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dtshen
01-22-2007, 08:28 AM
Do all fried foods contain trans fats ? I'm looking at my tortilla chips and they dont use partially hydrogenated veg oils.. does this mean theres no trans fats?

HOw does your body get rid of trans fats or does it just stay in there forever?

how many grams of trans fats would be reasonable to eat in a week?

Unreal
01-22-2007, 08:40 AM
No, not all fried foods contrain trans fat.
It burns it like other fats. Zero grams is reasonable. There is no reason to ever eat it in my opinion.

malkore
01-22-2007, 11:25 AM
actually they think trans fats aren't utilized the same way....that's why its best to avoid them.

as long as the ingredients don't list hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils or fats you should be ok.
but if the Nutrition Facts say 0g, that doesn't mean there's no trans fat...just means that one serving has 0.49g of trans fat or less....thus consult the ingredients to be certain.

dtshen
01-22-2007, 03:57 PM
im looking at wendy's nutritional info... their fries and nuggest dont have a lot of trans fats?? just .5 g for a fries and none for their nuggets? is this true?

whiteman90909
01-22-2007, 04:10 PM
im looking at wendy's nutritional info... their fries and nuggest dont have a lot of trans fats?? just .5 g for a fries and none for their nuggets? is this true?

Actually, Wendys is one of the only fast food places that no longer uses trans fats in their foods, if I'm not mistaken.

BostonBull
01-22-2007, 04:14 PM
KFC and Starbucks have also kicked the habit in my area.

FireRescue
01-22-2007, 05:34 PM
Actually, Wendys is one of the only fast food places that no longer uses trans fats in their foods, if I'm not mistaken.

I'm surprised the fast food industry is going to adopt this concept. However I guess it makes sense because now they can put a positive spin on the quality of the nutrition of their foods. Never mind the food is still loaded with saturated fats :rolleyes:

Holto
01-22-2007, 07:25 PM
I'm surprised the fast food industry is going to adopt this concept. However I guess it makes sense because now they can put a positive spin on the quality of the nutrition of their foods. Never mind the food is still loaded with saturated fats :rolleyes:

Trans fat is a toxin.

Saturated fat is a nutrient.

dtshen
01-22-2007, 08:19 PM
then does htis mean that wendy's nuggets arent too bad for you?


http://wendys.com/food/NutritionLanding.jsp

malkore
01-23-2007, 10:57 AM
JUST because it low or free of trans fat doesn't mean its good for you. You still have to look at total sodium, how processed it is, and of course its macro-nutrient breakdown.

looking at a 5piece crispy nugget from wendy: 230 cals, 15g fat, 12g protein.
whoa...MORE fat than protein, and its not a stick of butter or a tablespoon of peanut butter.

NOT GOOD.

drwost
01-23-2007, 11:16 AM
http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/reviews/transfats.html

Vapour Trails
01-23-2007, 11:52 AM
Trans fat is a toxin.

Saturated fat is a nutrient.

tox·in (tŏk'sĭn) Pronunciation Key
n. A poisonous substance, especially a protein, that is produced by living cells or organisms and is capable of causing disease when introduced into the body tissues but is often also capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies or antitoxins.

How does trans fat fit this definition?

Holto
01-23-2007, 05:23 PM
tox·in (tŏk'sĭn) Pronunciation Key
n. A poisonous substance, especially a protein, that is produced by living cells or organisms and is capable of causing disease when introduced into the body tissues but is often also capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies or antitoxins.

How does trans fat fit this definition?

A toxin, as defined in Natural/Alternative Medicine, is anything that is not a nutrient.

drwost
01-24-2007, 09:06 AM
tox·in (tŏk'sĭn) Pronunciation Key
n. A poisonous substance, especially a protein, that is produced by living cells or organisms and is capable of causing disease when introduced into the body tissues but is often also capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies or antitoxins.

How does trans fat fit this definition?

notable concern suggests that trans fatty acids disrupt cellular functioning and therefore may effect enzymes such as delta-6 desaturase which may in turn interfere with the conversion of omega-6 and omega-3 essentail fatty acids resulting in future deficiency of these acids.