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Bruce Calavera
06-29-2007, 10:16 PM
I'm told that by eating your body weight in kilos worth of protein a day, one can maintain his or her body weight.

I'm new to this weight lifting, getting into shape thing and this makes no sense to me. Mainly because I've had times in my life where I've had 80% or more of my diet come from beer and the other 20% from fast food. This did not cause my muscles to fall apart. I have a roomate who consumes at least 6 40oz a day as his entire diet and he still has muscle on his bones(I understand this has cause several other problems). It's not defined or up to par by any means but it's there. Another thing is that his body can't be converting fat into muscle because that's impossible.

How does one not loose muscle when they have almost no daily protein intake. And why should I believe that I need to eat my body weight in grams of protein to gain muscle. Exactly how much protein does an 87 kilo male have to consume to just "maintain" his muscle.

I'm just really confused on the science of the subject and the reality that I've seen.

Howard 9
06-29-2007, 10:29 PM
Protein has nothing to do with maintaining your weight, increasing it, or losing it. Calories do.

Caloric Excess = Weight Gain
Caloric Matienence = Stay the same weight
Caloric Deficit = Weight Loss

I don't know about kilos, but I would shoot for 1.25g per LB of protein a day.
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=protein+muscles+why&btnG=Google+Search

Bruce Calavera
06-29-2007, 10:58 PM
So I'm supposed to be eating 250g of protein a day to increase muscle mass. On a college income how would one effectively accomplish this all the while paying bills.

The Champion
06-30-2007, 12:18 AM
So I'm supposed to be eating 250g of protein a day to increase muscle mass. On a college income how would one effectively accomplish this all the while paying bills.

If you have a meal plan with the school... LOAD UP THE BUFFET.

If you're living off-campus. Canned Tuna is cheap, and eggs are cheap.

jtteg_x
06-30-2007, 12:58 AM
theirs also protein supplements for convience.

what is your current body weight? right now im taking 1g per lb of bodyweight. im prob 20% bodyfat though. so far so good

kate
06-30-2007, 02:06 AM
Protein has nothing to do with maintaining your weight, increasing it, or losing it. Calories do.

Caloric Excess = Weight Gain
Caloric Matienence = Stay the same weight
Caloric Deficit = Weight Loss

I don't know about kilos, but I would shoot for 1.25g per LB of protein a day.
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=protein+muscles+why&btnG=Google+Search

but protein does have something to do with maintaining muscle

kate
06-30-2007, 02:10 AM
theirs also protein supplements for convience.

what is your current body weight? right now im taking 1g per lb of bodyweight. im prob 20% bodyfat though. so far so good

this is where i get confused! we in australia go by kilograms, and have always thought u r meant to eat 1g of protein per kg of body weight.
then i came here and majority of poeple here go by lbs and have 1g protein per 1lbs of body weight, but there are 2.2kgs in a lbs.
which means i would be eating twice whats needed if the lbs method is accurate and u would be eating half of whats needed if my method is correct...geddit???
how confusing!!!!!
anyone know???

Bleek13
06-30-2007, 03:13 AM
this is where i get confused! we in australia go by kilograms, and have always thought u r meant to eat 1g of protein per kg of body weight.
then i came here and majority of poeple here go by lbs and have 1g protein per 1lbs of body weight, but there are 2.2kgs in a lbs.
which means i would be eating twice whats needed if the lbs method is accurate and u would be eating half of whats needed if my method is correct...geddit???
how confusing!!!!!
anyone know???

wrong way around. Kgs are worth more than lbs.

kate
06-30-2007, 03:59 AM
so if i weight 150lbs, i weigh 300kgs???

Bleek13
06-30-2007, 04:32 AM
so if i weight 150lbs, i weigh 300kgs???

http://www.onlineconversions.com/weight.php

No no, 150lbs = 68kg

kate
06-30-2007, 04:35 AM
lol, yes i know, isnt it what i said in my first post?? coz we work in kgs and i always multiply x2.2 to get lbs. mayb my first explanation was a bit confusing.its ok we are on the same page

Bleek13
06-30-2007, 04:42 AM
but there are 2.2kgs in a lbs.

Yeah, that's the part that confused me. 2.2lbs in a Kg.

I heard that the average human needs to consume around 70 lbs daily to stay healthy, but for bodybuilding I've often read, take 1 gram per pound of bodyweight.

kate
06-30-2007, 04:51 AM
ok...lol we got it straight!

bjohnso
06-30-2007, 10:42 AM
Actually, kg is a unit of mass, and pound is a unit of weight. So technically, 1kg does not equal 2.2 pounds, because they are not measuring the same thing. It would be correct to say "An object with a mass of 1kg weighs 2.204lbs at sea level.

:redface: I apologize in advance.


But 1g protein per 1kg body mass seems awfully low to me, unless you are a normal person (i.e. small and weak).

Bruce Calavera
07-01-2007, 02:54 AM
I know the rule is 1g of protein per kilo because the formula was invented by Europeans and when Americans started using this formula and had no clue what a kilo was they just changed it to pounds. I did the research.

Back to one of my main questions, why is it that when I eat no protein, my body doesn't loose muscle.

mikesbytes
07-01-2007, 04:53 AM
Actually, kg is a unit of mass, and pound is a unit of weight. So technically, 1kg does not equal 2.2 pounds, because they are not measuring the same thing. It would be correct to say "An object with a mass of 1kg weighs 2.204lbs at sea level.

So when posting my weights, ie 100kg/220lbs*8*1 I should determine how far above sea level the gym is. Should I train at a higher or lower altitude?

bjohnso
07-01-2007, 08:43 AM
So when posting my weights, ie 100kg/220lbs*8*1 I should determine how far above sea level the gym is. Should I train at a higher or lower altitude?

LOL! I was just being an as5. I am sorry ;) Virtually no difference as long as you are somewhere on the surface of the earth.

devo
07-01-2007, 12:52 PM
Actually, kg is a unit of mass, and pound is a unit of weight. So technically, 1kg does not equal 2.2 pounds, because they are not measuring the same thing. It would be correct to say "An object with a mass of 1kg weighs 2.204lbs at sea level.


Ah, last time I checked, pounds (lb) and kilograms (kg) were both units of mass. One is simply a numeric conversion of the other. One is metric (kg), the other being imperial (lb). Saying that kg is a unit of mass and pounds is a unit of weight would be akin to saying that 100 km\h is a speed while 100 miles\h is a velocity.

of course all of this doesn't have much relevance to this thread. for what it's worth, I try to shoot for at least 1.20 gram of protein per lb of body weight.

bjohnso
07-01-2007, 02:03 PM
lbs is a unit of force. The imperial unit of mass is the slug, which weighs 32.2 pounds. The SI unit of force is the Newton.

Walrus
07-01-2007, 02:14 PM
why is it that when I eat no protein, my body doesn't loose muscle.


:eek:

mikesbytes
07-01-2007, 05:04 PM
LOL! I was just being an as5. I am sorry ;) Virtually no difference as long as you are somewhere on the surface of the earth.

So lifting isn't like running where you benefit from training at high altitudes. Phew, I can keep living by the ocean.

kate
07-01-2007, 05:44 PM
for goodness sake...lol
WHO CARES!! :omg:
lets move on shall we??

bjohnso
07-01-2007, 07:37 PM
So lifting isn't like running where you benefit from training at high altitudes. Phew, I can keep living by the ocean.

I thought you were joking with your post. The reason runners train at higher altitude is because the air pressure is a lot lower up there - with each breath they take in significantly less air than we do at lower levels. Then when they come and compete at a lower altitude they perform much better because they are taking in much more oxygen then they are used to. I'm not sure how much a weightlifter would benefit from training at a higher altitude, but no matter where you are on the surface of the earth (even at the top of Mount Everest) the difference in weight is so tiny you can't even measure it unless you have the finest equipment.

bjohnso
07-01-2007, 07:37 PM
for goodness sake...lol
WHO CARES!! :omg:
lets move on shall we??

Sorry Kate :redface:

dscarth
07-01-2007, 08:36 PM
lbs is a unit of force. The imperial unit of mass is the slug, which weighs 32.2 pounds. The SI unit of force is the Newton.

foot-pounds are units of force.

BBB
07-01-2007, 09:12 PM
No, the ft-lb is a unit of work. Work = Force (lb) * Distance (foot). Pounds are a unit of force.

bjohnso
07-01-2007, 10:17 PM
I'd say this thread is thoroughly hijacked!

mikesbytes
07-01-2007, 10:55 PM
http://www.frombearcreek.com/hijacked.jpg

kate
07-01-2007, 11:30 PM
haha dats naughty!

dscarth
07-06-2007, 05:20 PM
No, the ft-lb is a unit of work. Work = Force (lb) * Distance (foot). Pounds are a unit of force.

I was mistaken, the correct term would be pound force not foot-pound force (1 pound force = 4.44822162 newtons).
Pounds are still a unit of mass, not force.


mikesbytes: I like the hijack pic.

BBB
07-06-2007, 06:04 PM
I was mistaken, the correct term would be pound force not foot-pound force (1 pound force = 4.44822162 newtons).
Pounds are still a unit of mass, not force.


mikesbytes: I like the hijack pic.


Pounds are NOT a unit of mass - whereas kilograms are. Pounds are a unit of force...go break open your high school physics book and look it up if you don't believe me.

mikesbytes
07-06-2007, 06:39 PM
Can't get out of my head that 1kg = 1litre of water at 20degC. Probably BS.