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View Full Version : Calories in and calories absorbed



BFGUITAR
07-18-2007, 05:02 PM
As we all know, much of the stuff we eat is excreted through our anus as waste. How much of the calories we eat are actually absorbed into our body and used?

Unholy
07-18-2007, 05:06 PM
87.32432234%

That doesn't just depend on the person, but what it is that you are eating. If you eat something and get the runs an hour later you are going to get much less nutrients out of it than something thats been sitting in your body for 8-10 hours.

RedSpikeyThing
07-18-2007, 08:05 PM
assuming normal digestion, I think it is whatever it says on the package. My only reasoning is that the information on the package only considers the things you can digest. For example, fibre doesn't contribute to the number of calories in the food.

This is a complete (and probably wrong) guess. Please correct me!

BFGUITAR
07-18-2007, 08:33 PM
I dont want an exact percentage but a general area.

eddie500
07-19-2007, 06:02 AM
Good question, I always wonderered about this myself.

It seems that the body absorbs different amounts depending on circumstances. THat is why when people go on a deit and don't eat they don't really loose much weight because the body is supposedly hording all the calories.

I also think your body wants to keep a optimal size and weight, so in order for us hardgainers/skinny people to gain we have to really force in a lot of food.

I don't think anyone really knows for sure about this. Most think that if you eat 3000 calories your body absorbs 3000calories.

ShockBoxer
07-19-2007, 06:36 AM
As long as you're consistantly gaining, maintaining, or losing on a set amount of calories it doesn't matter if you're absorbing the full 3000 of them or 1200.

I've given this a fair amount of thought because I have massive digestion problems. My maintenance is 1800 calories. It's also 2400 calories. I've done both, measured the results (nothing) on both. If I want to lose I have to drop to 14 or 1500. If I want to gain I have to go to more than 3000. A six hundred calorie maintenance window is far too drastic for a healthy adult, in my opinion... it's fully a quarter of the daily recommended calories.

I wouldn't be surprised to learn that my body is inefficient at breaking material down as it passes through the intestines and that a decent amount of nutrients make it through undigested, which is NOT how things work in a normal person.

But at the end of the day results trump all. I cut 40 pounds on 1500 in six months (including the two months at the beginning where I cut 0 pounds on 1800), and I bulked 5 pound on 3000 in two.

So eat your 3000 and see what happens and adjust accordingly.

JustLost
07-19-2007, 07:02 AM
As long as you're consistantly gaining, maintaining, or losing on a set amount of calories it doesn't matter if you're absorbing the full 3000 of them or 1200.

...

But at the end of the day results trump all. I cut 40 pounds on 1500 in six months (including the two months at the beginning where I cut 0 pounds on 1800), and I bulked 5 pound on 3000 in two.

So eat your 3000 and see what happens and adjust accordingly.

+1.

It always comes back to fine tuning by trial and error.

greekboy80
07-19-2007, 08:04 AM
Yeah it's just trial and error, but from what I have heard in most of my classes and through research is that about 99% of evreything you eat is absorbed. Some circ. it does bypass absorption, i.e. diareah(sp?), stomach infection, etc. But, your body is a fine tuned machiene that leaves nothing to waste. Whatever you put in, it will absorb and not let anything go to waste.

Holto
07-19-2007, 10:12 AM
The human body has evolved over hundreds of millions of years to survive. We are incredibly efficient at absorbing energy.

Any cals not absorbed would have seriously challenged our ability to survive.

That said when you track cals to determine maintenance cals you are tracking your INTAKE.

Meaning that if you ingest 3000 cals and maintain that is your maintenance intake, even if you are hypothetically only absorbing 50% of the cals.

The only exception would be if you were tracking foods that were absorbed at a low rate and then switched to foods that absorbed at a hight rate. Luckily given how efficient our digestion a large disparity in absorption is impossible.