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Hazerboy
02-12-2007, 03:11 PM
My sport season is over so now I'm back to weightlifting, but I'd really like to get more flexible too. I do gymnastics/breakdancing a couple times a week, so specifically I need more flexible hips, but better all around flexibility would be great too.

Any tips/websites/whatever? Any good books I could pick up on this stuff or some resources I could find online?

My long term goals would be the splits in all directions, but I know that takes a lot of work, and sometimes its just flat out impossible this late in the game - depending on your body type (so I've heard).

Max Thunder
02-12-2007, 04:20 PM
I find a good way to develop great hip flexibility are deep squats.

Some deep squats followed by (deep) overhead squats have helped a lot with my flexibility, both at the hips and at the shoulders. Plus, overhead squats teach you to keep the whole body tight and make it work as one.


There's that site I've found and read a couple of years ago: http://people.bath.ac.uk/masrjb/Stretch/stretching_toc.html

There's a section called "Working Toward the Splits", it might interest you!

I've never seriously followed a stretching program, so I don't know how well it works.


Pavel Tsatsouline has written a couple of good books about stretching, they're pretty expensive unless you borrow them...

Dinosaur
02-12-2007, 05:50 PM
I agree with Max Thunder, especially with the overhead squats.

Hazerboy
02-13-2007, 09:26 AM
Aw, I love overhead squats. Currently I can only do 3x5 with 90 lbs, but my form is really good. I don't have that wide of a stance and I got ATF. So you're saying I should just widen my stance a bit and keep doing them? Sounds kind of painful. Is there any risk for injury, as long as I lighten the weight?

bdckr
02-14-2007, 09:36 AM
I don't know what you mean by "late in the game", but I'm in my late thirties and recently managed the side splits after training about a year for them (after never doing any flexibility training before).

This (http://www.amazon.com/Stretching-Scientifically-Flexibility-Training-Revision/dp/0940149451) is the book I used for setting up a flexibility program. it's a good book, but don't get an earlier edition -- I've read criticisms of the earlier editions as being not very readable/practical.

Hazerboy
02-14-2007, 10:08 AM
I had heard that once you get to a certain age you just can't learn to do the splits because of the bones in your hips. Something about you must learn them early when your bones are softer.

I guess thats only true for certain bone structures, or not at all!

Dinosaur
02-14-2007, 04:01 PM
I had heard that once you get to a certain age you just can't learn to do the splits because of the bones in your hips. Something about you must learn them early when your bones are softer.

I guess thats only true for certain bone structures, or not at all!

That's not true. There's guys who in their 60s first started hitting the splits.

DaoineSidhe
02-18-2007, 07:25 PM
I don't know what you mean by "late in the game", but I'm in my late thirties and recently managed the side splits after training about a year for them (after never doing any flexibility training before).

This (http://www.amazon.com/Stretching-Scientifically-Flexibility-Training-Revision/dp/0940149451) is the book I used for setting up a flexibility program. it's a good book, but don't get an earlier edition -- I've read criticisms of the earlier editions as being not very readable/practical.

I winced when I saw that cover. Doesn't seem like a good idea to not have more support under your knees and hips.

Dinosaur
02-19-2007, 05:02 PM
^^That's actually a good book, it's helped me with my flexibility, though I'm not big into the isometric stretching. I eventually settled for Bob Anderson's Stretching book and plain old dynamic and PNF stretching.