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Thread: I cannot run.

  1. #26
    THUNDER THIGHS! Fuzzy's Avatar
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    I wen from being junior national level rower to puffing from putting weight on the bar.
    Being a strong teenager means nothing.

    My wrists hurt, but some people don't have wrists to be sore. My knees have tendinitis, but some people don't have legs to get tendinitis in. I seem to be going backwards with training, yet some people can't even walk let alone lift 400 pounds on a daily basis.

    Dust out the vagina, and keep on lifting.

  2. #27
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    Its interesting that someone else has this problem. I simply cannot run either.

    Up until I was 14, I just assumed I was really unfit and bad at sport primarily because I couldn't run. Then I started rowing at school and excelled. I was one of the bigger guys in the boat and had excellent stamina.

    My cardiovascular system clearly wasn't the problem as we would do hideously long endurance pieces on both the river and the rowing machine but I would still dread every piece of running we had to do as land training.

    It became somewhat of a joke in the team, where they'd have to put me at the front so I wouldn't get left behind on runs. At one point, I had the second fastest 5000m time on the rowing machine but the slowest running time out of the top two teams. Clearly that shouldn't happen.

    Now at my university, the boat club used to do a 60 minute run every Monday night and I'd still do it and get through it but it was just on pure grit, determination and general physical fitness, rather than any sort of ability at running. I can force myself to run and I can make myself keep going for a fairly long time but it is something that I have never felt to be easy or comfortable. I look sort of weird when running too, so I believe I am fundamentally maladapted to running. I am just lacking the bio-mechanical make-up to run.

    OK, there's my story. Bottom line; maybe you're like me, maybe you just run like a ****** and aren't meant for running. You know what, **** it - ride a bike, go swimming, start rowing, whatever, there are other ways of getting fit.

  3. #28
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    Wow, sensitive language filter. I had no idea the first word needed hiding. Can you guess what it was? It begins with R. I wonder what else is filtered... But no, quite agree, swearing ain't big or clever.

  4. #29
    schmitty199
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    Quote Originally Posted by drummer View Post
    Its interesting that someone else has this problem. I simply cannot run either.

    Up until I was 14, I just assumed I was really unfit and bad at sport primarily because I couldn't run. Then I started rowing at school and excelled. I was one of the bigger guys in the boat and had excellent stamina.

    My cardiovascular system clearly wasn't the problem as we would do hideously long endurance pieces on both the river and the rowing machine but I would still dread every piece of running we had to do as land training.

    It became somewhat of a joke in the team, where they'd have to put me at the front so I wouldn't get left behind on runs. At one point, I had the second fastest 5000m time on the rowing machine but the slowest running time out of the top two teams. Clearly that shouldn't happen.

    Now at my university, the boat club used to do a 60 minute run every Monday night and I'd still do it and get through it but it was just on pure grit, determination and general physical fitness, rather than any sort of ability at running. I can force myself to run and I can make myself keep going for a fairly long time but it is something that I have never felt to be easy or comfortable. I look sort of weird when running too, so I believe I am fundamentally maladapted to running. I am just lacking the bio-mechanical make-up to run.

    OK, there's my story. Bottom line; maybe you're like me, maybe you just run like a ****** and aren't meant for running. You know what, **** it - ride a bike, go swimming, start rowing, whatever, there are other ways of getting fit.
    Ever thought of the possibility your arms are in great shape and your legs on completely out of shape?
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  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by schmitty199 View Post
    Ever thought of the possibility your arms are in great shape and your legs on completely out of shape?
    No. My lower body is in excellent shape. Rowing is mostly from the legs anyway.

    There is just something about running that I can't do. Which is odd.

  6. #31
    Senior Member PatheticJoe's Avatar
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    My family has a history of poor blood circulation and several members have been diagnosed with circulatory diseases. As a result cardio has never been achievable for me despite trying for very long stretches to improve it. The point of this is we are all different and can have different genetic predispositions that affect us.

  7. #32
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    Just do a little more every week. You'll notice after awhile that you are actually getting better, it just doesn't come in one big surge.
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  8. #33
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    You'll find you improve to some degree sure. But the point is, maybe there are just other ways of doing cardio which you might be better suited for. Unless you're obsessed with running, try something else.

  9. #34
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    Monitor your heart rate. Get yourself one of those watches that can measure it. I never used to think I could run long distance, untill I was given one of those watches as a xmas present. Then I realised I was just running at an un-realistic pace. When I started running in an optimal range I found that I was making huge gains in pace, and my heart rate was getting better and better. Now I can ealy run for 90 mins at a good pace.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by drummer View Post
    No. My lower body is in excellent shape. Rowing is mostly from the legs anyway.

    There is just something about running that I can't do. Which is odd.
    But a different part of the legs. Running with good form is going to mainly be triggering on the calves and quads. Rowing is more hips and posterior chain.

    A big part of running is the form. If you're laying back and coming down hard on the heels, you're going to have a hard time doing fast paces.

    It might be useful to get a form coach to take a look at your running form. There's specific training exercises you can also do force you get more of a forward lean and come down on the middle/front of your feet.

    And sprinting form is really, really different from mid to long distance form.

    Here's a good intro to running form.

    http://www.runnersworld.com/article/...8210-0,00.html

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by bas2178 View Post
    A big part of running is the form. If you're laying back and coming down hard on the heels, you're going to have a hard time doing fast paces.

    It might be useful to get a form coach to take a look at your running form. There's specific training exercises you can also do force you get more of a forward lean and come down on the middle/front of your feet.

    And sprinting form is really, really different from mid to long distance form.

    Here's a good intro to running form.

    http://www.runnersworld.com/article/...8210-0,00.html
    I'm certain you're right. But how depressing to get someone to teach me how to run! Most people can just do it naturally. Ultimately though I'm not that bothered. I can kick ass on a bike, swimming, whatever. So I'm not a good runner, who cares? I'm still fitter than most.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by drummer View Post
    You'll find you improve to some degree sure. But the point is, maybe there are just other ways of doing cardio which you might be better suited for. Unless you're obsessed with running, try something else.
    Um, no, there aren't other ways of doing cardio. I can't breathe while running, I can't magically get air just because I'm rowing or stairclimbing instead.
    23 y/o, 170 lbs

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  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Altephor View Post
    Um, no, there aren't other ways of doing cardio. I can't breathe while running, I can't magically get air just because I'm rowing or stairclimbing instead.
    OK, well that's different. You have cardiovascular issues, rather than a specific running issue. Get checked out for asthma like other people have said. If nothing, then you're just unfit and need to exercise at a moderate pace for increasingly long times. A heart rate monitor would be useful if you're serious.

  14. #39
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    Well I've always had a pretty high resting heart rate. I haven't taken it in a while but the doctor usually measures it (which isn't a TRUE resting HR, I know) at around 80-90 bpm. But, I have had regular exercise since I was a freshman in high school. I did x-country for 3 years and track for 2 in highschool, then took a year or two off to focus on my senior year of high school and freshman year of college, and then I started lifting. So I don't think I'm terribly out of shape, but maybe I am because I really don't do much cardio.

    Now that I do xfit maybe it will get better, but I still think I will get checked out for asthma.
    23 y/o, 170 lbs

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  15. #40
    195 lb. endurance geek Willie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hazerboy View Post
    I feel like no matter how bad your coach/routine/whatever was, if should have improved SOMEHOW from day 1. You might have asthma or something, have you ever seen a doctor about this?
    I agree. It could be that you have allergies or some other breathing-related issues that keep you from taking up enough oxygen.

    Remember: you can go hard or you can go long, but you can't go hard and long.
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  16. #41
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  17. #42
    Senior Member dblockspky's Avatar
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    I don't think it's asthma. I have asthma and though it may affect me to an extent it doesn't prevent me from performing well in cardiovascular exercises. You mentioned that lifting has been your primary source of exercise for the last couple years. Though lifting keeps you in shape healthwise, when you hit the track it won't do **** for you. Just keep running, if you start dying when you get to 400m then force yourself to go for as long as you possibly can or do a few miles, 3-4, without stopping. You can also do a few 400m sprints to get your wind up as well and then maybe the psychological aspect of dying at that 400m aspect will go away. It's possible your track coach just sucked in high school. Though, if all the other kids on the team were improving their times each year and you were doing the same stuff as them but saw no improvement then maybe you do have a problem and you should see a doc. I dunno what it's called but there's some way of measuring the rate at which you take in O2 during exercise and they can tell whether or not it's normal or not.

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