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View Full Version : HIIT.. in the water?



BFGUITAR
01-19-2007, 09:57 AM
I was a cross country runner back a little while, but im also a swimmer. I enjoy it alot more than running (especially when its cold out). Is it possible to do HIIT in the water?

Guido
01-19-2007, 10:11 AM
I wouldn't see why not. I'd think sets of 50yd or meter sprints would be an ideal, low impact, full body exercise to promote fat loss and maintain muscle mass.

ancom41
01-19-2007, 12:22 PM
Sure you can, but beware... your caloric expenditure is gonna be much greater.

If your goal is HIIT, I would definitely add resistance to your training. Here are some good examples:

10x25 partner cord-tug (tug-a-war) @ 0:45.00
10x50 w/ drag suit @ 0:35.00
6x100 w/ drag suit @ 1:10.00
10x25 w/ stretch cords @ 0:25.00

RedSpikeyThing
01-19-2007, 12:38 PM
If your goal is HIIT, I would definitely add resistance to your training.

Why would you add resistance? I don't see why you couldn't do sprints, much like on land.

On a side note, I want to start doing HIIT with ice skating. I just need to find a place that will let me go balls out...

ancom41
01-19-2007, 12:47 PM
IMO, I think he would see better results, especially with preventing muscle loss. With water training you are basically using negative weight. Pulling your body weight through the water isn't the same as doing a sprint on land. Most of the effects from swimming are from the severe oxygen dep. Adding resistance just adds intensity. Plus, I'm a firm believer in stretch cords for water training.. I've seen some awesome results.

HIIT with Ice Skating sounds INCREDIBLE. lol.. dont they have those speed skating rinks? I've watched specials on those guys training on intervals.. sounds like a fun alternative.

BFGUITAR
01-19-2007, 02:58 PM
Do I really need stetch cords or stuff like that?
What would be an ideal HIIT workout in the water (keeping in mind that there will be alot more energy expendeture)

stepto180
01-19-2007, 03:04 PM
i dont think using stretch cords is nesacarry at all
I dont know how experienced of a swimmer you are but I personally would do
25 sprint 25 easy hopeing for 15/30 sec respectively
but if you are inseason and in shape maybe something like 50 sprint 50 easy30/60 or even 50sprint 25 easy 30/30

BFGUITAR
01-19-2007, 03:07 PM
Well I never swam in a competition. Im a lifegaurd/swim instructor and I know my strokes as well as how to move in the water effectively.

BFGUITAR
01-19-2007, 03:15 PM
Im thinking... for the fast bursts I could do front crawl/freestyle and the rest period I could do backcrawl.

As im new at this, Ill ease into it slowly.

Guido
01-19-2007, 03:24 PM
I would do an easy 200 to warm up followed by some interval sets of 50s followed by an easy cooldown. I would probably try to swim no more than 1,000 yards total. You should be able to accomplish that in less than 30 minutes or even 20 minutes if you are a strong swimmer.

BFGUITAR
01-19-2007, 03:29 PM
lol yards mean nothing to me ya crazy Americans :P
Could I do 1 fast lap followed by 2 rest laps for 30 min? At the moment im quite out of shape (heart wise) as all ive been doing is lifting rather than running.

Its not HIIT exactly, but I think its a good start.

Guido
01-19-2007, 03:32 PM
lol yards mean nothing to me ya crazy Americans :P
Could I do 1 fast lap followed by 2 rest laps for 30 min? At the moment im quite out of shape (heart wise) as all ive been doing is lifting rather than running.

Its not HIIT exactly, but I think its a good start.Exchange yards for meters. They are almost the same. 1,000 meters =/= 1,100 yards.

Hockey66
01-19-2007, 04:18 PM
HIIT with Ice Skating sounds INCREDIBLE. lol.. dont they have those speed skating rinks? I've watched specials on those guys training on intervals.. sounds like a fun alternative.

HA! It sounds incredible, but it's damn near torture. I've seen many kids puke during practice from being skated (it's always HIIT in hockey, we never do any long distance skating)

BFGUITAR
01-19-2007, 05:00 PM
Makes sense, I dont know many people who would enjoy skating circles for hours. Id like some input from built, considering its her article which explained to me what HIIT was and how I cant wait to try :D

hiitfreak
04-11-2007, 08:03 PM
I wrote an article on this at my website hiitsource.com but I can't post links yet! :o

BFGUITAR
04-11-2007, 08:24 PM
Well find a way :P

Sensei
04-11-2007, 08:53 PM
lol yards mean nothing to me ya crazy Americans :P
Could I do 1 fast lap followed by 2 rest laps for 30 min? At the moment im quite out of shape (heart wise) as all ive been doing is lifting rather than running.

Its not HIIT exactly, but I think its a good start.
What you are describing is probably more appropriately called 'fartlek training'. Swimmers use interval training in just about every single training session. If you have a pace clock where you swim, it's very easy to do.

As far as adding resistance via drag suits, stretch cords, etc. IMHO, it would be best to avoid them. It will break down your form pretty quickly unless you are using very light resistance and/or you are already a very strong swimmer. The only reason, IMHO, you would need that is if you are bored w. regular swimming.

If you want to increase power output in the water, you should do shorter distances w. relatively longer rest intervals while maintaining distance/stroke. A sample set might be something like:

*4 x 25m (12.5m fast, 12.5m easy) on 1min.
repeat 5 times w. an easy 50m swim inbetween

If you are just trying to burn calories, you can just do straight sets of whatever repeat speeds, distance, and intervals you'd like. I don't know how proficient a swimmer you are, but here are some random sets:

*10 x 100m IM (25butterfly, 25backstroke, 25breaststroke, 25freestyle) 30sec. rest inbetween each
*12 x 50m on 1min. in IM order (50 butterfly, 50 back, 50 breaststroke, 50 freestyle, etc.)
*10 x 100m freestyle on 2mins.

stepto180
04-11-2007, 09:00 PM
I have been doing some quasi hitt stlye swimming for my bodybuilding training
I go for as many as I can make in 20mins

here what I do

12.5 easy 12.5 sprint 15sec rest
12.5 sprint 12.5 hard 15sec rest
25 sprint 15 sec RI
25 easy 15 sec RI
I cycle this thru as many times as I can in 20min(I change strokes each time free,fly,free,back,free,breast...the free the rest of the way) I have gotten stuck at 900 yards I think its time to cut my rest down

Blanche_Soprano
04-11-2007, 09:29 PM
What you are describing is probably more appropriately called 'fartlek training'. Swimmers use interval training in just about every single training session. If you have a pace clock where you swim, it's very easy to do.

As far as adding resistance via drag suits, stretch cords, etc. IMHO, it would be best to avoid them. It will break down your form pretty quickly unless you are using very light resistance and/or you are already a very strong swimmer. The only reason, IMHO, you would need that is if you are bored w. regular swimming.

If you want to increase power output in the water, you should do shorter distances w. relatively longer rest intervals while maintaining distance/stroke. A sample set might be something like:

*4 x 25m (12.5m fast, 12.5m easy) on 1min.
repeat 5 times w. an easy 50m swim inbetween

If you are just trying to burn calories, you can just do straight sets of whatever repeat speeds, distance, and intervals you'd like. I don't know how proficient a swimmer you are, but here are some random sets:

*10 x 100m IM (25butterfly, 25backstroke, 25breaststroke, 25freestyle) 30sec. rest inbetween each
*12 x 50m on 1min. in IM order (50 butterfly, 50 back, 50 breaststroke, 50 freestyle, etc.)
*10 x 100m freestyle on 2mins.

I agree fully! Adding resistance creates a great workout, but is only really helpful for a swimmer, not a person looking for a way to burn some calories who's not a competetive swimmer. Plus, if you are struggling to finish, having all that added resistance is not going to help your form. Swimming is like bodybuilding, form is key. You will have a much more rewarding workout if you have better form. Try doing free and slap the water instead of sliding your hand in; you're not going to do so well.


Ancom, could you explain to me what you mean about the effects of swimming being from severe oxygen deprivation. As an ex-swimmer I don't think I've ever heard of this before.