The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
    Senior Member brihead301's Avatar
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    The new rules of lifting

    How ya'll doin. This is my first post in this forum. I figured I'd just introduce myself by talking about my routine that I'm doing right now.

    I'm doing the "new rules of lifting" routine(s). This is honestly the best program I have ever followed before. Every workout is based primarily on compound movements, no isolations, and each workout has a different set/rep/weight/rest range. The results are amazing so far. I'm about to start the "strength" portion of the program in one month from now. I'm almost finished with the first two "hypertrophy" portions.

    I'll post my routine in another thread, but for now I'm just introducing myself and trying to find out who else is doing the new rules of lifting routine.

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  3. #2
    cakin Cirino83's Avatar
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    Welcome to the boards. Do you have a link to this routine? I've never heard of it.

  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by brihead301 View Post
    How ya'll doin. This is my first post in this forum. I figured I'd just introduce myself by talking about my routine that I'm doing right now.

    I'm doing the "new rules of lifting" routine(s). This is honestly the best program I have ever followed before. Every workout is based primarily on compound movements, no isolations, and each workout has a different set/rep/weight/rest range. The results are amazing so far. I'm about to start the "strength" portion of the program in one month from now. I'm almost finished with the first two "hypertrophy" portions.

    I'll post my routine in another thread, but for now I'm just introducing myself and trying to find out who else is doing the new rules of lifting routine.
    Welcome. Always love learning about new routines. Love keeping the body in a WTF?! state.

  5. #4
    Senior Member brihead301's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cirino83 View Post
    Welcome to the boards. Do you have a link to this routine? I've never heard of it.
    It's actually not just one single routine. It's a book written by Lou Schiller and Alwyn Cosgrove. It's by far the best weight lifting book I ever read, simply because it makes sense and it applies to anyone - beginners, intermediate, advanced, people trying to lose weight, people trying to get bigger, etc.....

    I got the book out of the library about a month ago, and I put all the routines into excel spreadsheets.

    There are 3 hypertrophy specific routines, 3 fat-loss routines, and 3 strength routines. I'm almost finished the 2nd hypertrophy routine, and I'm about to start the 1st strength routine in one month.

    Here's an example of what strength 1 looks like:

    Day 1 - Squat strength

    Squat - 6 sets total
    set 1 - 6 reps
    set 2 - 1 rep
    set 3 - 6 reps
    set 4 - 1 rep
    set 5 - 12 reps
    set 6 - 20 reps

    Bulgarian split squat supersetted
    with weighted step-ups

    3 x 15 (no rest between supersets)

    Back Extention supersetted with
    Swiss ball crunch


    3 x 15 (no rest between supersets)



    Day 2 - Horizantal Push/pull strength

    Barbell benchpress - 5 sets total
    set 1 - 6 reps
    set 2 - 1 rep
    set 3 - 6 reps
    set 4 - 1 rep
    set 5 - 12 reps

    Barbell row - 5 sets total
    set 1 - 6 reps
    set 2 - 1 rep
    set 3 - 6 reps
    set 4 - 1 rep
    set 5 - 12 reps

    Close grip lat pulldown supersetted with
    Dumbell shoulder press

    2 x 8 (full rest between supersets)

    Lower body russian twist
    2 x 10



    Day 3 - Deadlift strength

    Deadlift - 6 sets total
    set 1 - 6 reps
    set 2 - 1 rep
    set 3 - 6 reps
    set 4 - 1 rep
    set 5 - 12 reps
    set 6 - 20 reps

    SLDL supersetted
    with static lunge

    3 x 10 (no rest between supersets)

    Good mornings supersetted with
    incline reverse crunch


    2 x 10 (no rest between supersets)


    Day 4 - vertical push/pull strength

    Weighted chin-ups - 5 sets total
    set 1 - 6 reps
    set 2 - 1 rep
    set 3 - 6 reps
    set 4 - 1 rep
    set 5 - 12 reps

    Military press - 5 sets total
    set 1 - 6 reps
    set 2 - 1 rep
    set 3 - 6 reps
    set 4 - 1 rep
    set 5 - 12 reps

    Dumbell bench press supersetted with
    wide-grip seated row

    2 x 8 (full rest between supersets)

    Lower body russian twist
    2 x 10


    This is a strength routine based on "wave-loading", meaning that the 6 rep, 1 rep, 6 rep, 1 rep thing is supposed to trick the body into heavier lifts. For instance for squats, you start with 6 reps of say 200 lbs, then you do 1 rep of 240 lbs, then you do 6 more reps of say 225 lbs., then 1 rep of say 270 lbs. The second set of 6 reps should feel just as easy as the first set because you just got done doing 1 heavy rep. Then the second 1 rep set should feel about the same as the first 1 rep set, because you just got done doing a heavier 6 rep set prior to it. The high rep set(s) at the end of the wave-loading is just to completely exhaust the muscle, inducing more growth and endurance. It sounds a bit confusing, but if you think about it it makes sense.

    Each week I plan on increasing the 1-rep sets by a few lbs. and therefore increasing my 1RM for each type of lift by the end of the routine. I think this routine will help build new mass too.

    The hypertrophy routines look completely different. They change sets/reps/rest times every time you go to the gym in order to work all types of muscle fibers. The hypertrophy routines basically just consist of compound lifts, and you cycle through 5x5, 3x15, and 4x10 in Hypertrophy 1. Hypertrophy 2 is similar, but has different exercises and set/rep ranges.

    Basically, it's the strength routines that really caught my eye. They look really good, and I can't wait to get started on it. I have a feeling that the strength routines are going to get me much bigger then any other routine I ever did before, even though the main focus is strength, not size.

    Any thoughts?

  6. #5
    cakin Cirino83's Avatar
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    Hmm the sample routine you posted looks pretty good. I might give this book a look. Thanks. I'm bulking right now, so I want a hypertrophy based routine. If your looking for future strength routines, just search around this section of the forum, there are a lot of good ones around.
    Last edited by Cirino83; 09-10-2007 at 02:16 PM.

  7. #6
    Senior Member brihead301's Avatar
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    The hypertrophy routines in that book are great too. I gained about 20 lbs in the 4 1/2 months that I've been doing it so far (Maybe not all lean mass, but I'm still happy with my body fat level). I don't know if the strength routine(s) are going to give me the same gains in size as the hypertrophy programs, but I'll let everyone know once I give it a shot.

    The main point of the book that the author is trying to make is that strength training is the best thing you can do for your body. You get stronger - you get bigger muscles - you get bigger muscles, you are able to burn fat much easier.

  8. #7
    indomitable will.
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    Quote Originally Posted by brihead301 View Post
    The hypertrophy routines in that book are great too.
    I've read a lot of Cosgrove's stuff... seems like a smart enough guy.

    I don't want you to have to retype the whole book here or anything, but I'm curious to see what the hypertrophy routines look like. (although apparently not quite curious enough to actually go buy the book. )

    Any sort of general outline would be perfectly fine, if you feel like it, of course.

  9. #8
    Breaker of Skulls Guido's Avatar
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    I've got that book and my father-in-law read it and follows the routines outlined in there religiously. It's definitely a good read and Alwyn Cosgrove and Lou Schuler definitely know their stuff.
    5'9" 195 lbs
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  10. #9
    Senior Member brihead301's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Outshine View Post
    I've read a lot of Cosgrove's stuff... seems like a smart enough guy.

    I don't want you to have to retype the whole book here or anything, but I'm curious to see what the hypertrophy routines look like. (although apparently not quite curious enough to actually go buy the book. )

    Any sort of general outline would be perfectly fine, if you feel like it, of course.
    Here's what hypertrophy 1 looks like.

    It's an upper body/lower body split.

    upper body
    - Incline dumbell bench press superset with wide grip pull-downs (or pull-ups on heavy days)
    - Dumbell shoulder press superset with cable seated rows
    - Close grip flat barbell press superset with one arm dumbell rows
    - swiss ball crunches

    Lower body - barbell squat superset with barbell deadlift
    - lunges superset with step-up (onto a platform that is about 3' high, with the same weight as for the lunges)
    - reverse crunches

    BUT Here's the fun part, the KEY to cosgrove's programs:

    I alternate between upper body and lower body every time I go to the gym, and I stick to the Heavy - moderate - light cycle. So it looks like:

    Monday: Heavy upper body
    sets of 5x5 with 90 seconds of rest between sets, 85% max weight

    Thrusday: Moderate lower body
    sets of 4 x 10 with 60 seconds of rest between sets, 75% max weight

    Saturday: Light upper body
    sets of 3 x 15 with 30 seconds of rest between sets, 60% max weight

    Monday: Heavy lower body
    sets of 5x5 with 90 seconds of rest between sets, 85% max weight

    Thrusday: Moderate upper body
    sets of 4 x 10 with 60 seconds of rest between sets, 75% max weight

    Saturday: Light lower body
    sets of 3 x 15 with 30 seconds of rest between sets, 60% max weight

    And then the cycle repeats itself. The trick is that every time I go to the gym I get slammed with a different type of intensity. Extremely heavy days with long rest, "light" days with barely any rest (makes me want to puke), and "moderate" days with moderate rest (for a good all around kick in the a**).

    Seriously this is one INTENSE program, if you stick to the rest times, and push yourself each week to go a little heavier with the weights. I never had gains like I did until I did this routine.
    Last edited by brihead301; 09-10-2007 at 09:58 PM.

  11. #10
    Senior Member smalls's Avatar
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    I personally think using superset protocols on every workout and every bodypart is limiting the superseted muscle from being as strong as it would be done with rest. (your fatigued before even hitting that muscle group) Thus limiting progress, hypertrophy etc.

    I mean supersetting squats with deadlifts? I love the idea of heavy days and light days, which is what I do in my own routine. I work every muscle group every 5 days, once heavy low reps, one higher reps. Simply because it keeps things interesting. I just think this is overcomplicating simple things. And fat loss routines? Give us an example. Cuz that just sound futarded.

    And the whole idea of keeping the body guessing by switching things up has been gone over here enough times so i'll just keep it to this. Making progress with more weight or reps is the only "switch up" your body really needs to adapt to.

    Quote Originally Posted by Outshine View Post

    Any sort of general outline would be perfectly fine, if you feel like it, of course.

    This is how I feel about these overdetailed routines, but if you like em then that's what it's all about.
    Last edited by smalls; 09-11-2007 at 01:16 AM.
    Diet is key, the calorie is king

    "Most folks are about as happy as they make up their minds to be."
    --Abraham Lincoln

    "Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent.
    Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination
    alone are omnipotent. The slogan 'press on' has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race."
    Calvin Coolidge (1872-1933)
    30th U.S. President

    "If you want to look abnormal you have to eat abnormal,lol."--ST

  12. #11
    Senior Member brihead301's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by smalls View Post
    I personally think using superset protocols on every workout and every bodypart is limiting the superseted muscle from being as strong as it would be done with rest. (your fatigued before even hitting that muscle group) Thus limiting progress, hypertrophy etc.

    I mean supersetting squats with deadlifts? I love the idea of heavy days and light days, which is what I do in my own routine. I work every muscle group every 5 days, once heavy low reps, one higher reps. Simply because it keeps things interesting. I just think this is overcomplicating simple things. And fat loss routines? Give us an example. Cuz that just sound futarded.

    And the whole idea of keeping the body guessing by switching things up has been gone over here enough times so i'll just keep it to this. Making progress with more weight or reps is the only "switch up" your body really needs to adapt to.




    This is how I feel about these overdetailed routines, but if you like em then that's what it's all about.
    I apologize, it's actually not supersetting squats with deadlifts. You do the squats for the designated amount of reps and sets, then you do the deadlifts afterwards for all the sets.

    About the supersets in general. All the supersets in that routine that I posted (hypertrophy 1), are full rest supersets. For example, that means if it's a 'heavy day' you would do 5 reps of incline bench press, rest 90 seconds, then do 5 reps of cable seated rows, then rest again for 90 seconds. That's one superset. You do the same thing for the "light" and "moderate" days, only the rest times are 30 seconds, and 60 seconds in between.

    Anyway, this is a hypertrophy routine, not a strength based routine, which is why full recovery between sets is not necessary. This routine has induced more muscle growth then I have ever seen before in my 6 years of lifting, simply because I have never felt a pump and pure exhaustion like this before. Give it a shot, I guarantee you'll be amazed by the results.

    I haven't tried the strength routine(s) yet, so I can't say how good the results are. I'll be sure to let you all know. All I know is I'm 4 months into his programs (hypertrophy 1 completed, and hypertrophy 2 almost completed), and these gains are just like newb gains. The hypertrophy workouts are amazing.

    Here's an example of one of his fat loss routines (it's part of fat loss 3):

    Deadlift 12 reps, no rest afterwards
    Explosive push-up 12 reps, no rest afterwards
    Bulgarian Split-squat 12 reps, no rest afterwards
    Dumbell row 12 reps, rest for 60 seconds
    REPEAT 4 TIMES

    Deadlift off box 20 reps, no rest afterwards
    Dumbell bench press 20 reps, no rest afterwards
    Walking lunge with side bend 20 reps, no rest afterwards
    Cable seated row 20 reps, rest for 60 seconds
    REPEAT 2 TIMES

    Hanging leg raise 2 x 10

    It's very INEFFICIENT meaning your body can't efficiently use it's energy (calories) to complete the task at hand. This inefficiency means more calories burned. An example of an efficient superset would be something like side lateral raises supersetted with front raises. In that case you're body would use just enough calories to supply you with energy in your shoulders to complete the task at hand, therefore not as many calories are used.

    BTW, that theory is taken directly from the book, and my explanation doesn't do it any justice.

    "Fat loss" routines are not retarted, they are just routines that burn a ton of calories. Essentially it's cardio with weights.

    Last point I'm going to make about this book. You say not to overcomplicate things, well this book is about as simplified as it gets. It's all based on 6 basic movements - Squat, deadlift, push, pull, lunge, and twist. There are no isolation exercises, because he doesn't think in terms of "body parts" such as back or chest or arms, etc....Every exercise is based on those 6 basic movements, which are all real-life functional movements.

    Good stuff.

  13. #12
    indomitable will.
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    Interesting, and it pretty much fits the stuff of he's written about before that I've read. Thanks for writing it up.

  14. #13
    Senior Member smalls's Avatar
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    I apologize, it's actually not supersetting squats with deadlifts. You do the squats for the designated amount of reps and sets, then you do the deadlifts afterwards for all the sets.

    About the supersets in general. All the supersets in that routine that I posted (hypertrophy 1), are full rest supersets. For example, that means if it's a 'heavy day' you would do 5 reps of incline bench press, rest 90 seconds, then do 5 reps of cable seated rows, then rest again for 90 seconds. That's one superset. You do the same thing for the "light" and "moderate" days, only the rest times are 30 seconds, and 60 seconds in between.
    This makes more sense. IMO.

    Anyway, this is a hypertrophy routine, not a strength based routine, which is why full recovery between sets is not necessary. This routine has induced more muscle growth then I have ever seen before in my 6 years of lifting, simply because I have never felt a pump and pure exhaustion like this before. Give it a shot, I guarantee you'll be amazed by the results.
    But since when is the pump and pure exhaustion the keys to hypertrophy, strength or not rest is still beneficial for making progress and progress is the key to everything in life, including hypertrophy. I understand the point of short rest periods but again, doing an entire workout with 30 second intervals, unless that's the way you train and are used to it just diminshes strength and increases overal fatigue.

    I haven't tried the strength routine(s) yet, so I can't say how good the results are. I'll be sure to let you all know. All I know is I'm 4 months into his programs (hypertrophy 1 completed, and hypertrophy 2 almost completed), and these gains are just like newb gains. The hypertrophy workouts are amazing.
    Here's an example of one of his fat loss routines (it's part of fat loss 3):

    U]Deadlift[/U] 12 reps, no rest afterwards
    Explosive push-up 12 reps, no rest afterwards
    Bulgarian Split-squat 12 reps, no rest afterwards
    Dumbell row 12 reps, rest for 60 seconds
    REPEAT 4 TIMES

    Deadlift off box 20 reps, no rest afterwards
    Dumbell bench press 20 reps, no rest afterwards
    Walking lunge with side bend 20 reps, no rest afterwards
    Cable seated row 20 reps, rest for 60 seconds
    REPEAT 2 TIMES

    Hanging leg raise 2 x 10

    It's very INEFFICIENT meaning your body can't efficiently use it's energy (calories) to complete the task at hand. This inefficiency means more calories burned. An example of an efficient superset would be something like side lateral raises supersetted with front raises. In that case you're body would use just enough calories to supply you with energy in your shoulders to complete the task at hand, therefore not as many calories are used.
    BTW, that theory is taken directly from the book, and my explanation doesn't do it any justice.

    "Fat loss" routines are not retarted, they are just routines that burn a ton of calories. Essentially it's cardio with weights.
    Yeah it's called circuit training and it's the absolute essence of getting the worst of both worlds. But hey the leanest bodybuilders around do circuit training right, LOL. And not to be rude but your explenation of the "inneficiency" of those supersets doesnt makes sense just like you said so I hope it's very different in the book. And yes of course fat loss routines are retared. You just stated how amazing the hypertrophy routine was, best routine you have ever done correct? But now your going to change it up, then change it again to lose fat? So your going to drop the best muscle inducing routine you have ever used and do so at the most catabolic time, why? That doesnt sound retarted at all.

    Last point I'm going to make about this book. You say not to overcomplicate things, well this book is about as simplified as it gets. It's all based on 6 basic movements - Squat, deadlift, push, pull, lunge, and twist. There are no isolation exercises, because he doesn't think in terms of "body parts" such as back or chest or arms, etc....Every exercise is based on those 6 basic movements, which are all real-life functional movements.

    Good stuff.
    I really didnt think my original post was harsh, but you seem to be a little defensive. Sorry If I came of negatively. I personally feel you should go after your goal specifically, and most people goals are attained through a basic progressive routine and then dietary manipulation, diet being 80+% of that. I also personally hate using a standardized routine that someone else came up with. I find I have to have total control and enjoy myself more when I designed the routine myself. But obviously that's just me. This routine has yeilded good results for you and that's awesome.
    Last edited by smalls; 09-11-2007 at 11:16 AM.
    Diet is key, the calorie is king

    "Most folks are about as happy as they make up their minds to be."
    --Abraham Lincoln

    "Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent.
    Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination
    alone are omnipotent. The slogan 'press on' has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race."
    Calvin Coolidge (1872-1933)
    30th U.S. President

    "If you want to look abnormal you have to eat abnormal,lol."--ST

  15. #14
    Senior Member Vapour Trails's Avatar
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    Day 3 - Deadlift strength

    Deadlift - 6 sets total
    set 1 - 6 reps
    set 2 - 1 rep
    set 3 - 6 reps
    set 4 - 1 rep
    set 5 - 12 reps
    set 6 - 20 reps


    Beyond stupid
    After you see god on your 20 rep set after you've already done 26 reps, ask him why he hates you.
    Last edited by Vapour Trails; 09-11-2007 at 11:26 AM.
    That's a picture of Scarlett Johansson.

  16. #15
    Senior Member brihead301's Avatar
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    Smalls, without trying to rewrite this whole book (which in my honest opinion is the best weightlifting book I've ever read, and I've read at least 20 cover to cover), I will give you the general explanation of his theories on hypertrophy:

    You can get bigger by doing heavy sets of 5x5.
    You can get bigger by doing light "endurance" sets with high reps and short rest times.
    You can get bigger by lifting with moderately heavy weight with sets of 8-10, where the last rep is very hard to do, and moderate rest times.

    These are the three types of set/rep ranges he uses in the hypertrophy 1 routine. You cycle through them though, as I said. Monday is Heavy upper body day, wednesday is moderate lower body day, friday is light upper body day, next monday is heavy lower body day, wednesday is moderate upper body day, and friday is light lower body day. As you can see when you do "Heavy upper body" on the first monday, you don't actually repeat that workout until 2 weeks later after you've cycled through all the other 5 workouts. By the time you get to "heavy upper body" day, you increase the weights on some of your lifts. This is the same thing for "light upper body" day, and all of the 6 different routines for that matter. Although fridays are the "light days" you're only doing this high rep, short rest thing once every 2 weeks for your upper body, and once every 2 weeks for your lower body.

    The basic principle here is that you're giving your body rest while still lifting. After doing the heavy upper body day, which recruits a certain type of muscle fibers, you don't do that again for 2 weeks, but in the meantime you're still lifting with other set/rep ranges.

    I don't know know if the pump and pure exhaustion are the keys to hypertrophy. Honestly I don't know what the "key" to hypertrophy really is, I don't think anyone really knows the #1 single most important factor in muscle growth is involving set/rep/rest times/amount of weight used. What we all do know is that you lift weights, feed muscles, muscles grow during rest. This switching up the set/rep ranges every week seems to allow for optimal rest, all while working all the different types of muscle fibers, which is probably the reason why this routine has yielded amazing results for me so far.

    Why am I switching my routine after I just got amazing results from it? As I'm sure you know you do need a switch every couple of months once your body adapts to the routine. Also that's what the program says to do. This program is not just one routine, it is a whole years worth of routines. As I said, there are three fat loss programs, three hypertrophy programs, and three strength programs given in this book. They can be mixed and matched as necessary. He does give four sample 52-week programs though. The one I'm doing is called "The guy who considers skinny an insult" (it's a funny book too, which makes it a great read). This program is as follows:

    Hypertrophy 1 - 6 weeks
    1 week off
    Hypertrophy 2 - 8 weeks (this is where I'm at now)
    2 weeks off
    Strength 1 - 4 week (the routine I listed in my first post)
    1 week off
    Strength 2 - 4 weeks
    1 week off
    Hypertrophy 3 - 8 weeks
    1 week off
    Strength 3 - 4 weeks
    1 week off
    Fat loss 2 and 3 consecutively - 4 weeks
    2 weeks off

    Results - bigger, stronger, and leaner.

    I've been lifting for about 6 years now doing the standard push/pull/legs routine, 4-day splits, 5-day splits, full-body, etc.... I'm just saying that this an experiment I'm doing which takes 1 year. 4 months in and it's working FANTASTIC. Like I said, I'm getting newb gains (and I've been at it for over 6 years, so obviously I'm not new at this), it's unbelievable. This guy has his theories, which all make lots of sense, and he has a full body program laid out so I'm giving it a shot, and I'm sharing my thoughts on it with others.

    About the fat-loss thing, mock it all you want but only after you give it a shot. I will be doing the fat-loss programs at the end of 46 weeks of strength and hypertrophy training, but only for 4 weeks just to burn off some fat and show off some of the muscle that I built during the year. No s*** you're not going to look like Ronnie Coleman by doing those routines consistently, that's why I'm not going to be doing them very much. As I said though, he has several sample routines laid out for several types of people. One of them is for seriously overweight people in which they start out with the fat loss programs for a few months, then move on to the strength and hypertrophy programs.

    I did give a bad explanation about the inefficiency thing, but what I do know is that he started out his fat loss chapter by saying "The two biggest enemies for fat loss are efficiency and adaptation". I'm not going to try to get into more detail about that, because I don't want to screw it up. All I know is that this "inefficiency" that he speaks of means burning more calories.

    And dude, believe me I didn't think you were being harsh in your original post. It's just that I have a boring ass desk job, so I can sit here and write novel long posts all day just to kill time. In all honesty though, this is the best book about lifting I ever read, and even if I do sway away from his 52-week plan, I still learned lots of good stuff, so I will most definately incorporate the ideas into my own routines that I design myself.

    Check it out sometime if you want. I got it from the library, so it didn't even cost me a dime. It's probably contains the least amount "******ed" things involving weight lifting that could be compiled into one book, seriously.

  17. #16
    Senior Member brihead301's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vapour Trails View Post
    Day 3 - Deadlift strength

    Deadlift - 6 sets total
    set 1 - 6 reps
    set 2 - 1 rep
    set 3 - 6 reps
    set 4 - 1 rep
    set 5 - 12 reps
    set 6 - 20 reps


    Beyond stupid
    After you see god on your 20 rep set after you've already done 26 reps, ask him why he hates you.
    Lol, I hope I do see GOD from this routine, I'll know I got a good workout that day. I'll post pics when I'm done.

    God doesn't hate me, he loves me. That's why he allowed me to come across this amazing deadlift routine.

  18. #17
    Senior Member Vapour Trails's Avatar
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    Alwyn cosgrove is highly ridiculed BTW.
    That's a picture of Scarlett Johansson.

  19. #18
    Senior Member smalls's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brihead301 View Post
    Smalls, without trying to rewrite this whole book (which in my honest opinion is the best weightlifting book I've ever read, and I've read at least 20 cover to cover), I will give you the general explanation of his theories on hypertrophy:

    You can get bigger by doing heavy sets of 5x5.
    You can get bigger by doing light "endurance" sets with high reps and short rest times.
    You can get bigger by lifting with moderately heavy weight with sets of 8-10, where the last rep is very hard to do, and moderate rest times.

    These are the three types of set/rep ranges he uses in the hypertrophy 1 routine. You cycle through them though, as I said. Monday is Heavy upper body day, wednesday is moderate lower body day, friday is light upper body day, next monday is heavy lower body day, wednesday is moderate upper body day, and friday is light lower body day. As you can see when you do "Heavy upper body" on the first monday, you don't actually repeat that workout until 2 weeks later after you've cycled through all the other 5 workouts. By the time you get to "heavy upper body" day, you increase the weights on some of your lifts. This is the same thing for "light upper body" day, and all of the 6 different routines for that matter. Although fridays are the "light days" you're only doing this high rep, short rest thing once every 2 weeks for your upper body, and once every 2 weeks for your lower body.

    The basic principle here is that you're giving your body rest while still lifting. After doing the heavy upper body day, which recruits a certain type of muscle fibers, you don't do that again for 2 weeks, but in the meantime you're still lifting with other set/rep ranges.

    I don't know know if the pump and pure exhaustion are the keys to hypertrophy. Honestly I don't know what the "key" to hypertrophy really is, I don't think anyone really knows the #1 single most important factor in muscle growth is involving set/rep/rest times/amount of weight used. What we all do know is that you lift weights, feed muscles, muscles grow during rest. This switching up the set/rep ranges every week seems to allow for optimal rest, all while working all the different types of muscle fibers, which is probably the reason why this routine has yielded amazing results for me so far.

    Why am I switching my routine after I just got amazing results from it? As I'm sure you know you do need a switch every couple of months once your body adapts to the routine. Also that's what the program says to do. This program is not just one routine, it is a whole years worth of routines. As I said, there are three fat loss programs, three hypertrophy programs, and three strength programs given in this book. They can be mixed and matched as necessary. He does give four sample 52-week programs though. The one I'm doing is called "The guy who considers skinny an insult" (it's a funny book too, which makes it a great read). This program is as follows:

    Hypertrophy 1 - 6 weeks
    1 week off
    Hypertrophy 2 - 8 weeks (this is where I'm at now)
    2 weeks off
    Strength 1 - 4 week (the routine I listed in my first post)
    1 week off
    Strength 2 - 4 weeks
    1 week off
    Hypertrophy 3 - 8 weeks
    1 week off
    Strength 3 - 4 weeks
    1 week off
    Fat loss 2 and 3 consecutively - 4 weeks
    2 weeks off

    Results - bigger, stronger, and leaner.

    I've been lifting for about 6 years now doing the standard push/pull/legs routine, 4-day splits, 5-day splits, full-body, etc.... I'm just saying that this an experiment I'm doing which takes 1 year. 4 months in and it's working FANTASTIC. Like I said, I'm getting newb gains (and I've been at it for over 6 years, so obviously I'm not new at this), it's unbelievable. This guy has his theories, which all make lots of sense, and he has a full body program laid out so I'm giving it a shot, and I'm sharing my thoughts on it with others.

    About the fat-loss thing, mock it all you want but only after you give it a shot. I will be doing the fat-loss programs at the end of 46 weeks of strength and hypertrophy training, but only for 4 weeks just to burn off some fat and show off some of the muscle that I built during the year. No s*** you're not going to look like Ronnie Coleman by doing those routines consistently, that's why I'm not going to be doing them very much. As I said though, he has several sample routines laid out for several types of people. One of them is for seriously overweight people in which they start out with the fat loss programs for a few months, then move on to the strength and hypertrophy programs.

    I did give a bad explanation about the inefficiency thing, but what I do know is that he started out his fat loss chapter by saying "The two biggest enemies for fat loss are efficiency and adaptation". I'm not going to try to get into more detail about that, because I don't want to screw it up. All I know is that this "inefficiency" that he speaks of means burning more calories.

    And dude, believe me I didn't think you were being harsh in your original post. It's just that I have a boring ass desk job, so I can sit here and write novel long posts all day just to kill time. In all honesty though, this is the best book about lifting I ever read, and even if I do sway away from his 52-week plan, I still learned lots of good stuff, so I will most definately incorporate the ideas into my own routines that I design myself.

    Check it out sometime if you want. I got it from the library, so it didn't even cost me a dime. It's probably contains the least amount "******ed" things involving weight lifting that could be compiled into one book, seriously.
    Most of those are basic principles that I agree with. The fat loss thing is still really dumb, using a routine to lose bodyfat is missing the entire point, but whatever. You seem to disagree and that's fine.

    Also, you mentioned a few times about how the different routines hit different types of muscle fibers. You need to do a little more research on this topic, as 1. type 1 fibers will never be fatigued in the above listed routines, they will barely even be touched. And 2. Type 1 fibers have very little potential for size increases and trying to get them to do so is extremely inefficient. 1-15 reps is still targeting fast glycolytic fibers, unless for some reason you are making those 15 reps last 10 minutes.

    Also, you stated that I probably know you need to change a routine every few months so the body doesnt adapt. I know no such thing, I have heard it a million times and it's just as wrong every time. Adaptation is WHAT HYPERTROPHY IS. THAT'S THE GOAL. I change my routine up by doing more weight or more reps. And when I get bored or feel like doing something I will change up one part of my routine. Most of the biggest and strongest people on this planet do basically the exact same type of routein for years at a time, that's why they are where they are. I understand changing your routine for convenience, fun, etc. But if it aint broke, why fix it. You said the routine was awesome, when did it stop being awesome.

    Those are some of the problems I see with the authors idea's. But really overall it's the same basic principles most anyone who succeeds understands. Just a few idea's I think you should read and learn more about so you can be more critical of others idea's and suggestions.
    Diet is key, the calorie is king

    "Most folks are about as happy as they make up their minds to be."
    --Abraham Lincoln

    "Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent.
    Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination
    alone are omnipotent. The slogan 'press on' has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race."
    Calvin Coolidge (1872-1933)
    30th U.S. President

    "If you want to look abnormal you have to eat abnormal,lol."--ST

  20. #19
    Senior Member KoolDrew's Avatar
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    Deadlift - 6 sets total
    set 1 - 6 reps
    set 2 - 1 rep
    set 3 - 6 reps
    set 4 - 1 rep
    set 5 - 12 reps
    set 6 - 20 reps
    20 rep squats I'm okay with, but 20 rep deadlifts? That's 46 reps total!!

  21. #20
    Senior Member brihead301's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vapour Trails View Post
    Alwyn cosgrove is highly ridiculed BTW.
    Ridiculed by who? Also, why?

  22. #21
    Senior Member brihead301's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by smalls View Post
    Most of those are basic principles that I agree with. The fat loss thing is still really dumb, using a routine to lose bodyfat is missing the entire point, but whatever. You seem to disagree and that's fine.

    Also, you mentioned a few times about how the different routines hit different types of muscle fibers. You need to do a little more research on this topic, as 1. type 1 fibers will never be fatigued in the above listed routines, they will barely even be touched. And 2. Type 1 fibers have very little potential for size increases and trying to get them to do so is extremely inefficient. 1-15 reps is still targeting fast glycolytic fibers, unless for some reason you are making those 15 reps last 10 minutes.

    Also, you stated that I probably know you need to change a routine every few months so the body doesnt adapt. I know no such thing, I have heard it a million times and it's just as wrong every time. Adaptation is WHAT HYPERTROPHY IS. THAT'S THE GOAL. I change my routine up by doing more weight or more reps. And when I get bored or feel like doing something I will change up one part of my routine. Most of the biggest and strongest people on this planet do basically the exact same type of routein for years at a time, that's why they are where they are. I understand changing your routine for convenience, fun, etc. But if it aint broke, why fix it. You said the routine was awesome, when did it stop being awesome.

    Those are some of the problems I see with the authors idea's. But really overall it's the same basic principles most anyone who succeeds understands. Just a few idea's I think you should read and learn more about so you can be more critical of others idea's and suggestions.
    I hear what you're saying. The book gives much better explanations on all of what I said, obviously. I probably shouldn't try to repeat what I read in the book without actually having it in front of me, because I'm not exactly clear about all the "science". I did read it, and I have a basic understanding of it, but I'm not knowledgable about it to try and repeat it in the same way he did. All I know is that the idea of changing the sets/reps/weight every workout seems to be what gave me the results. For his actual theories why, you'd be better off reading it for yourself.

    Honestly, if I were to have found this hypertrophy routine 6 months ago, and I gave it a shot, I would probably still be doing it today. But I'm following his 52-week plan where it switches routines every few weeks. I'm not really for or against the fat-loss routines (or the strength routines) because I haven't tried them yet. I'm just putting my faith into what he says simply because what I have done so far (hypertrophy 1 and most of hypertrophy 2) has given me great results. I'm not fat, so I doubt I will ever even get around to doing those routines in the last 4 weeks of his year long program. I'll probably just go back to hypertrophy 1 again.

    "Adaptation is WHAT HYPERTROPHY IS. THAT'S THE GOAL" I think he actaully said that exact quote in the book, so that just goes to show you that my understanding of the science behind hypertrophy is not quite clear.

    I always read weight lifting books with scepticism. I did the same with this book too. In fact, he starts out the book saying "I want you to read this book with scepticism." This MAIN IDEA of this book is not really about why you get bigger or why you get stronger (although he does explain why, and much better then I tried to), but the main idea is that these workouts are based on movements, not individual body parts or muscle groups. Maybe all his theories are not correct, but it is a new way of looking at things and he is pretty convincing.

    It's working great for me so far, and my point of the original post was to encourage people to check out the book.

  23. #22
    Senior Member brihead301's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KoolDrew View Post
    20 rep squats I'm okay with, but 20 rep deadlifts? That's 46 reps total!!
    You do the 6, 1, 6, 1 with heavy weights (the 1 rep sets being max weight), and you go much lighter on the 12 and 20 rep sets. I forget exactly what his explanation is about the 12 and 20 rep sets, but I know it will be hard as hell, and I'll be exhausted by the end. IMO, the harder the workout, the better the workout. I'll definately post the results when I'm finished with this strength routine. I won't be starting it for a few weeks, so it will be 2 months until I'm finished this routine, but I'll surely post before and after pics and lift increases.
    Last edited by brihead301; 09-12-2007 at 07:15 AM.

  24. #23
    Senior Member smalls's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brihead301 View Post
    I hear what you're saying. The book gives much better explanations on all of what I said, obviously. I probably shouldn't try to repeat what I read in the book without actually having it in front of me, because I'm not exactly clear about all the "science". I did read it, and I have a basic understanding of it, but I'm not knowledgable about it to try and repeat it in the same way he did. All I know is that the idea of changing the sets/reps/weight every workout seems to be what gave me the results. For his actual theories why, you'd be better off reading it for yourself.

    Honestly, if I were to have found this hypertrophy routine 6 months ago, and I gave it a shot, I would probably still be doing it today. But I'm following his 52-week plan where it switches routines every few weeks. I'm not really for or against the fat-loss routines (or the strength routines) because I haven't tried them yet. I'm just putting my faith into what he says simply because what I have done so far (hypertrophy 1 and most of hypertrophy 2) has given me great results. I'm not fat, so I doubt I will ever even get around to doing those routines in the last 4 weeks of his year long program. I'll probably just go back to hypertrophy 1 again.

    "Adaptation is WHAT HYPERTROPHY IS. THAT'S THE GOAL" I think he actaully said that exact quote in the book, so that just goes to show you that my understanding of the science behind hypertrophy is not quite clear.

    I always read weight lifting books with scepticism. I did the same with this book too. In fact, he starts out the book saying "I want you to read this book with scepticism." This MAIN IDEA of this book is not really about why you get bigger or why you get stronger (although he does explain why, and much better then I tried to), but the main idea is that these workouts are based on movements, not individual body parts or muscle groups. Maybe all his theories are not correct, but it is a new way of looking at things and he is pretty convincing.

    It's working great for me so far, and my point of the original post was to encourage people to check out the book.

    I think encouraging others do read and research is a great thing, so I applaud that. I'm sure the book is a good read and it seems many people hear would benefit greatly from checking it out, so I hop that they do. Overall it sounds based in good basic principles that have been tried and true and that's what it's all about. Get back to us with more results later, always good to see people succeeding in their goals.
    Diet is key, the calorie is king

    "Most folks are about as happy as they make up their minds to be."
    --Abraham Lincoln

    "Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent.
    Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination
    alone are omnipotent. The slogan 'press on' has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race."
    Calvin Coolidge (1872-1933)
    30th U.S. President

    "If you want to look abnormal you have to eat abnormal,lol."--ST

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