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mister manager
05-07-2007, 08:49 AM
has anyone here ran a marathon before? im considering training for a marathon and was wondering if 8 months would be sufficient time to train if you are basically starting from scratch.

iRun
05-07-2007, 10:49 AM
yes.
run for a couple weeks first and at least get to where you can run at least 3 miles at once then follow a marathon training program. if you can run 3 miles right now run for 2-3 weeks 4 times a week of easy running. and i mean easy.

Y2A
05-07-2007, 05:35 PM
I've run a marathon... I don't recommend the training I did though, it was only 6 miles, once a week on a treadmill, for 10 weeks. It's not that hard to finish one, but finishing in a good time is a different story (took me 5 and a half hours lol). I think 8 months is plenty of time for a training program!

iRun
05-07-2007, 09:51 PM
Y2A, did you run the entire thing?

mister manager
05-08-2007, 05:03 AM
alright so scratch the 8 months.

theres a marathon in Toronto at the end of September I have my sights on. So is 5 months going to be sufficient?

iRun
05-08-2007, 06:36 PM
man it would take some hard work. especially starting from scratch. 5 months might be to short of time. you could complete it but I do not know about runnign the entire thing if that is your goal. IMO you haven't done a marathon unless you ran the entire way. but i do not want to say you cant do it, it will be rather difficult.

drwost
05-10-2007, 07:10 AM
My wife ran NYC marathon 3 times...each time she logged under 4 hours. she was averaging 25-30 miles per week. 8 months should be fine depending on your current conditioning. about 4-6 weeks out you should do at least a 1/2 marathon. If you can do that then the whole marathon is cake walk. Good luck

iRun
05-10-2007, 09:07 PM
My wife ran NYC marathon 3 times...each time she logged under 4 hours. she was averaging 25-30 miles per week. 8 months should be fine depending on your current conditioning. about 4-6 weeks out you should do at least a 1/2 marathon. If you can do that then the whole marathon is cake walk. Good luck

just because you can run 13.1m miles doesn't mean a marathon will be easy. you are only half way done and have 13.1 miles to go.
you should build up to a run of 20 miles towards then end of training. or at least get to 18 miles.

Organichu
05-10-2007, 09:54 PM
I'm running a marathon later this summer. I'm currently running 60 mile weeks. I'm hoping for a final time of 3:30-3:45.

Y2A
05-30-2007, 05:49 PM
Y2A, did you run the entire thing?

Nah, around mile 19 both of my calves cramped at the same time so I stopped periodically after that to stretch them when they cramped. I got a medal so I know it counts :) But "idontrun" - generally ;)

Organichu
05-30-2007, 07:28 PM
Just hit my first 75 mile week. Best of luck to anyone else aiming for a marathon this summer.

Maki Riddington
05-30-2007, 09:11 PM
Make sure to structure your strength training around your running. Not the other way around.

Also make sure you get in some mobility and soft tissue work as well. Running in a straight line 50-60 miles a week can cause some nasty imbalances.

Organichu
05-30-2007, 09:20 PM
Maki- on the former, yeah, that's how I've been operating.

Any ideas for specifics on the latter?

I do some general GPP, but that's it.

Kelly Bruno
05-31-2007, 07:08 AM
alright so scratch the 8 months.

theres a marathon in Toronto at the end of September I have my sights on. So is 5 months going to be sufficient?

5 months of training should be sufficient to finish this marathon. The course looks relatively flat; there are some downhill portions near the beginning too. The only concern would be the weather. How cold does it get in Toronto in September? You might have to learn how to shed layers while running or start out the race a bit cold. If you build a strong base over the next month and a half you should be able to start getting in long runs by mid-July. By then you should be putting in 25-40 mile weeks. I wouldn't recommend any longer than that as it will significantly increase your risk of injury and overtraining. You'll want to be very careful with long runs, especially when you haven't been running long because often times biomechanic imbalances are magnified and can lead to chronic overuse injuries (ie: shin splints, runner's knee, ITB syndrome, achilles tendonitis). So build a base first, get in some speed work, then get in some long runs.

mister manager
06-01-2007, 06:23 AM
Toronto in September is probably about 15 celcius average