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View Full Version : Eggs - eat the yolk or not?



Decker87
04-22-2007, 10:07 AM
I've noticed on fitday.com, that whole eggs have about 70% more protein than white only, but have almost 6 times the calories. But of course, much more fat. This all being said, should a weightlifter eat the yolks?

getfit
04-22-2007, 10:35 AM
why not.

Are you cutting,maintaining? bulking? If it fits in your daily caloric intake then why not.

joelhall
04-22-2007, 11:15 AM
Yeah eat the yolks, it's the best bit of the egg, and there's lots of protein and fats and vitamins you should have. The whites are just water with a dash of amino acid thrown in!

OhioPirate
04-22-2007, 03:42 PM
I usually eat 2 egg whites and 2 whole eggs in the morning (weekends - when I have time to cook)

lakeripple
04-22-2007, 07:36 PM
Its stupid to waste such a good form of protein, the only reason you should not be eating it is if you're trying to watch your fat intake. In which case I would still recommend cutting your fat intake from milk or something else in your diet before having to resort to not eating the yolk. Or you can go out and just purchase egg whites, this way your not wasting anything.

SupRsmall
04-22-2007, 11:33 PM
Its stupid to waste such a good form of protein, the only reason you should not be eating it is if you're trying to watch your fat intake. In which case I would still recommend cutting your fat intake from milk or something else in your diet before having to resort to not eating the yolk. Or you can go out and just purchase egg whites, this way your not wasting anything.

you also shouldn't be eating the egg yolk if u have high cholesterol. Egg yolks are very high in cholesterol.

joelhall
04-23-2007, 04:27 AM
dietry cholesterol doesnt raise your blood cholesterol, saruated fat does

Nosaj
04-24-2007, 02:50 AM
I cook batches of 32 eggs at a time. I'll eat 2 whole eggs and 8-10 egg whites in a sitting. Eggs are cheap and a great source of protein. Taste great on sandwiches too!

Decker87
04-24-2007, 05:33 AM
Can you buy just egg whites? Is it cheaper or more expensive? Where in a grocery store are they usually found?

shootermcgavin7
04-24-2007, 05:51 AM
you also shouldn't be eating the egg yolk if u have high cholesterol. Egg yolks are very high in cholesterol.



Eeeeeeesh.

manowar669
04-24-2007, 05:52 AM
Can you buy just egg whites? Is it cheaper or more expensive? Where in a grocery store are they usually found?

Usually not cheaper. They're usually in the dairy case in little pint or half-pint sized cartons. Just convenient.
Typically $1.50+ per cup (about 7-9 whites). I have a place near me that sells the cartons for $.50 (they're frozen and about to expire, I buy like 10-12 cartons per trip).

jostrichm
04-24-2007, 07:50 AM
Eeeeeeesh.

:withstupi

lol

SpecialK
04-24-2007, 09:06 AM
dietry cholesterol doesnt raise your blood cholesterol, saruated fat does

This seems to run contrary to the whole "saturated fats are good for you" statement that gets thrown around on here so often.

Perhaps Built or one of the other more knowledgable members could comment on this?

Mr. D
04-24-2007, 09:53 AM
Saturated fats raise both HDL and LDL. No one says make saturated fat your primary source. 1/3 of all your fats is a good guideline for the intake of sat. fats.

Again no one food item can be examined on its own.The big picture and total macros are whats important.

Beast
04-24-2007, 10:12 AM
dietry cholesterol doesnt raise your blood cholesterol, saruated fat does
Wrong. Dietary cholesterol can raise LDL cholesterol, but the effect is small compared to that of saturated fatty acids.

If I had high cholesterol, I sure as hell would avoid egg yolks.

SpecialK
04-24-2007, 10:18 AM
Wrong. Dietary cholesterol can raise LDL cholesterol, but the effect is small compared to that of saturated fatty acids.

If I had high cholesterol, I sure as hell would avoid egg yolks.

So is what Mr. D said correct? Saturated fats raise both HDL and LDL?

Beast
04-24-2007, 10:25 AM
So is what Mr. D said correct? Saturated fats raise both HDL and LDL?
lol, first time I've ever heard that one. Even if they do, their negative effects on raising LDL severely outweighs any type of an effect they have on HDL.

Want to know how to raise your HDL? Exercise and monounsaturated fats.

Mr. D
04-24-2007, 10:31 AM
Excerpt from Mmmmm Fat: http://www.wannabebig.com/article.php?articleid=284

Saturated

When all the available slots on the carbon chain are populated with hydrogen, we say the fat is saturated. Saturated fats are stable at higher heats fry your steak in butter or even coconut oil. While implicated in increasing both good and bad cholesterol, saturated fat is important in the production of steroid hormones, such as testosterone. (24)Unfortunately, saturated fat also increases insulin resistance. So you do need SOME saturated fat in your diet. Just not an all-bacon diet, okay?

24. Dorgan J, et al. Effects of dietary fat and fiber on plasma and urine androgens and estrogens in men: a controlled feeding study. Am J Clin Nutr 64(6): 850-855. 1996. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?CMD=search&DB=pubmed

Beast
04-24-2007, 10:39 AM
Cool article! Let me ask you a question: did you actually read the Pubmed article, Mr. D? Because if you did, you would have realized that it had nothing to do with cholesterol. The only thing they measured was plasma and urine sex hormones.
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought this discussion was about saturated fat's effects on cholesterol?

Mr. D
04-24-2007, 10:51 AM
I didnt read the pubmed :(

But i think the reference is there regarding the statement "saturated fat is important in the production of steroid hormones, such as testosterone."

Beast
04-24-2007, 11:03 AM
You should read the abstract. It concludes that over 10 weeks, men on a high-fat diet with 41.0% of calories from fat (with a polyunsaturated to saturated fat of 0.6) had increased urine concentrations of testosterone and increased total testosterone levels than men on a low-fat diet with 18.8% of energy from fat (with a polyunsaturated to saturated fat ratio of 1.3). It does not mention anything about "saturated fat raising both HDL and LDL" which you said in your first reply to this thread.

I do understand how you were slightly mislead in the journal citation, though.

shootermcgavin7
04-24-2007, 12:17 PM
Wrong. Dietary cholesterol can raise LDL cholesterol, but the effect is small compared to that of saturated fatty acids.

If I had high cholesterol, I sure as hell would avoid egg yolks.


Why?

You seem to agree that there is at best a weak correlation between dietary & blood cholesterol...but still say you'd skip the egg yolk?

Maybe I misread your post....?

Guido
04-24-2007, 12:42 PM
Why?

You seem to agree that there is at best a weak correlation between dietary & blood cholesterol...but still say you'd skip the egg yolk?

Maybe I misread your post....?Personally I would avoid anything that raised my LDL even a little bit unless I was offsetting it with lot's of HDL-raising foods or Omega 3.

Beast
04-24-2007, 12:54 PM
Why?

You seem to agree that there is at best a weak correlation between dietary & blood cholesterol...but still say you'd skip the egg yolk?

Maybe I misread your post....?
I said if I had high cholesterol, I would definitely skip the yolk (and any other cholesterol-rich and especially saturated fat-rich foods). If you had high cholesterol, wouldn't you want to try your best to avoid foods that increase your cholesterol levels?

Personally I would avoid anything that raised my LDL even a little bit unless I was offsetting it with lot's of HDL-raising foods or Omega 3.
Same here. It only makes sense.

Rock Steady
04-24-2007, 01:15 PM
But the yolk will give you such a nice shiny coat.

Nosaj
04-24-2007, 07:11 PM
But the yolk will give you such a nice shiny coat.

Are you implying you want to stroke him? :angel:

shootermcgavin7
04-24-2007, 07:21 PM
Both Beast & Guido -- have either of you seen any research re: the variable benefits of the unsaturated fat in the yolk.....especially if the hens are fed correctly and they're high in Omega 3s?

I'm not a nutritionist and don't know if any empirical work has been done on it; but I'd be surprised if the slight rise in LDL caused by the cholesterol in the yolk wouldn't be more than offset, nutritionally, by the vitamins/unsaturated fats/etc in the egg yolk.

Beast
04-24-2007, 07:47 PM
That's a good question, shooter. I haven't seen research for that on a mg per mg basis.

Rock Steady
04-24-2007, 07:50 PM
Are you implying you want to stroke him? :angel:

Lmao - clever bastard

Nosaj
04-24-2007, 09:56 PM
Lmao - clever bastard

Mwuahaha.

On a side note about cholesterol, I've reduced my egg yolk consumption because last time I got my cholesterol checked it was at 206 and the high end of the healthy range was 200, so I was just over. I am under the impression that egg yolks and red meats are the opposite of what you want to be eating if cholesterol is an issue.