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Thread: Squat Rx Videos

  1. #26
    Iron4Life
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    Man Sensei... I didn't think your vids could get any better... Awesome job..
    here are a couple of questions for you:
    --On my heavy (>80%) box squats, I can not seem to release my hip flexors unless I rock back a little at the bottom on the box. I can keep the back straight/flexed and shoot straight up on less, but when heavy, nope. You see a problem with this as long as I keep everything tight?
    --what % on the Pause Squats and what kind of time? I've worked myself up to 225 x 3 reps x 5 secs each. (225 is about 47%) And not that it is hard, but I worry that the TUT at the bottom (b/c I pause at rock bottom) is going to stretch or damage the knee. Can these be built up to a high % of max?
    --also, what % on the O-I SQs? I've always loved these, but never knew a name for them.lol but i like to do 135(28%) x 5 or 185(39%) x 3 for sets...

    Checking out that Inno-sport website too.. sounds interesting.

    BTW.. I agree with your twisting ideas.. but can you point me to these comments by Boyle and sahrman so I can see what they are saying? tx..

  2. #27
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearwolf View Post
    Man Sensei... I didn't think your vids could get any better... Awesome job..
    here are a couple of questions for you:
    --On my heavy (>80%) box squats, I can not seem to release my hip flexors unless I rock back a little at the bottom on the box. I can keep the back straight/flexed and shoot straight up on less, but when heavy, nope. You see a problem with this as long as I keep everything tight?
    Thanks big man!
    No, I think that the heavier and/or lower you go, there's just going to have to be a little rocking. Kind of like the pelvic tilt at the bottom of the squat, I don't know if it can be avoided completely, but it something to pay close attention to.
    --what % on the Pause Squats and what kind of time? I've worked myself up to 225 x 3 reps x 5 secs each. (225 is about 47%) And not that it is hard, but I worry that the TUT at the bottom (b/c I pause at rock bottom) is going to stretch or damage the knee. Can these be built up to a high % of max?
    Here's my take on pause squats Bear: IMHO, the major difference between a box squat and a pause squat is that you shouldn't be relaxing at all in any way in the hole - maintain that isometric contraction. Going rock bottom is going to tempt you into doing just that (relaxing, that is). I would stop just short of rock bottom - it will probably benefit you more with less potential risk.
    Time at the bottom is something I probably should have reviewed before making the video - you are probably going to have some stretch reflex at the bottom of a box and pause squat unless you sat there way longer than is safe, but the longer the pause, the less reflex. Like I said in the vid though, IMO there are safety issues that probably preclude someone sitting at the bottom for, say, 10 seconds - I think a little can go a long way with these and a pause for 3 seconds can seem like a minute if you are using a heavy weight.
    --also, what % on the O-I SQs? I've always loved these, but never knew a name for them.lol but i like to do 135(28%) x 5 or 185(39%) x 3 for sets...
    I think that form and trying to achieve relaxation/tension are huge with this exercise - don't get too caught up on the weight. Your weights sound pretty reasonable to me.
    I realized that there should have been more of a pause at the top of the squat soon after filming (so, I was essentially leaving out the "isometric" in the "oscillatory isometric"...). What I was doing was more of a oscillatory-reactive squat actually. Anyway, it's a great exercise performed the way I demonstrated or with the pause at the top of the movement. I'll need to post a correction there.
    [qoute=Bearwolf]BTW.. I agree with your twisting ideas.. but can you point me to these comments by Boyle and sahrman so I can see what they are saying? tx..[/QUOTE]http://michaelboyle.biz/documents/ar...0Necessary.pdf Also, that Sahrmann book I linked earlier. I'll be buying that soon.
    Last edited by Sensei; 08-12-2007 at 12:57 PM.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  3. #28
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Squat Rx #14: 7 "Core" Exercises
    Video
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  4. #29
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Squat Rx #15: The Front Squat
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3NRmdtSvmQQ
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  5. #30
    Wannabebig Member Biohazard101's Avatar
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    another great video, thanks a lot Sensei!

  6. #31
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    With regards to obliques movement on the lat pull down in your core exercise video, is there an advantage to using an inflexible item such as the one you made specifically as opposed to using the rope attachment for the lat pull down?

    Do you have an opinion on Roman Chair sit ups as an ab exercise?

  7. #32
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanOz View Post
    With regards to obliques movement on the lat pull down in your core exercise video, is there an advantage to using an inflexible item such as the one you made specifically as opposed to using the rope attachment for the lat pull down?
    It kind of depends on how you hold it, but you can transfer power from your bottom hand with a stick - you can't with a rope.

    Do you have an opinion on Roman Chair sit ups as an ab exercise?
    I like them, but it's a tough exercise if you don't have some strong and flexible hip flexors. A lot of people do it (and regular sit-ups for that matter) wrong and end up writhing on the floor w. back spasms...
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  8. #33
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Squat Rx #16: The Hack Squat
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PLgPJVwemtU
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  9. #34
    Senior Member KoolDrew's Avatar
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    Wow, looks like you've made about 10 new ones since the last time I watched one. Keep up the great work!

  10. #35
    Wannabebig Member Biohazard101's Avatar
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    I am going to a BBQ. I will check out #16 tonight, again good job on those videos Sensei, there are people on T-Nation watching and learning from your videos.

  11. #36
    GFH Lones Green's Avatar
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    i just watched 5 of these. i'm going to go hit the weights, then watch the others when i get home. thanks sensei.
    23 years old
    6'3, 308 lbs

    825 Squat
    470 Bench
    645 Deadlift
    1905 total
    www.atlargenutrition.com

  12. #37
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Glad you guys are getting something out of them. Let me know if you'd like to see certain topics covered.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  13. #38
    Wannabebig Member Biohazard101's Avatar
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    I would like to learn more on the deadlift form.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei View Post
    Squat Rx #16: The Hack Squat
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PLgPJVwemtU
    What would be the advantage of doing a hack squat over a trap bar deadlift? In my opinion, a trap bar deadlift enables you to maintain a better lower back posture while maintaining the benefits of a hack squat. Is there some advantage to the hack squat comparitively that I haven't considered?

  15. #40
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Well, I agree with you about the trap bar deadlift/squat being easier on your lower back... I don't have anything at all against the trap bar but here's my thing with them: I've never seen a lot of carry-over to anything (squats, deadlifts, and really even athletics) with them - maybe other coaches/athletes have, I don't know, but I haven't.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  16. #41
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biohazard101 View Post
    I would like to learn more on the deadlift form.
    I'm not the best deadlifter, but I've been talking with a friend and we're planning to work together on some things for the deadlift - he lives a hundred miles away, so it might be a while though...
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei View Post
    Well, I agree with you about the trap bar deadlift/squat being easier on your lower back... I don't have anything at all against the trap bar but here's my thing with them: I've never seen a lot of carry-over to anything (squats, deadlifts, and really even athletics) with them - maybe other coaches/athletes have, I don't know, but I haven't.
    But with the hack squat you have seen a carry over, is that what you are saying?

  18. #43
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanOz View Post
    But with the hack squat you have seen a carry over, is that what you are saying?
    Dan,
    I don't know, maybe it's me, but the way you ask a question....

    I, personally (or the kids I've worked with), have never spent enough time with hack squats to give you definate yes or no, but I think as a supplemental they have a lot more promise than the trap bar (which I have definately spent more than enough time with through BFS...).
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  19. #44
    Magically Delicious redFury's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei View Post
    Glad you guys are getting something out of them. Let me know if you'd like to see certain topics covered.
    I'd love to see some stuff on some olympic lifts... you're a great online teacher and most of the vids I've seen on them are borderline worthless. If you would put up something of practice form such as push unders etc that would be awesome!
    - rEDfURY
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  20. #45
    Senior Member noahfor123's Avatar
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    These videos are a huge help - definitely a gem of the online training discussion world.

    I know you are getting tons of requests for videos, and you're probably pretty busy with other things, but I'm just going to go ahead and say that a video on good mornings would be pretty great.
    The Iron never lies to you. The Iron will always kick you the real deal. It never freaks out on me, never runs. Friends may come and go, but 200 pounds is always 200 pounds - a warm-up.

  21. #46
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Red,
    These videos I thought were great:
    http://youtube.com/watch?v=Y2ZV4gE0eUE
    http://youtube.com/watch?v=uHB1r5Lo5iU

    Noah,
    I know I talk about GMs in more than one of the videos. It's at about 4:30 in this video (Squat Rx #3: http://youtube.com/watch?v=uHB1r5Lo5iU )
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  22. #47
    Senior Member noahfor123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei View Post
    Noah,
    I know I talk about GMs in more than one of the videos. It's at about 4:30 in this video (Squat Rx #3: http://youtube.com/watch?v=uHB1r5Lo5iU )
    Thanks.
    The Iron never lies to you. The Iron will always kick you the real deal. It never freaks out on me, never runs. Friends may come and go, but 200 pounds is always 200 pounds - a warm-up.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei View Post
    Dan,
    I don't know, maybe it's me, but the way you ask a question....
    I think we have a communication problem here mate. I was trying to clarify your meaning so that I understood you correctly, nothing more.

    So don't take offense at my next question -

    Is a carry over benefit for any exercise really important? What I mean to say, if a trap bar deadlift does not have a carry over benefit to squats, regular deadlifting etc, does this really matter? Isn't the point of doing any exercise to get the benefits from THAT particular exercise, continual progress in that movement? If you wanted to improve squats or regular deadlifts, then you would perform those movements.
    Last edited by DanOz; 09-04-2007 at 07:32 PM.

  24. #49
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    WOW! Just got off the phone with Mark Rippetoe - WHAT A FREAKING AWESOME GUY! We talked for an hour about form and lifting. Some of our time was talking about articles, interviews, etc. that he had done in the past, some of it about his book that's about to come out, and some of it about coaching in general.

    The cool thing is that here's a guy that's probably busy as hell with books, articles, forums, seminars, and his own gym and he makes time to sit down to talk with a high school teacher/coach for AN HOUR about form. To top it off, in his own words, he's "not very good at typing"... Seriously, what a great coach.

    I'd try to write down a summary of what we talked about, but it'll take a while. As far as the Squat Rx vids are concerned, he did question the use of certain drills/exercises to correct lower back rounding and I agreed with him 100% on his assessments. There are definately some exercises/drills that I included in some videos that would have been more appropriately placed elsewhere or discarded because they would be of marginal use to squatting or the issues in question - for example, the wall squat = probably a good drill for learning the front squat, but probably not the best for learning how to low bar squat properly.

    Anywho, I'm just blown away by the guy. Lots of fun to talk to him and I hope to again someday at a seminar or at his gym.

    Boris
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  25. #50
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanOz View Post
    Is a carry over benefit for any exercise really important? What I mean to say, if a trap bar deadlift does not have a carry over benefit to squats, regular deadlifting etc, does this really matter? Isn't the point of doing any exercise to get the benefits from THAT particular exercise, continual progress in that movement? If you wanted to improve squats or regular deadlifts, then you would perform those movements.
    That's an interesting question Dan, but I guess I would turn that around and say if there is minimal carry over to other things, what good is it really?

    I'm sure that there are plenty of coaches who swear by the trap bar DL/SQ and I'm not saying they are all wrong and I'm right, but I, personally, just haven't seen the carry-over to other lifts and athletics to warrant spending much time with it. I've seen too many kids who could load a trap bar with 400+ lbs and rep out with it, yet couldn't do a proper barbell DL or SQ w. half that. So, should I just say "Well, maybe they're gifted at trapbar DLs. Let's just take the ball and run with it!" and continue to pump up their trapbar #s because they get an egoboost and feel damn strong, or should I work on their weaknesses and try to improve their strength and coordination with something else?

    Anyway, I'm not really anti-trapbar. I know it sounds like I am, but I'm not - maybe I just haven't learned how to incorporate it effectively yet... Just my thoughts.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

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