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View Full Version : Lay's using sunflower oil, new to me!



theJamAbides
05-12-2007, 11:45 AM
OK, so months ago I stopped even going to the chip aisle, I just dind't want all the greasy transfat's and what not.

Then My dad whips out this bag of Lay's Regular potato chips. It's not a special type or anything, it's just their standard potato chip. I read on the package that it uses sunflower oil now, has 0 trans fats and the nutritional breakdown really isn't that bad.

It only has 3 ingredients now: Potatoes, sunflower oil, salt

It has 10 g of fat per serving (1 sat, 3 poly, 6 mono), 15g carbs, and 2g protein.

I eat potato chips again! Woohoo!

http://www.lays.com/

Howard 9
05-12-2007, 12:25 PM
How many chips is a serving?

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
05-12-2007, 01:15 PM
Like 1.

theJamAbides
05-12-2007, 04:28 PM
15 chips. 150 calories. Obviously, it's not something you can chow down on if you are cutting, but it's not unhealthy anymore.

mritche
05-12-2007, 04:50 PM
Just don't go too overboard, the polys are all omega-6s (which we all get too much of relative to omega-3s).

sharkall2003
05-12-2007, 04:54 PM
I'd like to let you know just because the label says "0 grams of Trans Fats" that's not necessarily the case. The FDA has said that if it has .5 grams of trans fats that it can be labeled as zero trans fats. They're tricky, but I'd bet they're still in there. It's a lot easier to produce products with trans fats.

That's how much the government really cares about you. In Canada it's .2 grams or lower and it's considered zero. How ridiculous.

Mad Martigan
05-12-2007, 05:19 PM
Italian herb FTW.

theJamAbides
05-12-2007, 07:51 PM
I'd like to let you know just because the label says "0 grams of Trans Fats" that's not necessarily the case. The FDA has said that if it has .5 grams of trans fats that it can be labeled as zero trans fats. They're tricky, but I'd bet they're still in there. It's a lot easier to produce products with trans fats.

That's how much the government really cares about you. In Canada it's .2 grams or lower and it's considered zero. How ridiculous.

But they still have to list the ingredients don't they? I'm pretty sure sunflower oil is trans fat free. The bag literally says: Potatoes, Sunflower Oil, Salt.

I would like to know for sure though.... lemme seeeeee....

theJamAbides
05-12-2007, 07:54 PM
Wikipedia:


Sunflower oil is high in the essential vitamin E and low in saturated fat. The two most common types of sunflower oil are linoleic and high oleic. Linoleic sunflower oil is a common cooking oil that has high levels of the essential fatty acids called polyunsaturated fat. It is also known for having a clean taste and low levels of trans fat. High oleic sunflower oils are classified as having monounsaturated levels of 80% and above. Newer versions of sunflower oil have been developed as a hybrid containing linoleic acid. They have monounsaturated levels lower than other oleic sunflower oils. The hybrid oil also has lower saturated fat levels than linoleic sunflower oil [2]. Sunflower oil of any kind has been shown to have cardiovascular benefits as well. Diets combined with a low fat content and high levels of oleic acid have been suggested to lower cholesterol which, in turn, results in a smaller risk of heart disease [3]. Sunflower oils fit this criteria. A diet consisting of sunflower oil may lower cholesterol by as much as 5%. Studies of adults suggested that a balanced diet with sunflower oil has detectable cholesterol- reducing benefits. Research suggests that lower cholesterol levels can be caused by balances of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. Sunflower oil may help with this balance

So it has some... now, to find out just how much....

Built
05-12-2007, 07:58 PM
I'm pretty sure any health benefits from consuming PUFAs will be removed from this source: PUFAs are damaged by the high heat required to fry the chips.

theJamAbides
05-12-2007, 08:10 PM
I'm pretty sure any health benefits from consuming PUFAs will be removed from this source: PUFAs are damaged by the high heat required to fry the chips.

You are probably right. But the mono is still there. And according to the National Sunflower Association, they started growing sunflowers that produce no trans fats at all around 1996.

http://www.sunflowernsa.com/


NuSun sunflower oil is stable without partial hydrogenation. It outshines other oils for commercial use by providing optimal healthy benefits, great taste, and superior performance, while remaining trans fat free.

...

Initial testing of the new sunflower type began in 1996. In 1998, commercial volumes were available. In 2003, NuSun varieties were 55% of total oilseed acres planted with future growth expected. In 2005, it is estimated that 70% of the 2.2 million acres are NuSun.

Built
05-12-2007, 08:15 PM
Stable ... to what temperature?

Max Thunder
05-12-2007, 08:30 PM
It's obvious there's some hidden trans fat in there, otherwise the label would say 0.0g, not just a big 0.

It's been many years since Lays started to be "trans fat free", at least in Canada.

Another reason not to eat potato chips, other than the high carb counts, is the acrylamide which is formed when potatoes (and anything starchy) is cooked at a very high temperature.

theJamAbides
05-13-2007, 02:12 PM
Stable ... to what temperature?

Built, I've searched far and wide to find out that answer, but it's nowhere.