PDA

View Full Version : Top 4 Problems in High School Training



Sensei
06-23-2007, 06:04 PM
Since it's summer and there are more high school students here than normal, I thought someone might get something out of these articles by Chris Korfist. I don't agree with everything, but they are good, solid articles.

Top 4 Problems in High School Training by Chris Korfist (Part I - Poor Hip Extension Development)
http://inno-sport.net/Top%20Four%20Problems%20in%20High%20School%20Training.htm

Top 4 Problems in High School Training by Chris Korfist
(Part II - Poor Plantar Flexion Development)
http://inno-sport.net/HS%20Training%20Problems%202.htm

Top 4 Problems in High School Training by Chris Korfist (Part III - White Men Can't Jump)
http://inno-sport.net/HS%20Problems%20Number%203.htm

Top 4 Problems in High School Training by Chris Korfist (Part IV - Plyometric Insanity)
http://inno-sport.net/HS%20Training%20Problems%204.htm

WVtackle72
06-25-2007, 07:19 AM
nice tips

Andre3000
06-26-2007, 07:27 PM
Sorry if this is posted in an obvious place that I can't see, but what has Chris Korfist done, or what athletes has he trained, that we should be taking his advice. Not to shoot down what he's saying, I agree with a lot of it, but some other things make me want to see some credentials before i put full faith in what he says.

Sensei
06-26-2007, 08:22 PM
Sorry if this is posted in an obvious place that I can't see, but what has Chris Korfist done, or what athletes has he trained, that we should be taking his advice.A simple google search of his name will turn up his credentials.

Not to shoot down what he's saying, I agree with a lot of it, but some other things make me want to see some credentials before i put full faith in what he says.I would never put "full faith" in a given cookie-cutter program - you have to decide for yourself whether an approach, technique, or system is going to work with yourself or your athletes.

Judge an article by its validity, not by whether the guy has "coached numerous world class athletes" or not. It always amazes me how much crap some of the most well-known S&C gurus spit out in articles found throughout the net. I swear some of those guys throw together the most outlandish routines just to see if anyone is stupid enough to be their guinea pig...

What specifically were you questioning in the articles, or were you only questioning his credentials? I'm not trying to beat you down for questioning the guy, but keep an open mind. Like I said in the original post, I don't necessarily agree with everything Chris is saying in these articles. However, there are, IMHO, some real gems in them.

Andre3000
06-27-2007, 04:38 PM
i agree with what you're saying. I was knid of being lazy on the name, but I agree with a lot of what he's saying about sprting and hip training and such, but his squat variations, like iso squats, that he wants to put in place of actual front or back squats, which is what i believe he's implying, seems iffy to me. like...

"Squats have been shown to reduce vertical jump in 1 workout"

"What I am recommending is the replacement of squats with ISO squats, ISO single leg squats and OI HF Squats. "

And his use of depth jumps in article 3, yet ridicule of them in another article kind of confuses me.

Sensei
06-28-2007, 12:11 AM
His point is that overemphasis on squats can be detrimental to a young, developing athlete's progress. Definitely true for a lot of young athletes who are spending time in the weight room and zero attention to running or jumping mechanics.

Reactive squats are essentially squats with a quick eccentric - I wouldn't recommend them for kids who aren't already fairly proficient squatters, but they wouldn't be a bad exercise at all.

And his use of depth jumps in article 3, yet ridicule of them in another article kind of confuses me.
I really don't see where this ridicule is... I think you are getting confused by the jargon (which IS confusing btw) and need to read the article with a view towards the global meaning rather than sentence level...

There are a lot of things in the article that could apply to many, many high school burgeoning athletes. For example, there are so many kids that are astoundingly weak, uncoordinated, and inflexible - handing them an empty bar or dowel and having them do endless sloppy reps is not how to teach them to squat, bench, or deadlift. Having them do iso holds at or towards the bottom of the movement could very well be a great first step in developing the requisite strength and flexibility to do full range movements.

Guido
06-28-2007, 10:08 AM
Interesting reads. Thanks, Sensei.

schmitty199
06-28-2007, 12:02 PM
Thanks sensei. But it looks like our program actually has most of that covered. Using the glute- ham machine is in our workout and our coaches really get after us to make sure were doing it. We do toe raises off a raised surface.(4 inch box type thing)

We have a Verti-max to work on jumping explosiveness. We probably dont do that one as much as we should though.

Not sure on the plyometric thing though. No clue if we do them correctly or not.

Hazerboy
07-05-2007, 08:06 PM
Stronger hips/hamstrings? Why not SLDL's or regular deadlifts. There's almost no eccentric movement, and if you really want to focus on speed you could just do some speed singles of half your max.

I was surprised he didn't mention dynamic box squats either instead of all these other goofy variations.

Sensei
07-09-2007, 08:50 PM
Stronger hips/hamstrings? Why not SLDL's or regular deadlifts. There's almost no eccentric movement, and if you really want to focus on speed you could just do some speed singles of half your max.

I was surprised he didn't mention dynamic box squats either instead of all these other goofy variations.
I think he was pretty clear on why squats were not enough - the deceleration at the top coupled with no propulsion behind the trainee... I get tired of saying this, but even though I DON'T AGREE WITH EVERYTHING THE GUY SAYS, he makes some great points...