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levronefan
02-03-2007, 01:10 AM
A question to the veterans regarding back squats that pertains to hip weakness. When i unrack the weight it feels extremely heavy however i can squat pretty strong.. It seems like it could be my abs too that are factoring into my weakness. i did think of doing some heavy walkouts after my workout to address the issue and also doing some more HEAVY ab work such as decline situps with weights...

but maybe im doing good squatting?? i did 265x8 ATG(alllll the way down) with a pause at the bottom, however i deadlifted 415x5 conventional the other day..


any suggestions ??

Sensei
02-03-2007, 04:47 AM
Personally, I'm not a big fan of heavy, heavy walkouts, but a lot of strong people do them.

If the weight is feeling damn heavy, you might try bringing up your upper back strength (shrugs, rows, etc.) and, like you mentioned, abs (ab pulldowns, spread eagle sit-ups).

vdizenzo
02-03-2007, 06:26 AM
Good mornings will greatly help strengthen your core. I would also recommend box squats if you think the problem may be with hip weakness. Just make sure when you hit the box to sit back a bit with your knees out and open up your hips before you try to pop up.

MasterOfPuppets
02-03-2007, 07:23 AM
If the weight is feeling damn heavy, you might try bringing up your upper back strength (shrugs, rows, etc.)

I have done these in the past:


The Hise Shrug


The Hise shrug, invented by Joseph Curtis Hise, who was often referred to as the "Father of American weight training" was a staple movement for strength athletes in the past. Today, it is seldom, if ever performed. In my 23 years of training, I have never seen anyone other than myself perform this movement which is unfortunate because it's an incredible exercise for upper back and even overall strength and development. To perform the Hise shrug, get into the exact position that you would for performing a back squat, with the bar high up on your traps. Stand erect and simply shrug your shoulders as high as possible to your ears. Pause as the top for a least a full second, lower and repeat. Coordinate your breathing so that you inhale as you shrug upwards and exhale as you let the shoulders back down. Start with moderate weights to get the form down, but eventually the goal is to use very heavy weights for very repetitions in the 20-25 range. This exercise will hurt-I can promise you that-but you will be rewarded with increased growth in your upper back and traps. I have also found that it also helps to establish a solid base for positioning the bar when doing squats.
Another version of this movement is to get into a standing calf machine with a solid foot placement and do shrugs with the yoke of the machine across the top of the shoulders. Use the same formula as the traditional Hise Shrugs-one heavy set of 20- 25 reps. I would perform the Hise Shrug at the end of the back workout as it can be quite taxing.

As is true with life and in the gym-if you are willing to pay the price that others will not-you will reap the benefits that others will not"

Keith Wassung

While I am no veteran, Keith Wassung is. :p

MOP

Sleepy Guy
02-03-2007, 11:57 AM
Well what I do in a situation that the weight feels heavier then it should is lower the weight and go for rep outs.

Really pushing the limit like 20-30 reps on a mid-heavy weight.

That way you are building up the muscle still but avoiding a possible injury. I find the body knows best, listen to it.

levronefan
02-03-2007, 07:04 PM
Personally, I'm not a big fan of heavy, heavy walkouts, but a lot of strong people do them.

If the weight is feeling damn heavy, you might try bringing up your upper back strength (shrugs, rows, etc.) and, like you mentioned, abs (ab pulldowns, spread eagle sit-ups).

im definitetely VERY strong and big in my upper back, that is by far my biggest strength...

http://www.wannabebigforums.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=22922&d=1167622500


i barbell row 275x12 times so thats not my weakness. abs may be the ticket

betastas
02-03-2007, 07:13 PM
Even though I squat less than you, I would recommend Good Mornings and heavier ab work, like standing cable crunches, russian twists, and other oblique work. GMs work the core like crazy, more than anything else I know. Strong abs are just flat out a necessity too. Doesn't matter how you do them, but you need them strong and holding out for all your sets.

Adam
02-03-2007, 10:21 PM
Also make sure your using your abs/gut correctly. Whether it be by pushing out into your not tight belt, or if your sans belt then sorta push yuor abs out a bit and flex them. You can find articles on using yoiur abs correctly.
BTW, I had the same problem, had loads of strength but everything felt heavy.

Stumprrp
02-03-2007, 11:07 PM
hise shrug is genious exersize.

i dont think it could be a lower back issue considering your deadlift?

RhodeHouse
02-04-2007, 02:01 PM
It's hard to say without seeing you squat. Unless you posted a link and I missed it.

You said when you take a heavy weight out it feels heavy. Heavy is something you can do for 1-3 reps. In that case, it should feel heavy. Train your entire body like everything is weak. Don't focus on 1 possibility and forget that everything needs to be strong. You should do all Accessory work in the 5-10 rep range. Make EVERYTHING stronger and don't get caught up trying to pinpoint the exact weakness. If you make everything stronger, your problems will go away.