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View Full Version : Sponsor shoot in the dark



The Champion
03-12-2007, 08:14 PM
AtLargeNutrition interested in sponsoring the Illinois Class AA Baseball State Championship team??... ETS could work wonders for baseball players arms

chris mason
03-12-2007, 09:11 PM
We are always interested in exploring such matters. With whom should I speak?

Chris

The Champion
03-30-2007, 02:57 PM
Sorry to get back to you so late. Had an injury and even spent some time in the hospital for another health issue and forgot about this. Send me a PM and I'll send you my coaches contact info and you can talk to him.

cphafner
03-30-2007, 11:08 PM
I have a very strong feeling that you can't sponsor a high school team. AAU might be another story. Sponsoring a high school team would put their amateur status at risk.

Alex.V
03-31-2007, 01:23 AM
Send me a PM and I'll send you my coaches contact info and you can talk to him.

Uh, maybe you didn't mean it this way, but that does sound a little imperious. I think this is a bigger opportunity for your team than for the company.

But yes, be very careful obtaining any kind of sponsorship as a high school athlete.

Detard
04-04-2007, 12:30 PM
Uh, maybe you didn't mean it this way, but that does sound a little imperious. I think this is a bigger opportunity for your team than for the company.

But yes, be very careful obtaining any kind of sponsorship as a high school athlete.

Sorry to dig up this thread but I was wondering about the last line here. Most senior/varsity teams at my school are sponsored by reebok or nike. I'm curious as to why it is bad/dangerous/against school policies or wahtever the reasoning is.

Bupp
04-04-2007, 01:35 PM
Lots of high school teams are sponsored.

Alex.V
04-04-2007, 02:23 PM
Because if you accept individual sponsorships of any kind, you can absolutely destroy your NCAA eligibility. Make sure you know the terms of said sponsorship, i.e. the duration of sponsorship, the nature of any gifts/items given, the scope (team versus individual), etc.

I'm not saying don't do it. I'm saying be careful.

WillKuenzel
04-04-2007, 03:34 PM
Being sponsored and having equipment donated is a different matter I believe. Many teams might have stuff donated.

Bupp
04-04-2007, 11:22 PM
If you are on a team that gives players anything above and beyond the following it is considered professional:

Actual and necessary expenses are limited to the following:
(a) Meals and lodging directly tied to competition and practice
held in preparation for competition;
(b) Transportation (i.e., expenses to and from practice and
competition, cost of transportation between home and the
training/practice site at the beginning and end of the season);
(c) Apparel, equipment and supplies related to participation on the
team;
(d) Coaching and instruction, use of facilities and entry fees;
(e) Health insurance, medical treatment and physical therapy; and
(f) Other reasonable expenses (e.g., laundry money).


So all the above is fine if you are an athlete. Personally amateurism requirements are ******ed. They were invented in britain 100+ years ago so that only upper class people would be able to afford competing in sports at a high level. The sooner they get rid of it the better.

Alex.V
04-05-2007, 09:26 AM
Personally amateurism requirements are ******ed. They were invented in britain 100+ years ago so that only upper class people would be able to afford competing in sports at a high level. The sooner they get rid of it the better.


I agree 100%, and unfortunately the requirements aren't getting any laxer. I've seen a lot of good college athletes get ****ed because of unintentional violations in this regard.

The Champion
04-05-2007, 08:44 PM
Wilson donated some gear for our team to use and give feedback about... I was figuring the same for ETS and baseball players.