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arturo
05-08-2007, 06:09 PM
I know its suggested that you eat every 3 hours to maintain the metabolism going....I heard that you're suppose to eat protein every 3 hours to increase metabolism and/or make you leaner.

Howard 9
05-08-2007, 06:20 PM
Just space your meals around every couple hours and make sure you get 1g of protein per LB.

JimR
05-08-2007, 07:17 PM
I know its suggested that you eat every 3 hours to maintain the metabolism going....I heard that you're suppose to eat protein every 3 hours to increase metabolism and/or make you leaner.

No, studies have shown it makes no difference. Whatever your comfortable with. I like intermittent fasting. Nothing but coffee during the day and feasting at night.

Chris686
05-08-2007, 08:20 PM
No, studies have shown it makes no difference. Whatever your comfortable with. I like intermittent fasting. Nothing but coffee during the day and feasting at night.

I'm sure your diet and lifts are great as a result.

JimR
05-08-2007, 08:33 PM
I'm sure your diet and lifts are great as a result.

I see that the majority of your posts are of a critical,sarcastic nature.

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
05-08-2007, 11:58 PM
No, studies have shown it makes no difference. Whatever your comfortable with. I like intermittent fasting. Nothing but coffee during the day and feasting at night.I wouldn't recommend fasting all day while drinking a diuretic on top of that for a good portion of the day...and then finally eating in the wee hours of the night. Whatever floats your boat, I guess.

To the OP...it's a good idea to have protein with every meal. Just buy a bag of mixed nuts or something of the sort and munch on 'em whenever. It's easy calories, healthy fat, and protein. As for eating every 3 hours, that really has little to no effect on your metabolism. Like Jim said, the frequency you eat has more to do with personal preference than anything...but what he's doing I wouldn't recommend. Eat when you can...just make sure to hit your caloric and macros needs. Some people get hungry at night and prefer to save all their calories for the end of the day. This is especially satiating on a cut.

samj
05-09-2007, 05:37 AM
No, studies have shown it makes no difference. Whatever your comfortable with. I like intermittent fasting. Nothing but coffee during the day and feasting at night.

HAHA NUGGET thats you in your pic i guess

BigBossMan
05-21-2007, 04:16 PM
I have read that eating every three hours keeps you body with + nitrogen levels and keeps muscles from entering a catabolic state.....

mritche
05-21-2007, 05:23 PM
Here (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10731010&dopt=Abstract) is a study which might be relevant to your question. This is part of it:


There was a significant relationship between the number of daily energy deficits > 300 kcal and DEXA-derived body fat percent for gymnasts (r = 0.508; P = 0.001) and for runners (r = 0.461; P = 0.041). There was also a negative relationship between the largest daily energy surplus and DEXA-derived body fat percentage for gymnasts (r = -0.418; P = 0.003). Using the energy balance variables, age, and athlete type (artistic gymnast, rhythmic gymnast, middle-distance runner, long-distance runner) as independent variables in a forward stepwise regression analysis, a small but significant amount of variance was explained in DEXA-derived (P = 0.000; R2 = 0.309) and skinfold-derived (P = 0.000; R2 = 0.298) body fat percent by the number of energy deficits > 300 kcal and age. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that within-day energy deficits (measured by frequency and/or magnitude of deficit) are associated with higher body fat percentage in both anaerobic and aerobic elite athletes, possibly from an adaptive reduction in the REE. These data should discourage athletes from following restrained or delayed eating patterns to achieve a desired body composition.

Built
05-21-2007, 05:41 PM
You just posted this elsewhere. I posted this in response:

I'm reading this, and there are a number of flags that jump out at me. They don't mention what the caloric deficit was that these women were running - only the mean hourly deficits and surpluses. These athletes were not on calorie-controlled diets from what I see. I don't know how much protein and fat they were consuming. I also don't see anywhere a report on long-term changes in body composition, nor is any mention made of nutrient timing surrounding training, which becomes progressively more and more critical the leaner you become.

Daily fluctuations don't mean much if they're not sustained over time.

Finally, if you hold on to a couple more ounces of fat because of meal frequency, but you're more comfortable dieting this way and are better able to stick to a plan this way, you'll still do better than you would have if you tried to diet in a way you couldn't maintain.