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JoeGrinD
03-29-2007, 01:22 PM
Don't drink alcohol. Take vitamins. Avoid eating eggs. We've heard these pieces of nutritional advice for years - but are they accurate?

Not necessarily, say two exercise physiologists presenting at the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) 11th-annual Health & Fitness Summit & Exposition in Dallas, Texas. Wendy Repovich, Ph.D., FACSM, and Janet Peterson, Dr.P.H., FACSM, set out to debunk the "Top 10 Nutrition Myths."

Read the rest: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=66363&nfid=rssfeeds

What ya'll think?

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-29-2007, 02:24 PM
Is it all that difficult to copy and paste everything?


Don't drink alcohol. Take vitamins. Avoid eating eggs. We've heard these pieces of nutritional advice for years - but are they accurate?

Not necessarily, say two exercise physiologists presenting at the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) 11th-annual Health & Fitness Summit & Exposition in Dallas, Texas. Wendy Repovich, Ph.D., FACSM, and Janet Peterson, Dr.P.H., FACSM, set out to debunk the "Top 10 Nutrition Myths."

According to Repovich and Peterson, these nutrition myths are:

10. Eating carbohydrates makes you fat. Cutting carbs from your diet may have short-term weight loss benefits due to water loss from a decrease in carbohydrate stores, but eating carbs in moderation does not directly lead to weight gain. The body uses carbs for energy, and going too long without them can cause lethargy.

9. Drink eight, 8-oz. glasses of water per day. You should replace water lost through breathing, excrement and sweating each day - but that doesn't necessarily total 64 ounces of water. It's hard to measure the exact amount of water you have consumed daily in food and drink, but if your urine is pale yellow, you're doing a good job. If it's a darker yellow, drink more H2O.

8. Brown grain products are whole grain products. Brown dyes and additives can give foods the deceiving appearance of whole grain. Read labels to be sure a food is whole grain, and try to get three-ounce equivalents of whole grains per day to reduce the risk of heart disease, diabetes, and stroke.

7. Eating eggs will raise your cholesterol. This myth began because egg yolks have the most concentrated amount of cholesterol of any food. However, there's not enough cholesterol there to pose health risks if eggs are eaten in moderation. Studies suggest that eating one egg per day will not raise cholesterol levels and that eggs are actually a great source of nutrients.

6. All alcohol is bad for you. Again, moderation is key. Six ounces of wine and 12 ounces of beer are considered moderate amounts, and should not pose any adverse health effects to the average healthy adult. All alcohol is an anticoagulant and red wine also contains antioxidants, so drinking a small amount daily can be beneficial.

5. Vitamin supplements are necessary for everyone. If you eat a variety of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, along with moderate amounts of a variety of low-fat dairy and protein and the right quantity of calories, you don't need to supplement. Most Americans do not, so a multi-vitamin might be good. Special vitamin supplements are also recommended for people who are pregnant or have nutritional disorders.

4. Consuming extra protein is necessary to build muscle mass. Contrary to claims of some protein supplement companies, consuming extra protein does nothing to bulk up muscle unless you are also doing significant weight training at the same time. Even then the increased requirement can easily come from food. A potential problem with supplements is the body has to work overtime to get rid of excess protein, and can become distressed as a result.

3. Eating fiber causes problems if you have irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). There are two kinds of fiber: soluble and insoluble. Insoluble fiber can cause problems in IBS sufferers; soluble fiber, however, is more easily absorbed by the body and helps prevent constipation for those with IBS. Soluble fiber is found in most grains.

2. Eating immediately after a workout will improve recovery. Endurance athletes need to take in carbohydrates immediately after a workout to replace glycogen stores, and a small amount of protein with the drink enhances the effect. Drinking low-fat chocolate milk or a carbohydrate drink, like Gatorade, is better for the body, as they replace glycogen stores lost during exercise. Protein is not going to help build muscle, so strength athletes do not need to eat immediately following their workout.

1. Type 2 diabetes can be prevented by eating foods low on the glycemic index. High levels of glucose are not what "cause" diabetes; the disease is caused by the body's resistance to insulin. Foods high on the glycemic index can cause glucose levels to spike, but this is just an indicator of the presence of diabetes, not the root cause.

The Summit is presented this year with the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) as an educational partner.

The American College of Sports Medicine is the largest sports medicine and exercise science organization in the world. More than 20,000 International, National and Regional members are dedicated to promoting and integrating scientific research, education and practical applications of sports medicine and exercise science to maintain and enhance physical performance, fitness, health and quality of life.

CrazyK
03-29-2007, 06:10 PM
"Protein is not going to help build muscle". Wow...

JoeGrinD
03-29-2007, 07:43 PM
Is it all that difficult to copy and paste everything?

why are you so angry? :thumbup:

NewTriathlete
03-29-2007, 09:43 PM
"Protein is not going to help build muscle". Wow...

I'm pretty sure he is addressing here the idea that you can just drink a couple protien shakes a day with out working out and get huge.

D Breyer
03-29-2007, 10:02 PM
why are you so angry? :thumbup:
He wasn't angry with you, it's just that it's easier if people don't have to redirect to another site, especially if there isn't much content to copy-paste.

Some things on that list are BS.

the doc
03-29-2007, 10:12 PM
taking protein supplements alone will not make you huge... you have to lift weights to get bigger - wow

the sheer genius of that statement makes me want to go take a leak

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-29-2007, 10:27 PM
why are you so angry? :thumbup:I'm not angry. However, making people go to an external link when you could've simply pasted the entirety of the text in your thread isn't really helpful. This certainly isn't an issue to get angry over. But it is something to take with you for future reference.

Beast
03-29-2007, 10:39 PM
"Contrary to claims of some protein supplement companies, consuming extra protein does nothing to bulk up muscle unless you are also doing significant weight training at the same time."
What supplement company ever claimed that someone could eat protein and gain muscle without exercising?

The intended audience of this article was obviously morons.

Alex.V
03-29-2007, 11:04 PM
The intended audience of this article was obviously morons.

Or the average person.



Which, sadly, is synonymous.

JoeGrinD
03-30-2007, 07:52 AM
I'm not angry. However, making people go to an external link when you could've simply pasted the entirety of the text in your thread isn't really helpful. This certainly isn't an issue to get angry over. But it is something to take with you for future reference.

I was being sarcastic, but your point has been noted for future reference. Mi culpa!

greekboy80
03-30-2007, 08:03 AM
Its actually not THAT bad for the general public. but thats not saying much....

I had this same conversation with my wife's mom and son all the time. Its insane how uneducated the general public is about nutrition.

They still worry about fat content on thier foods, eat an overwhelmingly amoutn of carbs and not much protein. Her son is tryign to "work out" and "Bulk up" and I swear he barely gets 50 grams of protein a day, if that. He does countles bench presses and bicep curls every day. I try to tell him how to do it correctly, but they just dont get it.

My brother in law is 17 year old, his mom cooks him breakfast every morning which usually consists of, French toast(white bread) smothered in syrup, but that syrup is not "enough" so she then pours powdered sugar over the already smothered french toast. On the side she has a tall glass of HFCS laden "Sunny D" and a bannana to top it off. Oh yeah, and a multivitaman.

I say "my gosh, the kids going to be diabetic in a few years if he keeps that up..." her reply, is "well, its low fat, high in vitamin C and he's not fat now, so he must be healthy"

I almost had a coniption(sp?).

djreef
03-30-2007, 11:20 AM
her reply, is "well, its low fat, high in vitamin C and he's not fat now, so he must be healthy".

I've been having unprotected sex for years. I'm not shriveling up, so I must not have HIV.

DJ