The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

It’s no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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Thread: Help on program

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Help on program

    I am 6ft 140 pounds (17yrs) and am looking to increase my muscle mass. I have very thin arms and legs but my chest, abs, and back seem to be to be strong compared to my friends. I have tried weight lifting in the past with no success but have learned it is probably because of my nutrition. Can someone help me construct a workout plan and diet?

    My family has this machine:

    (Not allowed to post pictures right now)

    Adjustable dumbbells, a medicine ball, and a chin up bar.

    For my diet I can't eat Gluten or Dairy and I don't want to include any processed foods. Also I don't think I need to take supplements but if you guys think it is necessary I will give it a try.

    Also I was wondering if I need to eat more calories if I am going to be doing biking/swimming with my workouts or if I would eat the same amount of calories.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member deeder's Avatar
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    At 6' tall and only 140lbs you just need to gain weight. Obviously I think that weightlifting should be a big part of that...
    Full Powerlifting
    Squat - 595lbs -- 270kg -- Dec. 31, '09 (Provincial Record @100kg class)
    Bench - 374lbs -- 170kg -- Dec 20, '08 (@100kg class)
    Dead - 589lbs -- 267.5kg -- Dec 20, '08 (Provincial Record @100kg class)
    Total: 1537lbs -- 697.5kg -- Dec 20, '08 (Provincial Record @ 100kg class)
    Bench Only -- 358lbs -- 162.5kg -- Nov. 25, '07 (Provincial Record @ 90kg class)
    Bench Only -- 376lbs -- 171kg -- Jan. 26, '08 (Provincial Record @ 100kg class)

  4. #3
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    Rippetoe's and food.

  5. #4
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    Any advice on a routine with the equipment I have? What kind of routines are best for overall mass gain?
    Last edited by Whuditdew; 07-28-2008 at 04:35 PM.

  6. #5
    SchModerator ZenMonkey's Avatar
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    ones where you are squatting 2-3x a week. use the search and website.
    Sarvamangalam!

  7. #6
    WannaBeBig Member mike42506's Avatar
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    Is there any way you could get access to a gym?
    Quote Originally Posted by RhodeHouse View Post
    Genetics is the weak man's excuse for why he sucks at life. Don't be that guy.

  8. #7
    Wannabebig Member chrissw22's Avatar
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    Like Kastro said Ripptoe's Starting Strength http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Stren.../dp/0976805405 (It's a workout routine set forth in a book for beginning weight lifters and strength training) has a very clean routine. It contains a lot of compound exercises (compound meaning ones that work multiple muscle groups).

    As for your diet.... from what I understand you can try this:
    1. Find your BMR (basal metabolic rate: amount of calories needed to perform your normal bodily functions at rest.)

      BMR = your current weight x10
    2. Next, multiply your BMR by an activity factor.

      BMR x 0.30 (for average daily activities)
    3. Last, add your BMR to your activity factor.


    Ex.:

    140lbs. x 10 = BMR of 1400 calories
    1400 cal. x .30 = 420 activity factor
    1400 cal. + 420 = 1820 cal. per day

    People who participate in regular physical activity more than three times a week will need to raise the activity factor to .40 - .60.

    So just to maintain your current weight you need to take in between 1960 cal.(@.40) to 2240 cal(@.60).

    So, I guess if you know what weight you want to be as your target goal, which I would think this is not the way to go, just plug that weight into the equation and that is how many calories you need to eat. This is not nessecarily the smartest way to approach weight gain though.

    All information from, "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Total Nutrition" 4th Ed. http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Com...2574391/?itm=2
    Last edited by chrissw22; 07-28-2008 at 06:44 PM.

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