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View Full Version : Of interest? Recent literature on supplement timing



Crawf
01-14-2007, 06:44 AM
Hey folks,

I came across this paper, and thought it may be of interest. The journal isn't great, but most autralian sports science groups are quite good. No-one else seems to have tested these questions so directly. If anyone wants a full PDF i can private message it.....

Crawf

: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 Nov;38(11):1918-25. Links

Effects of supplement timing and resistance exercise on skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

Cribb PJ, Hayes A.
Exercise Metabolism Unit, Center for Ageing, Rehabilitation, Exercise and Sport; and the School of Biomedical Sciences, Victoria University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

PURPOSE: Some studies report greater muscle hypertrophy during resistance exercise (RE) training from supplement timing (i.e., the strategic consumption of protein and carbohydrate before and/or after each workout). However, no studies have examined whether this strategy provides greater muscle hypertrophy or strength development compared with supplementation at other times during the day. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of supplement timing compared with supplementation in the hours not close to the workout on muscle-fiber hypertrophy, strength, and body composition during a 10-wk RE program. METHODS: In a single-blind, randomized protocol, resistance-trained males were matched for strength and placed into one of two groups; the PRE-POST group consumed a supplement (1 g x kg(-1) body weight) containing protein/creatine/glucose immediately before and after RE. The MOR-EVE group consumed the same dose of the same supplement in the morning and late evening. All assessments were completed the week before and after 10 wk of structured, supervised RE training. Assessments included strength (1RM, three exercises), body composition (DEXA), and vastus lateralis muscle biopsies for determination of muscle fiber type (I, IIa, IIx), cross-sectional area (CSA), contractile protein, creatine (Cr), and glycogen content. RESULTS: PRE-POST demonstrated a greater (P < 0.05) increase in lean body mass and 1RM strength in two of three assessments. The changes in body composition were supported by a greater (P < 0.05) increase in CSA of the type II fibers and contractile protein content. PRE-POST supplementation also resulted in higher muscle Cr and glycogen values after the training program (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Supplement timing represents a simple but effective strategy that enhances the adaptations desired from RE-training.

RedSpikeyThing
01-14-2007, 08:52 AM
Cool. Is that on pubmed?

Crawf
01-14-2007, 10:13 AM
Yup.

Fredd
01-14-2007, 10:31 AM
nice article.

Holto
01-14-2007, 10:46 AM
Sorry if this sounds snobbish but I don't see anything ground breaking here. The MOR-EVE didn't take anything pre or post. We all know this is not a great strategy.

To test timing I would like to see the same pre & post protocol and the remaining supplements taken in equal quantities but at different times.

ddegroff
01-14-2007, 01:40 PM
Yeah nothing we didn't already know. It's cool to see the research though.

So Holto, when are you going to start researching? You have all of these great ideas that would really produce some new ideas. And/or confirm some already know theories.

Holto
01-14-2007, 02:28 PM
Yeah nothing we didn't already know. It's cool to see the research though.

So Holto, when are you going to start researching? You have all of these great ideas that would really produce some new ideas. And/or confirm some already know theories.

As soon as I get your blank cheque in the mail. :nod:

Crawf
01-15-2007, 02:53 AM
Sorry if this sounds snobbish but I don't see anything ground breaking here. The MOR-EVE didn't take anything pre or post. We all know this is not a great strategy.

To test timing I would like to see the same pre & post protocol and the remaining supplements taken in equal quantities but at different times.

You mean that the supplements they used were too far removed from the time of training?

Holto
01-15-2007, 12:26 PM
You mean that the supplements they used were too far removed from the time of training?

Exactly.

We all know it's important to have protein and carbs targeted around training. I think nearly 100% of the members here could have predicted the results of this study.

We have studies on meal frequency that show it doesn't effect weight loss. If similar studies used RT and quantified LBM then it might tell us something about timing.

djreef
01-15-2007, 03:53 PM
Holto - did you get the PDF of the study? Were the subjects fed prior to training - I mean with real food in measureable quantities, and post training? Not much of this is mentioned in the abstract. Screw it, Crawf can you PM me the full study. Thanx.

DJ

Holto
01-15-2007, 04:51 PM
Found this with: scholar.Google.com

http://www.acsm-msse.org/pt/re/msse/abstract.00005768-200611000-00006.htm;jsessionid=FsTG7N3zDfTgmTK6fQH2TXtGNGqRmypvDRCN3HTGQGLgTNm9wzvl!2118075020!-949856145!8091!-1

You have to log in but I had a quick look and it *might* be free.

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
01-15-2007, 05:04 PM
Found this with: scholar.Google.com

http://www.acsm-msse.org/pt/re/msse/abstract.00005768-200611000-00006.htm;jsessionid=FsTG7N3zDfTgmTK6fQH2TXtGNGqRmypvDRCN3HTGQGLgTNm9wzvl!2118075020!-949856145!8091!-1

You have to log in but I had a quick look and it *might* be free.It's not free.

ddegroff
01-15-2007, 10:16 PM
As soon as I get your blank cheque in the mail. :nod:

LOL, I'll work on that one :thumbup:.