers you have to defy physics or biology. :p

Is it the only way? Of course not. Is it the best way? Obviously I think so or I wouldn't be recommending it. ;)